Friday Aug 30, 2013

Join me at JavaOne 2013

I'm excited to be able to speak at JavaOne again this year! Last year was an incredible experience, great brain food for anyone committed to Java and the Java ecosystem. This year promises to be even better.

This year, I have the privilege of sharing the podium with some of my favorite folks in the world, from around the world! Here are the sessions I'll be taking part in:


Session ID: BOF2605
Session Title: JavaFX, Widgets, and Apps, Oh My! Launching Frameworks for Platforms Large and Small
Venue / Room: Hilton - Plaza A
Date and Time:9/24/13, 18:30 - 19:15

This is a Birds Of a Feather (BOF) session by Hendrik Ebbers, Carl Dea, and me. The best thing about BOFs (for me) is that in addition to allowing us to share what we've been working on, it allows like-minded attendees to fully participate, asking questions, sharing ideas...more like a round table for the whole room to take part in. It's incredibly stimulating, and a lot of learning takes place for all involved.


Session ID: TUT3676
Session Title: Java Embedded Extreme Mashups: Building Self-Powering Sensor Nets for the Internet of Things
Venue / Room: Hotel Nikko - Nikko Ballroom I
Date and Time:9/24/13, 12:30 - 14:30

This is a two-hour tutorial where Jose Pereda and I take attendees through building a self-licking, renewable energy (RE) ice cream cone.  :-)  Renewable energy systems come in all shapes and sizes, and embedded systems - especially Java-driven ones - are excellent for monitoring those systems. Building remote sensor nets that not only monitor and report system status, but are also powered by those same RE systems, is inexpensive and straightforward once you have the right hardware and know-how. We cover everything from hardware to software, communication and optimization, with solutions that scale well from small personal systems to utility-sized deployments. And we have a good time doing it.  :-)


So please, come join us! There's no better place to see what's happening in the world of Java than JavaOne. Hope to see you there!


All the best,
Mark

Tuesday Oct 09, 2012

Seven Random Thoughts on JavaOne

As most people reading this blog may know, last week was JavaOne. There are a lot of summary/recap articles popping up now, and while I didn't want to just "add to the pile", I did want to share a few observations. Disclaimer: I am an Oracle employee, but most of these observations are either externally verifiable or based upon a collection of opinions from Oracle and non-Oracle attendees alike. Anyway, here are a few take-aways:

  1. The Java ecosystem is alive and well, with a breadth and depth that is impossible to adequately describe in a short post...or a long post, for that matter. If there is any one area within the Java language or JVM that you would like to - or need to - know more about, it's well-represented at J1.
  2. While there are several IDEs that are used to great effect by the developer community, NetBeans is on a roll. I lost count how many sessions mentioned or used NetBeans, but it was by far the dominant IDE in use at J1. As a recent re-convert to NetBeans, I wasn't surprised others liked it so well, only how many.
  3. OpenJDK, OpenJFX, etc. Many developers were understandably concerned with the change of sponsorship/leadership when Java creator and longtime steward Sun Microsystems was acquired by Oracle. The read I got from attendees regarding Oracle's stewardship was almost universally positive, and the push for "openness" is deep and wide within the current Java environs. Few would probably have imagined it to be this good, this soon. Someone observed that "Larry (Ellison) is competitive, and he wants to be the best...so if he wants to have a community, it will be the best community on the planet." Like any company, Oracle is bound to make missteps, but leadership seems to be striking an excellent balance between embracing open efforts and innovating in competitive paid offerings.
  4. JavaFX (2.x) isn't perfect or comprehensive, but a great many people (myself included) see great potential, are developing for it, and are really excited about where it is and where it may be headed. This is another part of the Java ecosystem that has impressive depth for being so new (JavaFX 1.x aside). If you haven't kicked the tires yet, give it a try! You'll be surprised at how capable and versatile it is, and you'll probably catch yourself smiling while coding again.  :-)
  5. JavaEE is everywhere. Not exactly a newsflash, but there is a lot of buzz around EE still/again/anew. Sessions ranged from updated component specs/technologies to Websockets/HTML5, from frameworks to profiles and application servers. Programming "server-side" Java isn't confined to the server (as you no doubt realize), and if you still consider JavaEE a cumbersome beast, you clearly haven't been using the last couple of versions. Download GlassFish or the WebLogic Zip distro (or another JavaEE 6 implementation) and treat yourself.
  6. JavaOne is not inexpensive, but to paraphrase an old saying, "If you think that's expensive, you should try ignorance." :-) I suppose it's possible to attend J1 and learn nothing, but you'd have to really work at it! Attending even a single session is bound to expand your horizons and make you approach your code, your problem domain, differently...even if it's a session about something you already know quite well. The various presenters offer vastly different perspectives and challenge you to re-think your own approach(es).
  7. And finally, if you think the scheduled sessions are great - and make no mistake, most are clearly outstanding - wait until you see what you pick up from what I like to call the "hallway sessions". Between the presentations, people freely mingle in the hallways, go to lunch and dinner together, and talk. And talk. And talk. Ideas flow freely, sparking other ideas and the "crowdsourcing" of knowledge in a way that is hard to imagine outside of a conference of this magnitude. Consider this the "GO" part of a "BOGO" (Buy One, Get One) offer: you buy the ticket to the "structured" part of JavaOne and get the hallway sessions at no additional charge. They're really that good.

If you weren't able to make it to JavaOne this year, you can still watch/listen to the sessions online by visiting the JavaOne course catalog and clicking the media link(s) in the right column - another demonstration of Oracle's commitment to the Java community. But make plans to be there next year to get the full benefit! You'll be glad you did.

 

All the best,
Mark

P.S. - I didn't mention several other exciting developments in areas like the embedded space and the "internet of things" (M2M), robotics, optimization, and the cloud (among others), but I think you get the idea. JavaOne == brainExpansion;  Hope to see you there next year!

Monday Jun 11, 2012

JavaOne 2012 Java Jungle Session!

Well, it's official - the proposal I submitted to JavaOne 2012 was accepted! Pending management approval, I'll be leading the following session:

Session ID: CON3519

Session Title: Building Hybrid Cloud Apps: Local Databases + The Cloud = Extreme Versatility

If you've been struggling with ways to "move to the cloud" without losing the advantages you currently enjoy/require in your current environment, I hope you'll consider signing up for this session.

Hope to see you there!

Mark

About

The Java Jungle addresses topics from mobile to enterprise Java, tech news to techniques, and anything even remotely related. The goal is to help us all do our work better with Java, however we use it.

Your Java Jungle guide is Mark Heckler, an Oracle Java/Middleware/Core Engineer with development experience in numerous environments. Mark's current work pursuits and passions all revolve around Java and leave little time to blog or tweet - but somehow, he finds time to do both anyway.

Mark lives with his very understanding wife, three kids, and dog in the St. Louis, MO area.



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