Sunday May 30, 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010: Photos

Here are my images from Tokyo BarCamp 2010 on Saturday. It was a long day — 18 hours door to door. But that’s BarCamp. And it was frustrating to miss so many great sessions since there was so much going on simultaneously. But that, too, is BarCamp. Aside from that, though, it was a really great day getting together with the international community in Tokyo.

This is the third BarCamp here in Japan in the last year where OpenSolaris community members have contributed in a significant way — either by presenting, organizing, or sponsoring. People from dozens of communities participated all day in sessions on software development, networking, security, content, hacking, science, ecology, politics, community building, activism, language learning tools, etc. Great to see so many guys from the Linux community participating again as well. Hope the images came out ok.

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

I have thousands more general community images here. More BarCamp Japan stuff here: Fumi Yamazaki, Rick Martin, Johan Rooms, Yoshifumi Yamaguchi, BarCamp Tokyo tag on Flickr (tbarcamp).

Duke Goes to Tokyo BarCamp

May 28, 2010 at 11:48 pm

Shoji, Matthew, and I took Duke to Aoyama tonight to get ready for the BarCamp conference tomorrow. I guess Duke does not ride the Tokyo trains very much because we got some interesting looks. And some people took photos with their cell phones. Then we met up with the core organizing team for BarCamp to get things set for tomorrow.

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tokyo BarCamp 2010 Tokyo BarCamp 2010

Tuesday May 25, 2010

BarCamp Tokyo 2010: 4 Days Away

For those attending BarCamp Tokyo 2010 this Saturday the 29th, I look forward to seeing you soon! If you've never been to a BarCamp, here are two examples of what these events look like from right here in Japan: BarCamp Tokyo 2009 | BarCamp Yokohama 2009. And there is some basic information about BarCamp here and here. BarCamp Tokyo 2010 is just four days away, and it should be a really great day. We'll have some nice donations from some sponsors (multiple servings of food, shirts, stickers, pens, software, and the building itself, of course).

But as Karamoon said in his opening speech last year, BarCamps are basically living human wikis. People make BarCamps. People sharing interesting content and experiences openly and actively in many-to-many relationships. It's all about direct participation. That's the key. There are no special speakers standing on elevated stages lecturing at people safely separated from passive and silent audiences. Everyone engages. Everyone contributes. Everyone teaches. Everyone learns. And everyone picks up the trash.

So, start thinking about what you will present. Or what conversation you'll lead. Or what idea you'll plant. Or what project you'll start and with who. Formal, informal, technical, non-technical, software, hardware, community, panel discussions, debates, photography, artwork, evangelism, marketing, hacking, leadership, activism, internationalization, science, innovation, development techniques, environmental issues, solutions to the world's most difficult problems, health and safety challenges, economics, etc. What ties all these things together is a spirit of doing and building and sharing and that's what community is all about.

We have plenty of time and space for everyone to present something. We have multiple rooms for short 15-minute talks, and a larger room for longer 1/2 hour sessions (or even longer events if needed since the schedule is made up on the spot and must remain flexible). And if you don't actually deliver a talk, that's ok, but please participate by engaging in discussions with speakers and others and in hallway conversations or over lunch or dinner or at the bar afterwards. You could very well find yourself directly involved in a new life changing experience just by showing up and discovering a new project to which you can contribute. Your input is valuable. Your voice matters. The world changes by people doing things at the grassroots level, not from the top down. This is where the ideas come from. This is where the real value is generated. Down here where people do things.

The facilities we'll have for the day are seriously beautiful. Bring your cameras. The views of Tokyo are great. Bring your laptops. We'll have free wireless. Bring your ideas and keep your mind wide open. Also, keep checking the wiki this week for more information and schedules.

NOTE: If your name is listed on the wiki that means you are committed to come. If you can't make it, please remove your name so you give someone else the opportunity to participate from the waiting list.

We are getting close ...

Sunday May 23, 2010

Photos: Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010

Here are about 90 images from the Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010 this weekend at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama Campus. I saw a bunch of guys from the OpenSolaris, Linux, and Java communities and also the crew from Tokyo Hackerspace. Great fun. Lot of interesting hacking going on in Tokyo, and everyone I spoke with said the community is growing in size, diversity, and quality.

See Make on Twitter here. See Make Magazine here. Also related from the past: Tokyo Hackerspace, O’Reilly Make Tokyo 04 2009, Tokyo BarCamp 2009, Yokohama BarCamp 2009. And don’t forget to participate at BarCamp Tokyo 2010 next week on Saturday May 29th!

Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010
Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010
Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010
Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010
Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010
Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010
Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010
Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010
Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010
Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010
Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010
Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010
Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010

Here are 320 more images from Tokyo Make 05 2010 from Lem Fugitt (Robots-Dreams).

Saturday May 22, 2010

Tokyo OpenSolaris Study Group: May 2010

A few shots from the Tokyo OpenSolaris Study Group 2010.05 today …

OpenSolaris Tokyo 052210

OpenSolaris Tokyo 052210

OpenSolaris Tokyo 052210

OpenSolaris Tokyo 052210

Friday Apr 23, 2010

Tokyo OpenSolaris Study Group 2010.04

A few shots from the Tokyo OpenSolaris Study Group earlier today. About 40 people came by on a nice spring Saturday for the six sessions (three for administrators and three for developers).

Friday Apr 16, 2010

OpenSolaris Night Seminar 041610

Last nite I went to the OpenSolaris Night Seminar in Tokyo, which is conveniently held just a few floors above my office. Project Crossbow was the main topic of conversation from engineers Mami Sueki and Junko Yoshida, who also received certificates as new OpenSolaris Evangelists (yes, you have to earn your way around here) from Akira Ohsone and Shoji Haraguchi. The talks were streamed live and Shoji recorded everything so check his YouTube page in a few days for the video.

Tokyo Linux User Group 041610

A few images from the Tokyo Linux User Group last night …

Saturday Apr 10, 2010

Sun Japan

This is where I work at Sun Microsystems in Tokyo. I wanted to get a good night shot so this one is not too bad. This is the view from my office on the 21st floor. The building sits in Yoga, it has 28 floors, and Sun lives in about 10 floors. 

Sun Japan

Other views here and here.

Tokyo Linux User Group 041010

Some shots from the Tokyo Linux User Group meeting earlier this evening …

Tokyo Linux User Group 041010 Tokyo Linux User Group 041010

Tokyo Linux User Group 041010 Tokyo Linux User Group 041010

Tokyo Linux User Group 041010 Tokyo Linux User Group 041010

Tokyo Linux User Group 041010 Tokyo Linux User Group 041010

Tokyo Linux User Group 041010 Tokyo Linux User Group 041010

Tokyo Linux User Group 041010 Tokyo Linux User Group 041010

Tokyo Linux User Group 041010 Tokyo Linux User Group 041010

Monday Mar 29, 2010

OpenSolaris DTrace @ Yokohama Linux UG

I went to the Yokohama Linux User Group meeting held at Rakuten Inc., in Shinagawa Seaside (far away), earlier tonight to see Hisayoshi Kato and Mikiya Okuno talk about DTrace. There were more than 80 guys there from multiple communities including OpenSolaris, Linux, BSD, MySQL, and others. For more on DTrace, including some Japanese presentations, see the OpenSolaris DTrace Day event from last Saturday in Tokyo.

Saturday Mar 27, 2010

A Quick Visit to Tokyo Hackerspace

I stopped by the Tokyo Hackerspace in Shirokanedai earlier today and dropped off 10 OpenSolaris Bibles and 15 OpenSolaris t-shirts. And a few hats. Actually, I dragged the stuff all the way from my office in Yoga. It took forever. Those damn bibles are bricks. A thousand pages each. But I figured a house full of international hackers could use some books and shirts. I find the Hackerspaces concept really interesting because it attracts people who participate in multiple communities.

Friday Mar 26, 2010

DTrace Day Tokyo: Photos

Here are 13 images from DTrace Day in Tokyo earlier today. This was an event organized by the Japanese OpenSolaris community, which gets together monthly (sometimes multiple times a month). There were 51 guys who came by for the six sessions that ran all afternoon. I think they all went out for a nomikai afterwards, but I couldn’t make it. Had to go swimming instead. Anyway, it was great to see so many new people come out on a beautiful Saturday afternoon. About half the people were first-timers to the OpenSolaris community.

DTrace Day Tokyo 032710 DTrace Day Tokyo 032710

DTrace Day Tokyo 032710 DTrace Day Tokyo 032710

DTrace Day Tokyo 032710 DTrace Day Tokyo 032710

Presentations (Japanese):

  • Shoji Haraguchi, Overview of DTrace (.pdf). See Shoji’s DTrace Day intro videos here and here.
  • Katsunori Fujiwara, How to use Dynamic Tracing for programing user applications (html), (html)
  • Katsunori Fujiwara, Unlimited DTrace (html)
  • Hisayoshi Kato, Dynamic Tracing for real application (.pdf)
  • Daisuke Homma, How to use Dynamic Tracing for System Performance Tuning (.pdf)

More OpenSolaris presentations archived here, here, here, and here (in multiple languages).

Friday Mar 19, 2010

OpenSolaris IPS Tokyo 031910

Here are a few images from the OpenSolaris Hot Topics Seminar on IPS tonight in Yoga. I could only stay for a few minutes, but it was nice to see around 50 people stop by for three sessions on the new packaging system in the OpenSolaris operating system.

OpenSolaris IPS Tokyo 031910 OpenSolaris IPS Tokyo 031910

OpenSolaris IPS Tokyo 031910 OpenSolaris IPS Tokyo 031910

Sunday Mar 14, 2010

Meeting the Russians

I had a really nice conversation with Vladimir Legeza and the Moscow OpenSolaris User Group via Skype late last night. Great fun. Hopefully, I can get to Russia some day. My favorite image here. Set here.  

Massive DTrace Day Coming to Tokyo

The Japanese OpenSolaris Community will be hosting a massive DTrace Day on Saturday, March 27th in Yoga. Meeting details are here in Japanese and here in English. Directions with photos are here in Japanese and English. There will be two rooms to hold the six sessions. All talks will be on DTrace and everything will be in Japanese. A nomikai will follow (of course). Developers working on all operating systems platforms are welcome.

DTrace at Yokohama Linux User Group

kato dtrace zfs japanIn my job I meet a lot of interesting engineers. That’s why I like what I do. I don’t really get the technology that deeply, but I do very much find the people fascinating. It’s the people who build communities. It’s the people who create history.

Anyway, one character I know here in Tokyo is Hisayoshi Kato (blog, twitter). He’s a core developer in the Japan OpenSolaris community. He’ll be presenting DTrace at the Yokohama Linux User Group (YLUG) Monday night March 29th (and don’t forget DTrace Day on the 27th at the OpenSolaris User Group). If you know Japanese and you want to know DTrace, you should go to these presentations. Everyone is welcome.

Kato-san presented DTrace at the Tokyo Linux User Group a while back, and he’s done technical talks at many FOSS conferences and user groups meetings throughout Japan. He also knows a bunch about ZFS, too. He’s a co-author of this book on ZFS, which is an original work in Japanese. And finally, if you are are going to the Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit in San Francisco in April, you may bump into Kato-san there as well. Hopefully, he’ll be able to meet up with some OpenSolaris guys in the Bay Area during the Linux conference.

Tokyo Linux User Group 031310

There was an interesting Tokyo Linux User Group Meeting yesterday. We did an Open Space meeting (info here, here, here) to have a free-flowing discussion about the community and what we want to do this year. I took some notes from the conversation and posted them to the list (subscribe here). Basically, we kicked around ideas for technical presentations and how we can structure meetings to enable more types of talks. Also, we want to grow the group, so we’d like to reach out to other communities in Tokyo (and around the world, actually) to see if we can enable some new connections. That’s the part I’m most interested in, and that’ll be my focus as the group’s new vice president (we did a little election today, thanks, guys!). I’m really excited about this. I’ve been participating in TLUG for a few years now, and I want to do a lot more to help the community grow. I missed the nomikai after the meeting because I was up pretty much the entire night before, but I’ll make the next one for sure. Here are some images from the meeting:

Tokyo Linux User Group 031310

Tokyo Linux User Group 031310

Tokyo Linux User Group 031310

Tokyo Linux User Group 031310

Tokyo Linux User Group 031310

Tokyo Linux User Group 031310

Tokyo Linux User Group 031310

Wednesday Mar 10, 2010

Moscow OpenSolaris User Group Meeting

I am looking forward to doing a quick video conference call next week with the guys in the Moscow OpenSolaris User Group. It will be at 2:30 in the morning for me, so I think I will make it a quick chat. Meeting details here. MOSUG info here. Special thans to Vladimir Legeza for the invite. Hopefully, some day I will be able to get to Russia. Never been. Always wanted to go.

Tuesday Mar 09, 2010

OpenSolaris Community Growth in Japan

The Japanese OpenSolaris community continues to grow. It's now the 3rd largest community in the OpenSolaris world following the Spanish and Indian communities, it's the 3rd most active, and Tokyo is the #1 city outside the United States for sending traffic to opensolaris.org. The community in Japan also continues to diversify as well with general users mixing with kernel developers and globalization engineers. In fact, this diversity is driving the need to run concurrent sessions for beginners and advanced developers and users at community events.

There are multiple parts to the community in Japan:

There is a lot going on. I try to track what I can at this tag.

Saturday Mar 06, 2010

New Website Files for Localization

Ales posted some updated application resource files to be localized for auth.opensolaris.org and repo.opensolaris.org. The auth application is already deployed and translated into 25 languages, so it will be great to expand on those community contributions. But there will be an entirely new version of the SCM Console deployed at repo.opensolaris.org later this month (the live version is not localized yet), so we are looking forward to releasing that application in as many languages as possible. Information on contributing to the website localization project.  

Thursday Feb 25, 2010

4 OpenSolaris Sessions at Tokyo OSC

The OpenSolaris community plans four sessions at the Tokyo Open Source Conference on Friday and Saturday. See announcements from Shoji and Masafumi and Reiko Saito, who also posted her slides. These sessions will involve not only dives into the technology, such as ZFS and new features in the OpenSolaris distribution, but also how to contribute localizations and get involved in the community generally. There will be a booth, so stop by and get some CDs and shirts and other stuff. If you miss the conference, you can catch up with things in March when we'll have more community events at the Sun Yoga office. A Linux technical meeting is planned for the 13th, and then there will be 3 sessions of OpenSolaris later in the month on the 27th.

Reminder: Verify OpenSolaris Accounts

Reminder: when we moved from the old tonic database to the new auth.opensolaris.org application for account management, all users had to verify their accounts on the new system. That involved logging in, following a couple of prompts, and saving. That's it. Painless. Multiple mails were sent to everyone. But, as is human nature, a few people have still not validated their accounts. So, if you haven't verified your account on the new system, you are now in the Inactive state and that means you won't be able to log in or put back code or vote or post to the forums or edit the site. Just ping website-admin at opensolaris dot org and we'll reset your account. That's a private list, by the way, and we have people in the US, Europe, and Asia managing user accounts so mails only sit on that list for a very short period of time.

Here are more contacts for OpenSolaris Help.

Tuesday Feb 23, 2010

OpenSolaris Lightning: Tokyo Dev Summit

Masafumi Ohta, Hiroshi Chonan, and Hisayoshi Kato did a lightning talk about the Japan OpenSolaris Community at the Tokyo Developers Summit. Japanese video. Good photos. :) 

Contributing to OpenSolaris & XWiki

This is very cool. Robert Antoni, who is a contributor in the OpenSolaris Internationalization & Localization Community, posted mail to website-discuss and i18n-discuss about a really interesting contribution. He localized the XWiki application resources file into the Catalan language. So after that contribution is integrated into XWiki, we'll be able to pick it up when we update our implementation of XWiki as well. And that will help the OpenSolaris community localize opensolaris.org into Catalan. So, both communities benefit from Robert's contribution. Really excellent.

Auth is already available in the Catalan language, and the new SCM Console will be as well when we deploy sometime in March. It will be good to have the underlying XWiki interface localized as well.

More information about contributing:

Monday Feb 22, 2010

A New OpenSolaris Voting Application

To make formal voting on the OpenSolaris project painfully easy, Bill Rushmore has been updating the voting application and he deployed the new version today. Voters will no longer need SSH keys since poll is now integrated with the auth database, and voting will be done via a new web front end with encryption so the command line is no longer necessary. Those were the two main complaints previously. So, now voters can just go to poll.opensolaris.org, click on a poll (if you are not logged in the system will prompt you to log in), and then point/click on a ballot. Easy.

Poll will be available to current Core Contributors (see recent audit and database clean up mail) for testing for one week. I updated the website project's announcements and roadmap pages. Here is information on all the 15 applications that make up opensolaris.org.

Friday Feb 12, 2010

Updating the OpenSolaris Participation Page

I'm starting to update the Participation page on opensolaris.org by adding context and pointers to Communities, Projects, User Groups, and Subsites that have published contribution documents. In other words, if you run any kind of group in OpenSolaris and take contributions, I'd like to build out a collection of links so we have one place to send people who are new or who may want to review a variety of ways to get involved. It's quite common to trip over new groups in this community that take contributions that I've never even heard of, so from time to time I intentionally go out looking for this information. And since the OpenSolaris community is distributed across many websites and social networks around the world, I'd like to attempt to collect more ways to contribute that are off of opensolaris.org. But the requirement is focused on contributing. I'm not interested in a massive list of spaces (we already have a million of them), I'm only interested in groups that encourage people to contribute directly to a given project. Send mail to jimgris at sun dot com and I'll update the page if I get some good links.

Wednesday Feb 10, 2010

Who Understands Communities? The Kids.

The 18-29 year olds are different. 'The Empathic Civilization': The Young Pioneers Of The Empathic Generation. And I think it bodes pretty well for the future of emerging international communities of all kinds -- technical, scientific, political, environmental, medical, etc. The article seems focused on American and/or Western people, but I wonder what this generation of kids is like in other parts of the world since culture so significantly affects opinion and action. Regardless. If you want to learn about community you need to get around people who do community. Kids. Oh, and by the way, for those above 40 or so, you don't lead in this situation. You follow. Then after you participate and contribute and earn your way you can lead in your area. But remember, everyone leads and everyone follows. That's what I like about communities. Leaders aren't special and opportunity isn't restricted. The kids seem to know that. Why don't we?

Tuesday Feb 09, 2010

Tokyo2Point0 020810

I went to the Tokyo2Point0 event last night. There were 250 people there with another 150 online, so it was a packed time for sure. Really nice to catch up with a bunch of people. I haven’t been to one of these events in many months. Just been too busy. It was also to good to see Michael Sullivan do a short talk on OpenSolaris as well.

Auth Update: Early

We had planned to update auth.opensolaris.org this week, but Alan and Martin finished this phase of the work early and deployed the upgrade last Friday. It's always cool to get something done, tested, and out the door early. This latest version of auth.opensolaris.org offers the following changes:
  • New public information screens displaying much more detail about user, collective, and governance relationships (these screens will be accessible via each XWiki Collective in the near future as well).
  • The ability to download the data from the public info screens in multiple formats.
  • New screens in each private user account displaying summary data from all the user's relationships with start and end dates.
  • The addition of eight languages (so Auth is now localized into 25 languages).
  • Some miscellaneous bug fixes and probably some stuff I missed.
Also, some of the elements on the auth.opensolaris.org page (headers and footers, basically) are now dawn via a new web service that has also been localized, so as we integrate all of the subsites with auth.opensolaris.org we'll start to layer a common look/feel across the entire site. This will take some time and come together in pieces, but the latest step is encouraging. Also, when the new SCM Console at repo.opensolaris.org is deployed, it will be localized as well (the first set of localizations is already done). Please note that all of these content localizations are contributions from the i18n/l10n community, so people from around the world are directly helping evolve the site. If the community didn't contribute this work, the site would be in one language: English. So, these contributions are huge. Here's how to contribute site localizations.

And finally there has been a bit of confusion on some lists recently about how the community is organized and the various roles/rights people have on the site. If anyone has any questions, please read the Roles & Collectives document first. It's the only document on the site that explains all the roles and all the collectives and all of the website and governance privileges. Send questions to website-discuss.

Friday Feb 05, 2010

OpenSolaris Rocks Serbia

Here is a nice example from Serbia demonstrating the value of building a local OpenSolaris community. It can lead to some very interesting organizations paying very close attention to what you are doing. Congrats, guys! Some of the OpenSolaris User Groups are doing some really interesting work out there, and they are contributing to the overall community in a very big way.

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