Fusion cooking

Fusion is hot, not only in many modern kitchens, but also at
Oracle, where it means the synergy between our middleware and
applications offering. As you might know, the next version of our
eBusiness Suite, quite appropriately referred to as Oracle Fusion
Applications, is being built using ADF and other products in the Oracle
Fusion Middleware range. Today we'll show you a quick recipe to cook
Fusion Applications right at home, with just a cup of ADF and two
tablespoons of OAF in the our favourite high-temperature JHeadstart
oven. We'll show you how we created a small ADF application that hooks
up nicely with classic eBS screens.

Business
case

For
this demo, we came up with a highly realistic business case. Imagine
you sell magical wands and bought yourself a license of the Oracle
eBusiness Suite to keep track of your many customers. As those
customers are often a few hundred years old, they have difficulty in
keeping track of their credit card numbers. Our Fusion application will
help them by
storing their credit card information nicely in the database, to
enable them to just choose their favourite credit card from a list upon
their
next visit to your offline shop (these weird men with blue-silver
dresses and hats don't like online shops). The application we'll build
serves to manage credit cards and has only two tables to be added to
the ones in the eBS suite:

Basic
JHeadstart
application

As
we'll be cooking things in our JHeadstart oven, our model project will
have to be developed in ADF Business Components. After generating the
tables, we'll let JDeveloper do the dirty work and generate ADF BC
artifacts based on these tables, which we'll then extend slightly to
use generated PKs for new records and we added a method to the
application module to generate random credit card numbers (very useful
!).

When
the model's ready, we fired up a JHeadstart project and spent a few
clicks refining the basic application. As this was supposed to be a
quick recipe, we stuck to quite simple Master-Details screens with a
wizard to add new credit cards.

Fusion
at your Fingertips

While the JAG is toasting our
application definition file, we'll take a look at a sample eBS R12
screen that offers an overview of Customers in the system. This
specific screen was custom-made with Oracle Applications Framework for
the demo, but what comes next is pure personalisation and could be done
to any eBS screen by a user with access rights to the personalize
button.

Imagine
we have this eBS customer list in
front of us
when another bearded old man arrives at our shop, wanting to buy a
fiery fire wand. Because he forgot to bring his wallet and doesn't
quite remember his teleporting spells too well, we want to quickly jump
into our ADF application to see all the credit cards he used at our
shop in the past. That's what JHeadstart 10.1.3 supports deep linking
for, so we bring up the application definition editor, add the
following to the deep linking section of the Customer group and fire up
the JAG again.

Note
that we deviate a
little from the suggested values and expressions, because we come from
a different application (outside the JSF context). We also added the
deepLink == true requirement because we don't want the deep linking to
be
triggered every time we access the Customer page, but only when passing
through this specific URL.
All we have to do left to get to
'real' Fusion is to add this deep linking URL to our eBS page as a
link, which is easily done by setting the "Destination URI" for the
customer name column in the personalizations screen to:

http://localhost:8988/Demo/faces/pages/Customers.jspx?deepLink=true&RowID={$TheRowId}

The
resulting, personalized page will now link every eBS nicely to the
appropriate ADF page!

Which
leads to

That's it, Fusion in twenty clicks.
Obviously, this is only a very simple business case with only one-way
integration, captured in a simple and publicly accessible URL. In cases
where a little more security is involved (not an issue with credit
cards, is it?), you'll need to enable Oracle Single Sign-On for your
eBS and the ADF application and probably some effort will go in
managing the security roles appropriately.
Anyway, the above
shows that small-scale integration between existing systems and
JHeadstart-powered ADF is fairly easy, given the powerful deep linking
functionality of JHeadstart, and might provide quick solutions in many
well-scoped business cases.

The source of this
mini-demo can be found here.
Unzip and open the application archive, then go to
the Project Properties of the "WorkingDemo" project,
then to JSP Tag Libraries, and Add the 2 JSF tag libraries, ADF Faces
Components, and ADF Faces HTML (which we left out to keep the zip
small).

Comments:

Great to See the Extension of Ebusiness (R12) Applications With Jheadstart?> I Am sure same thing can be done for 11.5.10 Screens also correct? How does Authentication Work? What are the Plans to Make Jheadstart available for Extending Ebusiness Applications R12 (Instead of OA Extension)

Posted by Rajagopalan Raghuraman on March 25, 2007 at 01:56 PM PDT #

Of course it can also be done for R11. The demo just uses R12 for fanciness, but the general idea is that you build your ADF application using JHeadstart directly on top of the database for superior productivity. <br/>Authentication is indeed an interesting challenge, but as the JHeadstart Authentication filter encapsulates J2EE security (cf JHeadstart Developers Guide chapter 5), an eBS system with an OID/SSO solution can use the exact same security context as the generated application.

Posted by Benjamin De Boe on March 25, 2007 at 07:34 PM PDT #

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