Mega Regions

Unlike emerging economies within specific nations -- such as Brazil, Russia, India, and China -- there is another way to look at the global economy, which is via something called the mega-region. That´s the real driving force of the global economy, according to Richard Florida in Wall Street Journal -- The Rise of the Mega-Region.

Florida says that "
[t]he world's largest mega is Greater Tokyo, with 55 million people and $2.5 trillion in economic activity. Next is the 500-mile Boston-Washington corridor, with some 54 million people and $2.2 trillion in output. Also in the top 10 are mega-regions that run from Chicago to Pittsburgh, Atlanta to Charlotte, Miami to Tampa, and L.A. to San Diego. Outside of the U.S., you can find megas around Amsterdam, London, Osaka and Nagoya, Milan, Rome and Turin, and Frankfurt and Stuttgart."

He also says that
"China is not our real competitor. Rather, we should be thinking about the great mega-regions around Shanghai, Beijing and the Hong Kong-Shenzhen corridor, which account for roughly 43% of the output of the entire country."

Interesting perspective. Florida recommends a few ways of dealing with the megas, but the one I found most engaging was the promotion of density to increase innovation and production. So much for suburbanization, I guess. I´m not sure how this works with the Internet, though. The Internet enables massive distribution (or decentralization, I guess) of talent, innovation, and, in many cases, production. Does that support or undermine this mega density perspective? Perhaps both.
Comments:

interesting .

Posted by bloggersmosaic on April 14, 2008 at 04:45 AM JST #

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