Tokyo Financial Hub

The Japanese are responding to pressure from global and other Asian competitors in the financial industry -- Japan aims to reinvigorate Tokyo as global finance hub. But they will have to overcome not only challenges such as regulation, taxation, and transportation but also language issues: "Foreign managers in Tokyo often bemoan the lack of sufficient staff who are fluent in English." -- AFP
Comments:

There's simply no way around it -- living in another country one should master the language or remain in isolation, having a 0% chance to ever be accepted by the natives. Plus, knowing the language of the natives also helps assimilate them and their technology, and opens up a whole new world of possibilities. After all, it is the natives that know their country best, with all the hooks, backdoors and shortcuts to get the most out of their environment.

Posted by UX-admin on May 28, 2007 at 08:51 PM JST #

True. And that's a very exciting process for an individual living in a non-English speaking region. But it goes both ways. If Tokyo wants to be a \*global\* financial hub, it \*must\* learn English. They have no choice whatsoever. Or they'll simply be passed by.

Posted by Jim Grisanzio on May 28, 2007 at 10:36 PM JST #

The article mentions "[h]igh-rise offices with 24-hour access" -- does that mean that it's common in Japan to not be able to access your office space at will? Maybe the government could just make the whole country a special deregulation zone. I'm still not entirely sure how you get Kuroneko (which is a competetive service by any country's standards) in the same country as Y150 soft drink machines. On the gripping hand, hot coffee vending machines are definitely nifty.

Posted by Brad Ackerman on June 02, 2007 at 11:16 PM JST #

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