Tuesday Jul 29, 2014

Winning Project Bot-So

“Bot-So is not just a robot; we tried to personify it by making it present in social media." explains Debraj Dutta, director, EdifixioIndia. Bot-So, a smart social robot that interacts with you via Twitter won the IoT Developer Challenge last month.

Created by Debraj Dutta, Tapas Bose, and Avinaba Majumder from Edifixio India, the robot can be deployed for remote home surveillance by sending a tweet. It surveys your interior space when the motion detector is triggered.

"And what could be a better platform than the Oracle Internet of Things Developer Challenge to showcase Bot-So to the world. We are really excited about this project and believe it will have a lot of good use in society. We are thrilled that we have won this award and we look forward to doing a lot more things to take Bot-So further and be a key contributor to the Internet of Things revolution” adds Debraj Dutta.

Meet the team at JavaOne 2014, from September 28 to October 2, 2014.


Monday Jun 30, 2014

Announcing the IoT Developer Challenge Winners!

Oracle Technology Network and Oracle Academy are proud to announce the winners of the IoT Developer Challenge.

Social media meets robotics. Domotics meets office design and horticulture. PINs meet voice recognition. Voting gets RFiDed. All of them making the Internet of Things come true. And, of course, built with the Java platform at the center of Things.  


The 2014 IoT Developer Challenge Winners
(Three professional projects followed by three student projects) 
  • Smart Greenhouse Project, a full-featured, automated greenhouse to grow indoor plants, developed by Dzmitry Yasevich, Pavel Vervenko, and Vladimir Redzhepov from Belarus 
  • Bot-So, a smart social robot interacting with you via Twitter, developed by  Debraj Dutta, Tapas Bose, and Avinaba Majumder from India 
  • Lhings Connected Table, an innovative design for shared office space, developed by David Peñuela, Jose Pereda and Jose Antonio Lorenzo from Spain 
  • ePot Smart Gardening, a new concept of indoor gardening, developed by Mohamed Khalil Zendah, Mohamed El Mahdi, Bouzaiane, and Mahdi Attia from Tunisia 
  • Voice Access, a voice recognition system for authentication, developed by Viatcheslav Shkurichev, Maria Chernichenko, and Sergey Chernackij from Russia 
  • JCon Rates, a conference voting system, developed by Aboullaite Mohammed, Abdessamad Amzerin, and Nisrine Jafri from Morocco
Congratulations to the Winners!  The three professional teams and the first place student team won a trip to JavaOne. Mingle with them at JavaOne from September 28 to October 2, 2014 

Thanks to all of you for participating and supporting the Challenge!  

Tuesday Sep 17, 2013

A Conversation with Java Champion Johan Vos

A new interview is now up on otn/java. In it, Johan Vos, a highly regarded Java Champion whose focus is on combining the strengths of back-end systems and embedded devices, provides his insightful take on what’s happening in the world of Java technology. His favorite technologies are currently Java EE/Glassfish at the backend and JavaFX at the front-end. He is a co-author of Pro JavaFX 2, and will be offering two sessions at JavaOne 2013.  

In the interview, Vos summarizes his sessions:

“In ‘Building Social Software on Top of Java EE 7 with DaliCore,’ I’ll show how you can integrate social software functionality into Java EE 7 applications. Many enterprise applications can benefit from some kinds of integration with e.g., Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, etc., without jeopardizing the user’s privacy and without giving up ownership of the data. The DaliCore framework adds the concept of User and OnlineAccount to the Java EE world, and provides the coupling with existing social networks. This saves lots of project-specific boilerplate code. This approach works both in web-applications as well as in desktop applications.

In ‘DataFX: The Best Way to Get Real-World Data into Your JavaFX Application,’ Hendrik Ebbers and I will present DataFX 2, a framework that helps JavaFX developers to populate JavaFX controls with real-world data. Now that JavaFX is beyond the stage of demos and POCs, it becomes important that the fake data used in demos be replaced with real data, often coming from back-end servers and databases. Apart from the regular cases where a JDBC source or a RESTful web service is queried, we will also show how changes in the local data can be propagated to the backend again...”

In discussing his efforts to combine Java EE and JavaFX, Vos remarks: “I am convinced that these two technologies are complementary, and while they are completely decoupled, the combination of them can lead to great end-to-end projects. As a POC, and in order to get more realistic use cases that could benefit both DaliCore and DataFX, I started to write a JavaFX application that offers community functionality. The front-end of that application is written in JavaFX, and the back-end is using DaliCore on top of Java EE 7. In this application, lots of data is sent from and to the back-end.”

In addition, Vos discusses his experiences with Java EE 7 and Java SE 8, the revolution that lambda expressions bring to Java, the client aspect of Java, how JavaFX fits into Java SE 8, and much more.

Check out the interview here.

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San Francisco, USA: Oct 25 - 29, 2015

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