BarCamp Yokohama: Fall 2009 Photos

Multiple international communities came together for another BarCamp here in Japan last weekend, this time at the Yokohama International School about a half hour south of Tokyo. Back in May we organized a BarCamp in Tokyo, and I think we`ll do more of these events after this Yokohama effort. This BarCamp model for conference organizing is interesting and extremely efficient because it`s a flat structure and distributes tasks widely: everyone organizes, everyone participates, and the schedule is built live on site. Some OpenSolaris guys were there, and we gave out OpenSolaris t-shirts and CDs and other items. The theme for the event was 21st Century Education. Special thanks to kurisuteen for leading. Great event.

BarCamp Yokohama BarCamp Yokohama

BarCamp Yokohama BarCamp Yokohama

BarCamp Yokohama BarCamp Yokohama

BarCamp Yokohama BarCamp Yokohama

BarCamp Yokohama BarCamp Yokohama

BarCamp Yokohama BarCamp Yokohama

BarCamp Yokohama BarCamp Yokohama

BarCamp Yokohama BarCamp Yokohama

BarCamp Yokohama BarCamp Yokohama

BarCamp Yokohama BarCamp Yokohama

BarCamp Yokohama BarCamp Yokohama

BarCamp Yokohama BarCamp Yokohama

BarCamp Yokohama BarCamp Yokohama

BarCamp Yokohama BarCamp Yokohama

BarCamp Yokohama BarCamp Yokohama

BarCamp Yokohama BarCamp Yokohama

BarCamp Yokohama BarCamp Yokohama

BarCamp Yokohama BarCamp Yokohama

BarCamp Yokohama BarCamp Yokohama

Comments:

How does the self organization work? Is there a pre-set schedule or is that decided as people arrive? Thanks, Rafael

Posted by Rafael on November 25, 2009 at 08:08 PM JST #

It depends.

Sometimes the schedule is made up totally live on site with people gathered around a white board writing on stickies and putting up sessions in a grid, and other times people fill in sessions on a wiki online beforehand. Generally, during the weeks of organizing leading up to the event -- which all takes place on an open list (unlike vendor conferences) -- lots of ideas are tossed around for sessions so when the actual conference rolls around it's just a question of filling out the schedule. It flows fast, in other words.

Tokyo BarCamp worked this way and so did the Community Leadership Summit:

http://blogs.sun.com/jimgris/entry/community_leadership_summit_photos
http://blogs.sun.com/jimgris/entry/barcamp_tokyo_051609_photos

The other issue with scheduling is how long to make the sessions. In Tokyo we did 15 minute blocks to really break things up massively and distribute as widely as possible. That really facilitated speed and cooperation, too. If people wanted more than 15 minutes, they could just sign up for more sessions (consecutively or otherwise). It's all very casual. In Yokohama, the sessions were 1 hour each, and that, too, generated a different flow to the day. Give people more time and they will tend to present more formally with slides and such, and their presentations will be more complete. Give people less time and they improvise more and that leads to more informal conversation and spontaneity.

In Japan some of the events were did for OpenSolaris were based on micro-talks -- 5 minute talks, no slides, schedule made up on the site, lots of beer. Fast. Wild.

What's nice about this format is that leadership from an organizational and content perspective is defined by those who show up and organize and those who present. It's just really clear. :) Stuff gets done or it doesn't.

After experiencing the Japan micro stuff and the two BarCamps, I am bored to tears with traditional conferences. So, consequently, I tend to not go to the traditional events but to instead focus on the smaller venues that are actually driven by the community (or a university, etc).

Posted by Jim Grisanzio on November 26, 2009 at 04:56 AM JST #

Very, very cool.

Posted by Rafael on November 26, 2009 at 10:19 PM JST #

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