Friday Oct 03, 2014

IoT Magic Steals the Show

By Guest Blogger Timothy Beneke

Oracle’s Java Technology Ambassador Stephen Chin presented the “Internet of Things Magic Show” session before a packed crowd on Wednesday morning at JavaOne. The session made it clear—as has much of JavaOne 2014—that with a little ingenuity, persistence, and a Raspberry Pi, Java developers can easily deploy their skills to create IoT magic shows of their own. Chin emphasized the strength of Java for the IoT space, especially now that the divide between Java SE and Java ME has been dramatically narrowed with Java 8. “Java ME as a language is almost the same as Java SE minus lambdas,” observed Chin, “and a prototype of lambdas for Java ME is well on its way. Also, a lot of Java SE APIs are finding their way to Java ME as well.”

Fun with Mr. Grabby
He presented a small smart robot, named Mr. Grabby, that resembles a crab with grippers that can be made to remotely grab and carry a white glowing ball. The robot can then navigate its way around tracks laid down in the form of white tape on the floor.

Mr. Grabby is an autonomous robot using Raspberry Pi and other hardware on top as a controller, plus an Arduino board that uses pin mapping and a motor controller. “Programming the pin assignments right is the biggest issue,” said Chin. “You use software serial on Arduino, where you take any two soft pins and do the serial protocol manually. It uses line follower software, which captures infrared light off the ground through two lights and two sensors; there is an infrared emitting light and another sensor that picks up the infrared. When Mr. Grabby goes off the track, he knows to compensate and follow the lines.”

Chin invited a developer named Mark onstage who successfully took Mr. Grabby around the tracks in a time of 40 seconds. All Mr. Grabby code is available on github.

3-D Printing Magic
Chin then displayed a 3-D printer, which was now busy making a customized bracelet for Mark. The printer has a Raspberry Pi and uses OctoPrint to monitor it remotely. He showed a console that displayed the temperature of the plate and the extruder plus a live video of the bracelet being made.

Software for the printer—known as open constructed geometry software—was designed by Michael Hofer entirely in Java. Hofer leveraged the JavaFX 8 APIs, which now include 3-D support, and built a visual tool for visualizing how 3-D products will look. The code controls space between links, the radius of the sphere, and other pertinent details.

“Printing is done by taking complex shapes and adding and deleting objects from them, so you can delete a bunch of filters from a larger filter to create a space,” explained Chin. Chin illustrated ways that the bracelet could be made bigger and smaller as needed.
He closed by showing a timelapse video of the printer constructing the bracelet.

Monday Sep 29, 2014

Duke High Five

Watch as Duke delights JavaOne attendees who lined before the JavaOne keynotes on Sunday. 

Sunday Sep 28, 2014

2014 Duke's Choice Award Winners

In this, the 12th year of the Duke’s Choice Awards, we are proud to recognize 12 winners for their innovative uses of Java. The 2014 winners are an eclectic bunch of developers, innovators, and educators. Some are using the Java platform to address real-world challenges to improve road and air safety, assist refugees, and increase grain crop quality and quantity to help feed the hungry. Others are promoting Java in home automation and game development, solving important technical issues, educating Africa’s Java community, and hoping to resolve a longstanding community debate.

The 2014 Duke’s Choice Award winners are

  • Air Traffic Controller Selection System, TUBITAK BILGEM Informatics and Information Security Research Center. This computer-based testing system is used to help select and vet air traffic controllers.
  • Apache DeltaSpike, Apache Software Foundation (Community Choice Award winner). With this developer toolbox for Java Contexts and Dependency Injection for the Java EE 6 platform, developers can introduce and test new features in Java EE before they are standardized.
  • Apache TomEE, Apache Software Foundation. The TomEE server merges a certified Java EE 6 Web Profile stack with Tomcat, the leading Java web application server by market share.
  • Autonomous Vehicle Test System, Perrone Robotics for the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS). Perrone Robotics worked with the IIHS to develop this Java-based system to test crash avoidance systems.
  • DukeScript, Eppleton IT Consulting and the NetBeans project. This alternative to Swing, SWT, and JavaFX runs on Android and iOS and enables true cross-platform Java.
  • IBFieldbook, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center. This application helps design field trials and generate crop analysis and enhancement solutions.
  • JavaFXPorts, LodgON (Community Choice Award winner). This open source toolkit makes graphically rich Java and JavaFX available to mobile and tablet devices running iOS and Android operating systems.
  • JCertif International. Since its founding in 2010, this organization has trained 5,000 Java developers across Africa.
  • libGDX. Programmers can use this cross-platform game development framework to write, test, and debug Java games.
  • PiDome. This home automation and Internet of Things (IoT) platform marries Java and the Raspberry Pi.
  • Project JEDI, Java Education & Development Initiative (Community Choice Award winner). This community-driven organization provides free courseware and training on Java and open source technologies to colleges and universities around the world.
  • WFP Subsidy Card, e-finance for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees and the World Food Programme. Based on Java smartcard technology, this card helps refugees get food through secure-card wallets.

Congratulations to all the winners. Read more about them in the latest issue of Java Magazine and celebrate with the winners at the Duke's Café Open House at JavaOne on Sunday at 7 p.m.

Java Magazine: What Will You Build Today?

When was the last time you built something, just for the fun of it? Maybe it was yesterday, and that’s great. But if it’s been a while, we hope the latest issue of Java Magazine will inspire you. It celebrates the spirit of making and the people who are creating new and innovative technologies and services.

In our interview with Dale Dougherty, Make: magazine founder and Maker Faire cocreator, we explore what’s behind the growing Maker Movement and how it relates to software development.

We also recognize the winners of the 2014 Duke’s Choice Awards, which honor compelling and innovative uses of Java technology. These winning makers help ensure safer travel, feed hungry refugees, improve crop yields, provide cool technology, and aim to end a decade-long debate in the Java community.

And we're excited to recognize the winners of the first-ever IoT Developer Challenge, who used embedded Java with computer boards and other devices and IoT technologies to showcase innovations in domotics, robotics, office design, authentication, and rating systems.

Read the latest issue of Java Magazine today.

Java: Twenty Years of Innovation

2015 marks Java technology’s 20th year, and we’re starting the celebration early at JavaOne San Francisco. Show your Java pride: Get special commemorative items in the JavaOne and Oracle OpenWorld stores, including T-shirts and pilsner mugs. Plus, we dug through the JavaOne T-shirt archives and have produced a limited-edition classic JavaOne T-shirt. Don’t miss your chance to grab one at the JavaOne Community keynote on Thursday at 9 a.m.

Saturday Sep 27, 2014

JavaOne: It’s for Kids, Too

The next generation of Java developers got a taste of programming and had fun at an all-day Devoxx4Kids event on Saturday, before the official kickoff of JavaOne. At this program, a collaboration between Oracle Academy and Devoxx4Kids, 150 kids, ages 10 to 18, got hands on and had fun with programming, robotics, and engineering. Topics included: Getting Started using Java with Alice, Creating Java Programs with Greenfoot, Lego Mindstorm Programming, Introduction to Python, Minecraft Modding, Raspberry Pi Gaming, Scratch with LeapMotion, Nao Humanoid Robot, and Introduction to Arduino.

The cost of the event was $25 and kids attended four sessions of their choice.

“Teaching children how to program must be a priority in a society where technology is becoming more and more important and Internet usage is also more and more important,” says Daniel de Luca, worldwide manager of the Devoxx4Kids initiative.

Devoxx4Kids started in 2012 in Belgium with programming workshops for kids. The program aims to teach and inspire kids about computer programming while having fun. Since its founding, Devoxx4Kids has shared its curriculum with Java user groups and other organizations around the world.  To date, more than 80 Devoxx4Kids workshops have taken place, with 2,500 participants.

“The kids are all excited . . . they are running around between workshops,” said Arun Gupta, of Devoxx4Kids Bay Area. “Our focus at Devoxx4Kids is to have a fun experience with technology. We need to train our kids in technology, and have them stay engaged in the technology at an early age. If we catch them raw, show them it’s fun, it’s possible, they won’t be scared.”

Tim Gonzales, a 14-year-old participant from San Francisco, attended two morning Python workshops. “It’s been really cool . . . I really liked it,” he said. He plans on pursuing a career in technology. “The door to opportunity is just so open. I just need to find out my passion within technology.” He added that programs such as Devoxx4Kids can help him get where he needs to go.







Thursday Sep 25, 2014

Java Champions Speaking at JavaOne 2014

The Java Champions are an exclusive group of passionate Java technology and community leaders, nominated by community. These JavaOne rockstar speakers share their kow-how in all the JavaOne tracks including client, core Java platform, Internet of Things, JVM languages, security, tools, server-side, cloud and methodology. Check out their sessions:

[Read More]

Wednesday Sep 24, 2014

Java University with Sang Shin

Sang Shin is the founder and chief instructor at JPassion.com, a popular online learning site offering hands-on courses on Java, Java EE, the Spring framework, Java development tools, Java performance, JavaScript, jQuery, HTML5, Groovy and Grails, MySQL, Android, web services, Ruby on Rails, and Hadoop. Before founding JPassion.com, Shin was a lead technology architect and evangelist at Sun Microsystems. He frequently gives talks on various technologies to worldwide developer audiences.

Q: Tell us about the topic you will present at Java University during JavaOne.

[Read More]

Tuesday Sep 23, 2014

Write Your First Book

Wendy Rinaldi is an editorial director at McGraw-Hill Education. She leads the Oracle Press publishing program, which helps Oracle professionals worldwide develop the skills they need          to be successful with Oracle’s products and technologies. You can find Rinaldi on LinkedIn,      Twitter (@wendy_rinaldi), or at wendy.rinaldi@mheducation.com.

Brandi Shailer is a senior acquisitions editor at McGraw-Hill Education,    where she is responsible for the Java publishing program for Oracle Press. She is passionate about educating developers worldwide and is alwayslooking for new print and online product ideas. You can find Shailer on LinkedIn, Twitter (@bhlynne), or at brandi.shailer@mheducation.com.




[Read More]

Join Community Events at JavaOne 2014

Once a year, the global Java community gathers on the Sunday before JavaOne at three community events. Glassfish and Java EE users join the Executive Panel and GlassFish Adoption Story and Deep Dive. NetBeans enthusiasts get together at the NetBeans Community Day, a whole day of panels. User group leaders and members attend the user group forum. Join them this year on Sunday, September 28 at Moscone South [Read More]
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San Francisco, USA: Oct 25 - 29, 2015

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