Wednesday Jun 04, 2008

One Day

Another cool program from Firefox --  Set a Guinness World Record, Enjoy a Better Web. Really great map, too. I wonder if we could do something like this for OpenSolaris. Not to break a record, necessarily, since we are still too young for that sort of thing I think. But to do something to engage the entire OpenSolaris community around the world in some activity for one day.

Saturday Apr 21, 2007

Mozilla Japan

I stopped by to see the Mozilla guys in Tokyo today. It was great to meet Seth Bindernagel and Seth Spitzer from Mozilla in the U.S. and Gen Kanai from Mozilla here in Japan. I couldn't stay for long, but I can see the Japanese Mozilla community is thriving, which is really cool.

Mozilla Mozilla Mozilla Mozilla Mozilla Mozilla

Mozilla Mozilla Mozilla Mozilla Mozilla Mozilla

Mozilla Mozilla Mozilla Mozilla Mozilla Mozilla

Mozilla Mozilla Mozilla Mozilla Mozilla Mozilla

Mozilla Mozilla Mozilla Mozilla Mozilla Mozilla

Mozilla Mozilla Mozilla Mozilla Mozilla Mozilla

Mozilla Mozilla Mozilla Mozilla

Mozilla set on flickr

Sunday Dec 19, 2004

The Fox in Microsoft's House

Here's a wonderful article in the New York Times this morning absolutely pounding on Microsoft and using Mozilla's Firefox as the bat. What makes the article so nice are the statements from Gary Schare, Microsoft's director of product management for Windows, trying his hardest to defend Microsoft Internet Explorer. I give him all due credit for the attempt, but, well, you be the judge. Here's a sample of Schare bits (assuming he was quoted accurately, of course) from the article:

He has said that current users of Internet Explorer will stick with it once they take into account "all the factors that led them to choose I.E. in the first place."

...


Mr. Schare has said that Mozilla's Firefox must prove it can smoothly move from version 1.0 to 2.0, and has thus far enjoyed "a bit of a free ride."

...


Mr. Schare may be the official spokesman, but he does not use Internet Explorer himself. Instead he uses Maxthon, published by a little company of the same name. It uses the Internet Explorer engine but provides loads of features that Internet Explorer does not. "Tabs are what hooked me," he told me, referring to the ability to open within a single window many different Web sites and move easily among them, rather than open separate windows for each one and tax the computer's memory. Firefox has tabs. Other browsers do, too. But fundamental design decisions for Internet Explorer prevent the addition of this and other desiderata without a thorough update of Windows, which will not be complete until 2006 at the earliest.

...

In Windows XP Service Pack 2, the company claimed as a major security advance a notice that is displayed if the user takes an action within Internet Explorer that sets off a download of a tiny application called an ActiveX control, which can take control of your PC and, in a worst-case instance, erase your hard drive. "Users still must make informed decisions," Mr. Schare added. (With Firefox, users do not have to make decisions about these miniprograms, which are blocked by design.)

...

Mr. Schare of Microsoft does have one suggestion for those who cannot use the latest patches in Service Pack 2: buy a new personal computer. By the same reasoning, the security problems created by a car's broken door lock could be solved by buying an entirely new automobile. The analogy comes straight from Mr. Schare. "It's like buying a car," he said. "If you want to get the latest safety features, you have to buy the latest model."

In this case, the very latest model is not a 2001 Internet Explorer, but a 2004 Firefox.

Wow.

Friday Nov 12, 2004

Microsoft in Denial on FireFox

Companies get defensive when they dip into denial. Check this out in Cnet ... tell me that Microsoft is not in denial on FireFox.

[Steve] Vamos [Microsoft Australia's managing director] said that although he has heard other people mention the competitive threat posed by Firefox, he doesn't see it as a problem.

"I'm not sure that that is the reality. I have seen comments around that, but there is nothing I can refer to that really supports that," he said. Instead, Vamos said, consumers need to be educated about all the features already offered by Microsoft's browser.

"We probably need to do a bit of work to communicate the features that are in IE," he said.

Vamos, who admitted he has never used Firefox, said there is a lot of hype surrounding the open-source movement and that if Microsoft's customers wanted new features, they would have told the company about it.

"We probably need to do a bit of work to communicate the features that are in IE?" Wow. Wonderful example of denial.

Hey, what goes around comes around. We were defensive on .NET, Web services, XML (even though we pretty much invented it), Eclipse, Linux, and probably a few other things. But no longer. (Ok, Java is a tougher one.) We are primarily on the offensive now, which means we are no longer in denial in regard to rapidly changing market dynamics. Aside from some hangers-on out there who are still pressing the "Sun is Setting" line in the press, most of our coverage is representing Sun as being on the offensive. People may not agree that we'll succeed, but we are setting our own agenda now and not responding to our competitor's agendas. This is a critical switch.

It's fascinating to watch Microsoft respond to this stuff. Virtually all of their software products are under attack from open source alternatives, and Sun's new business model and development methodology for the Solaris 10 platform is only going to complicate the issue for them. It's only a matter of time. Ok, it may take a long time. :)
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