A Blog is Essential?

There's much to agree with and disagree with in this Boston Globe article -- Blogs 'essential' to a good career.

''For your career, a blog is essential," says Phil van Allen, a faculty member of the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena.

''It's the new public relations and it's the new home page. Instead of a static home page, you have your blog," he said. It's a way to let people know what you are thinking about the field that interests you.

Sure, I get that blogs can be used as a PR tool and that you can blog and link your way to new heights of popularity and a new career. No question about it. But it's you doing that, not the blog. You have earned it, not your blog. The blog is just one (albeit powerful) syndication tool.

But is this tool of blogging "essential" for your career? What about those who don't blog but who are seriously successful and who have earned deep credibility within their communities? I see these people all over the place. I don't know about all this. I think the marketing people are making too much of this in this article. Personally, I'm becoming more interested in the non-bloggers at this point -- the ones who earn credibility without publicity. Those people fascinate me. What's the quality supporting their success? Whatever it is I bet it transcends time and tool.

Back to a few more quotes from the articles ...

Employers regularly Google prospective employees to learn more about them. Blogging gives you a way to control what employers see, because Google's system works in such a way that blogs that are heavily networked with others come up high in Google searches.

And coming up high is good: ''People who are more visible and have a reputation and stand for something do better than people who are invisible," says Catherine Kaputa, branding consultant and author of ''Blogging for Business Success."

But pick your topics carefully and have a purpose. ''The most interesting blogs are focused and have a certain attitude," says van Allen. ''You need to have a guiding philosophy that you stick to. You cannot one minute pontificate on large issues of the world and the next minute be like, 'My dog died.'"

Note the word "control" in the second sentence of the first graph. Interesting perspective, eh? Also, the bit about the people who are more visible with a so-called reputation doing better than the ones who are "invisible" is way too restrictive to be a credible statement. Just because someone is not in the public eye or a blog star doesn't mean he or she is invisible and lacks a reputation. That's one of the most ridiculous things I've heard about blogging. And the last paragraph advising that you not blog about "large issues of the world" and then also talk about personal issues is pejorative at best. Why not? Who says? Perhaps I want to know that someone's dog died, what the heck is wrong with that?

Aha. Ok, that's pretty much it. There are also eight tips to being a good blogger. I'd add one more: (9) If you are blogging strictly to enhance your career and using branding, marketing, and PR tactics, your blog may not earn as much credibility as you think. Remember, many people can easily see through blogs used simply as vehicles to publicize. Sometimes it's really quite obvious, too.

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