Thursday Feb 19, 2015

JavaOne Brazil Call for Papers Closes in One Week

JavaOne Latin America 

São Paulo, Brazil

June 23 - 25, 2015


As previously announced, JavaOne is returning to São Paulo in Brazil. This year, there will be an additional track dedicated to Java, DevOps and the Cloud. There is still time to send your proposals. The call for papers is open for another week until Feb 27. You can submit to the five conference tracks:

  •  New! Java, DevOps and the Cloud: focuses on the role Java plays in software as a service and platform as a service, as well as other service-related topics such as developer operations, multi tenancy and security practices. 

  • Clients and User Interface: covers the latest innovations and UI technologies encompassing client-side technologies such as JavaFX and HTML5, and JavaScript frameworks for a range of environments from small devices to high performance client systems. 

  •  Core Java Platform: covers material fundamental to all users and variants of the Java platform, including the latest developments in Java Virtual Machines, the evolution of the Java programming language, deep technical explanations of new library features and JVM languages 

  • Java and the Internet of Things: discusses Java technologies as the platform for embedded and M2M environments as well as covering device usages of Java technologies including Java SE Embedded, Oracle Java ME Embedded and Java Card 

  • Server Side Java: covers the latest updates and best practices for persistence, security, CDI, transactions, Java Message Service (JMS) 2.0, Concurrency Utilities for Java EE, batch APIs, and more. 

Veteran and first-time speakers from the community are all invited to submit proposals. Of special interest are innovative uses of Java, practical relevant case studies/examples/ practices. Both English and Portuguese submissions are accepted. Speakers on accepted submissions will receive a complimentary pass with access to all conference sessions. Submit your proposals today.


Wednesday Feb 11, 2015

Annoucing JavaOne 2014 Rock Stars

The JavaOne 2014 Rock Stars are the top rated speakers from JavaOne 2014.  Their contributions to JavaOne conference education and their commitment to the technology community made JavaOne the premier Java conference. Discover their JavaOne 2014 sessions

 Honored Speakers  Session Title
Adam Bien  Enterprise Nashorn; Unorthodox Enterprise Practices
Aleks Shulman Apache HBase 101 How HBase Can Help You Build Scalable, Distributed Java Applications

Andrzej Grzesik Continuous Delivery Antipatterns
Anton Arhipov Do You Really Get Your IDE?
Arun Gupta Java EE 7 Soup to Nuts
Axel Fontaine Continuous Delivery and Zero Downtime What Your Architecture Needs to Succeed
Baruch Sadogursky Groovy and Grails Puzzlers As Usual—Traps, Pitfalls, and End Cases
Ben Evans Java Performance Is a Social Activity
Brian Goetz Lambda Under the Hood
Brian Oliver Using the New JCache 
Cédric Champeau Rethinking API Design with Groovy Traits
Christine Flood Shenandoah An Open Source Garbage Collector (JEP 189) with an Ultralow Pause Time
Fabian Lange Are Profilers Telling the Truth? How Do They Actually Work?
Frank Kim Five Keys for Securing Java Web Apps
Geertjan Wielenga

Coding for Desktop and Mobile with HTML5 and Java EE 7 Simplifying JavaScript/HTML5 Rich Clients with Java EE       Do You Really Get Your IDE?

 Greg Luck Using the New JCache
 Hadi Hariri IntelliJ IDEA 42 Tips and Tricks
Hendrik Ebbers Extreme GUI Makeover
 Johannes Weigend Simplifying JavaScript/HTML5 Rich Clients with Java EE
John Arthorne Do You Really Get Your IDE? 
John Brock Coding for Desktop and Mobile with HTML5 and Java EE 7
Josh Long Spring 4TW!
Kirk Pepperdine Do Your GC Logs Speak to You? The G1GC Edition?
Les Hazlewood Designing a Beautiful REST + JSON API
Linda DeMichiel  Java EE 8
Mark Winterrowd Finding Subtle but Common Concurrency Issues in Java Programs
 Martijn Verburg  Habits of Highly Effective Technical Teams
 Matthew McCullough The Foundations of Git and GitHub
 Maurice Naftalin Journey’s End Collection and Reduction in the Stream API
 Michael Duigou  Jump-Starting Lambda
 Michael Hill Being Followed How Individuals Help Teams Become
 Michael Hoffer Creating Amazing Interactive Visualizations with JavaFX
Mike McQuaid The Foundations of Git and GitHub
Nikita Salnikov-Tarnovski Where Is My Memory?
Paul Sandoz Safety Not Guaranteed sun.misc.Unsafe and the Quest for Safe Alternatives
Petr Jiřička Simplifying JavaScript/HTML5 Rich Clients with Java EE
Rafael Winterhalter Runtime Code Generation for the JVM
Reza Rahman JavaScript/HTML5 Rich Clients Using Java EE 7
 Rich Hickey  Clojure Made Simple
Sander Mak  Event-Sourced Architectures with Akka                         TypeScript for Java Developers Coding JavaScript Without the Pain
Simon Maple Do You Really Get Class Loaders?
Stephen Chin Confessions of a Former Agile Methodologist
Steven Pousty Vert.x + WebSocket + Cloud = Awesome Map Tracking 
 Stuart Marks Jump-Starting Lambda
 Sven Peters Coding Culture 
Tal Weiss Fixing Code at 100 Miles per Hour Seven Techniques to Improve How You Debug Servers
Trevor Lalish-Menagh Want Code Quality? Just Ask—The Art of the Code Review 
Trisha Gee HTML5/AngularJS/Groovy/Java and MongoDB Together What Could Possibly Go Wrong?
Venkat Subramaniam

Programming with Lambda Expressions in Java             Transforming Code to Java 8                                          Programming with Streams in Java 8                                Thinking in Functional Style

Yoav Landman Groovy and Grails Puzzlers As Usual—Traps, Pitfalls, and End Cases

Join us at our next JavaOne in Brazil, June 23 - 25, 2015. Submit your proposal today. The CFP is open. 

Thursday Feb 05, 2015

Save the Date: 2015 JavaOne Brazil

JavaOne is returning to Sao Paulo, Brazil! The regional event is the learning opportunity for everything Java in Latin America - from better programming with Java 8 and the unveiling of Java 9 features, to the Internet of Things, JVM languages and more. Learn from Oracle and community experts who have first hand experience with Java development. Meet with like-minded developers and share a fun three day conference. 

Be one of the speakers who will share their expertise at 2015 JavaOne Brazil. Submit your proposals today.  The Call for Papers is open until February 27, 2015.  

Sao Paulo, June 23-25, 2015 
Transamerica Expo Center 

Register to be notified when registration opens in February. 


Tuesday Feb 03, 2015

All The 2014 JavaOne Sessions Are Now Live!

The JavaOne sessions are the premier source of learning for Java. Available now are over 300 tutorials and conference sessions from experienced community and Oracle presenters who share their know-how on the Java platform and ecosystem. The sessions touch all the topics presented at JavaOne 2014 including client, Java platform, Internet of Things, JVM languages, security, server-side, tools, and cloud. 

You can access those sessions whether or not you attended JavaOne. Share them with your peers, user groups and networks. Watch them on the go on your smart phones or tablets. 

Take advantage of this invaluable training and create your future with Java now!

Monday Oct 27, 2014

JavaOne Sessions for You!

Now you can watch JavaOne sessions online for free. Visit the JavaOne 2014 session page to view new sessions as they are released every week. Whether you missed JavaOne or just a particular session, those recordings will be available to you. The conference sessions and tutorials are available either as videos or presentations with audio. That includes all the tracks: the client, Java platform, Internet of Things, JVM languages, security, server-side, tools, and cloud. Take advantage of this great learning resource 

The following sessions are available right now
- CON1696: A First Draft of Java EE Configuration by Anatole Tresch
- CON1724: Do You Really Get Your IDE? by John Arthorne, Geertjan Wielenga, Anton Arhipov
- CON1767: Thinking in Functional Style by Venkat Subramaniam
- CON3015: Java EE 8 by Linda Demichiel
- CON3255: JavaFX 8: New and Noteworthy by Stephen Northover, Kevin Rushforth
- CON3516: Are Profilers Telling the Truth? How Do They Actually Work? by Fabian Lange
- CON4995: Ruby on Top of Graal by Thomas Wuerthinger, Chris Seaton
- CON6126: End-to-End Internet of Things Solutions with Java and Eclipse Internet of Things by Mike Milinkovich, Benjamin Cabé
- TUT1816: What’s Up with Modularity? by Bert Ertman, Paul Bakker
- TUT3419: Understanding JIT Compilation with JITWatch by Chris Newland, Ben Evans
- CON1947: 50 EJB 3 Best Practices in 50 Minutes by Ryan Cuprak, Michael Remijan
- CON2266: Enterprise Nashorn by Adam Bien
- CON2271: Frege: Purely Functional Programming on the JVM by Dierk Koenig
- CON3474: Extreme GUI Makeover by Henrik Ebbers
- CON3479: The Anatomy of a Secure Web Application Using Java by John Field, Shawn McKinney
- CON3864: Let’s Talk JAX-RS.next! by Santiago Pericasgeertsen, Marek Potočiar
- CON4636: Internet of Things Magic Show by Angela Caicedo, Stephen Chin
- CON5989: HTTP 2.0 Comes to Java: What Servlet 4.0 Means to You by Shing wai Cha, Edward Burns

Visit the JavaOne website for new content every week 

Friday Oct 17, 2014

Impact JavaOne 2015!

We need your feedback to keep improving JavaOne! Please log-in to Schedule Builder and take the JavaOne Conference Survey as well as completing surveys from the sessions that you attended. The surveys are accessed from the Welcome page in Schedule Builder if you have not taken them already. It will take you only a few minutes to complete and make an impact on your conference experience next year.

See you next year!  

Monday Oct 13, 2014

Get Your NAO Robot... Now!

As a special thanks to Oracle and the attendees of JavaOne 2014, Aldebaran Robotics would like to show it's continued support to  the Java community by offering a 25% discount to anyone interested in purchasing their own NAO   robot for development purposes.

Aldebaran supports a global community of engineers, developers, and others who are interested in exploring the endless possibilities of how robots can be used in the home, workplace, schools, healthcare, etc. The mission of our developer community is to inspire developers to challenge the future of social, emotional and personal robotics; and develop the types of applications that will allow these humanoids to enrich the lives of humans. We look forward to having you in our community.

For eligibility, please qualify yourself as a developer by taking our short developer quiz and then email to James Dietrich with a copy of your registration confirmation email for JavaOne 2014.

Monday Oct 06, 2014

Lambda Q&A Panel

By Guest Blogger Bob Larsen, Java.net editor

Stuart Marks, principal member of technical staff at Oracle, facilitated a fantastic discussion about lambda expressions during JavaOne. A panel of gurus offered their diverse perspectives and answered questions about lambdas submitted via Twitter. The panel included Maurice Naftalin, principal developer at Morningside Light; Brian Goetz, Java language architect at Oracle; Raoul-Gabriel Urma, a PhD candidate at the University of Cambridge; David Blevins, founder of Tomitribe; and Trisha Gee, Java engineer at MongoDB.

The panel opened with Urma, Naftalin, and Goetz discussing the inclusion of functional programming features, via lambdas and streams, into the Java language. The inclusion of these features allows Java developers access to these features without changing the nature of the language itself, they said.

Gee then described how MongoDB is moving toward the inclusion of lambdas and streams without losing compatibility with earlier versions of Java. This can be accomplished, she said, by exposing single-method interfaces and stream-like APIs, which both allow and encourage those using the library to use these new features without requiring the library itself to be compiled against older versions of Java.

Later, the discussion turned to when it is and is not appropriate to use lambdas. The panelists discussed how passing blocks of code longer than a single line into a lambda expression can easily make the lambda expression difficult to read and maintain. Method references allow the use of lambdas in these situations without reducing code clarity.

Because the Stream API makes parallelism so easy to implement, there is a great concern that it will be overused. “The problem with parallelism is that it’s too easy. You can just plunk it in there, and people see it as a magic incantation for extra speed,” said Gee. The panel quickly reached consensus that initially people will overuse it, and that there is no substitute for proper testing and benchmarking in a production-like environment. Goetz also pointed out that there is an extreme focus on performance, and reminded the audience that there is no reason to even think about performance tuning unless there is a business reason to do so. Frequently, the simple and easily understood code runs fast enough to meet the requirements, he said.

The conversation also ventured into the weaknesses in the current lambdas feature, mostly around exceptions. Checked exceptions do not play well with lambdas. One suggestion was simply to make the lambda expression throw an exception. Goetz explained that this was considered in the crafting of the spec. He said it is really a bad idea; it would require every lambda expression to be surrounded by a try-catch block, the catch statement must catch all exceptions, and the loss of precision should make us all “feel dirty.” Another potential problem is exception reporting; stack traces involving lambdas can be quite confusing to those not familiar with them.

The discussion closed with the panelists encouraging the audience to use Java 8—even if it is only in nonproduction situations, such as writing tests. They also pointed out that many Java developers will be learning a new programming paradigm and that they shouldn’t avoid using these features just because they don’t want to make mistakes.


Final Keynotes Reflect Back, Move Forward

By Guest Blogger Timothy Beneke
The final keynotes of JavaOne took place on Thursday, with the Intel, Technical, and Community keynotes. These keynotes cast strong glances both backward and forward at the platform and celebrated new technologies, especially related to the Internet of Things.

Intel Joins OpenJDK
Intel’s Michael Greene, vice president of system technologies and optimization at Intel’s Software and Services Group, took the stage and announced that Intel is joining the Open Java Development Kit (OpenJDK) community and will contribute math library functions that should boost big data analytics performance for machine learning.

Technical Keynote
Mark Reinhold appeared and briefly reprised his Technical keynote. Then Brian Goetz offered a vision of Java extending to Java 9 and beyond that would include value classes. Look to Project Valhalla and Project Panama for more information.

James Gosling Reflects on Java
Next, several Java luminaries—including the father of Java, James Gosling—took questions. After being asked if he regretted null pointers, Gosling quickly replied that he did not because all of the available alternatives at the time were far worse.
Gosling went on to explore why Java did not have generics from the beginning. Bill Joy, Java’s cofounder, wanted to include generics, a source of considerable conflict in 1994, but Gosling insisted that there was an insurmountable problem: Which generics do you use? Dozens of languages with generics already existed, and they all had problems. Gosling stuck to a basic principle he adhered to in creating Java: Never do the wrong thing.
When asked when Java would become obsolete, Gosling confessed that for a decade he has been expecting Java’s demise, but that Java is a kind of organism grounded in the community that is well understood and flexible and has strong staying power.
Later, Gosling reminisced about the origins of Java. “Everyone says that Java is approaching its 20th anniversary, but for me it’s the 25th,” he explained. He said that many Sun engineers were troubled in 1990 by the very primitive processors they saw in much consumer electronics—they thought the world was missing out. They took a long trip to Europe and Asia and studied primitive cell phones, elevators, lighting systems, and other gadgetry, and discovered that electrical engineers were needlessly reinventing old computer science problems. At the time, the internet was solid but not popular. Gosling credited Mike Sheridan, who was a business development person on the team, with inventing Java because he invented the reason for Java.

James Weaver: Java Show-and-Tell
Next, Oracle’s genial Java Technology Ambassador James Weaver took the stage, and reminded attendees that all sessions could be viewed on Parleys.com. A parade of talented developers and technologists followed.

Andra Kay, director at Silicon Valley Robotics, said, “By 2020 your household robot will be your house.”

Bruno Maisonnier, CEO at Aldebaran, a world leader in humanoid robots, presented a video showing robots teaching children mathematics in schools, and interacting with customers in stores. Maisonnier said that robots must (1) be cute, so that people enjoy them; (2) interact naturally in their body language and gestures; and (3) be easy to use.

Paul Perrone of Perrone Robotics lamented the 30,000 deaths from auto accidents each year in the United States, and showed a video about his automated vehicle testing system with an advanced braking system that could save lives—a first step toward cars with full autonomy.

Others featured included

  •  Johan Vos of LodgON on JavaFX on the Android
  •  Distinguished Java Champion Adam Bien on Java 8 and Java EE
  •  Jeff Martin of ReportMill Software using Java to teach kids how to program
  •  Alison Derbenwick Miller of Oracle Academy showing a video about how Oracle is spreading programming knowledge around the world
  • Duke’s Choice Award Winners
  • IoT Developer Challenge Winners

The Community keynote was the perfect ending to a great week of information sharing, learning, and community building.

Watch the Community keynote.

Wednesday Oct 01, 2014

NAO Robot at JavaOne

What does the NAO robot from Aldebaran Robotics think about JavaOne? Find out!

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San Francisco, USA: Oct 25 - 29, 2015

São Paulo, Brazil: June 23 - 25, 2015

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