Solaris 10 free \*after\* 30 days

Over on OSNews there is a thread on a "Free 30-day Subscription to Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4". You can use Solaris 10 for 30 days free too. And another 30 days. And another. And so on. Solaris 10 is free. No need for a CentOS or WhiteBox equivalent. If you don't want support, you don't have to pay for it. If you want support, then pay for it (and it's very affordable).

The icing on the cake? When you change your mind on the need for support, you don't have to install new bits and deal with down time. It's as simple as writing (or not writing) a check. As your business needs change, your OS/distribution doesn't have to.

Comments:

What's the point? RHEL4 is also free after 30 days - it's still Linux and nobody can prohibit its use. RH allows to try out their support/updates service for RHEL, that's the idea. Do I get free support and updates for Solaris 10? Probably not.

Posted by Mike on February 27, 2005 at 06:16 PM PST #

What's the point? RHEL4 is also free after 30 days Actually, no it isn't. The EULA you agree to when installing prohibits use of the system beyond 30 days without a subscription. - it's still Linux and nobody can prohibit its use. Wrong again. Using this nifty thing called copyright law, RedHat has copyrighted the 'collection' that is RHEL and has control over usage of their trademark thanks to trademark law, and because of the EULA can control your usage of the overall collection of software. How do I know all of this? Simple, my company \*was\* a subscriber to RedHat for RHEL. Additionally, they can do this because much of the software contains the RedHat trademark, images and other things that are not licensed under the GPL or anything like that. So, to be able to use RHEL legally, you have to take several things out of their distribution first. This is how Whitebox and CentOS work. Do I get free support and updates for Solaris 10? Probably not. No, but you don't for RedHat either. In fact, they don't even provide the binary updates for free for manual download. You have to rebuild source pakages yourself.

Posted by Shawn on February 28, 2005 at 11:27 AM PST #

That's strange. Isn't RedHat's own proprietary part a derived work from Linux? Really strange about updates. I don't remember where did I get them, but I did that for free. No source RPMs, just binaries. Anyway, who cares? If you are an enterprise, you'll buy it anyway to have support. At home I run it anyway. But on the other hand, that's scary. I guess I need to read license agreements of both SLES and RHEL some day.

Posted by Mike on February 28, 2005 at 11:44 AM PST #

Post a Comment:
  • HTML Syntax: NOT allowed
About

John Clingan

Search

Archives
« April 2014
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
  
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
   
       
Today