Looking Through the Telescope From the Big End: Four Small Java Developments that Pack a Punch!

There are a LOT of exciting developments in Java, almost on a daily basis. Most of them make a big splash, and for good reason! But sometimes, it's the little things...

There have been a lot of small developments in Java that are pretty exciting, too. I'll pick out four of my favorites - each at a different level and/or stage of development or detail - and explain why they're a big deal. Let's get started!

Home automation

I had the privilege of watching Vinicius and Yara Senger give a presentation at Jfokus (available below at Parleys.com) on Java EE and home automation. The Sengers developed the jHome platform and run it on GlassFish, controlling Arduino-based appliances in their home, office, and boat. I won't give away all the spoilers, and it isn't Java end-to-end...but the Sengers are demonstrating a compelling, fully open source (hardware and software!) package for Java working in harmony with even the tiniest of devices.

Robotics

FIRST, or "For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology", was founded by world-renowned inventor Dean Kamen. In his words:

"Our mission is to inspire young people to be science and technology leaders, by engaging them in exciting mentor-based programs that build science, engineering and technology skills, that inspire innovation, and that foster well-rounded life capabilities including self-confidence, communication, and leadership."

FIRST's vehicle for doing this is robotics. Teams of various ages use available technology components and their brains to develop and program robots to compete in some pretty tricky challenges. This isn't Robot Wars (no Real Steel destructive matches here), but it's just as engaging - for the teams and spectators alike.

The 2012 FIRST International Championship was held in St. Louis, MO, USA, and teams representing several countries participated. I was able to attend for awhile - with an event like this, you just can't see it all! - and chanced upon a team in the pit area with a homemade sign saying "We use JAVA!". I was directed to the 15 year-old programmer who proudly informed me that they use NetBeans and Java to program their robot. We had a nice conversation, and I was left with the realization that Java's original "embedded" mission is still being realized in ways that we don't often think about.

Raspberry Pi

Simon Ritter recently posted about his work with the Raspberry Pi and JavaFX 2. I had seen others relate their victories getting OpenJDK onto the little Pi, a small-but-capable computer the size of a deck of cards...but Simon (and those who provided assists in whatever form) took the bar and threw it up onto the roof. It won't win any supercomputer awards (well, not alone anyway!), but the Raspberry Pi's small size and low price now make a host of formerly-unrealistic uses possible. Even before much optimization is done, JavaFX 2 is already running. If you've ever migrated existing software (of any kind) to a new platform, you know that that first "clean" run can be elusive. I can't wait to see how far we can take this...just as I can't wait for my pre-ordered Pi to hurry up and get here!

Harmonization of Java ME, SE

Henrik Stahl was on the Java Spotlight podcast recently (link below) presenting a clear vision for the harmonization of Java Micro Edition (ME) and Standard Edition (SE). The devil is in the details, of course, but here's the good news:

1) There is a plan
2) The plan makes sense
3) The plan is being worked...diligently!

Without getting into those details or the challenges surrounding them (API synchronization, Jigsaw, etc.), a modern, consistent set of APIs and a modular architecture should excite Java developers wherever they may fall along the spectrum.

The Bottom Line

It's an exciting time to work with Java at any level, and that includes in the crevices where small and/or embedded devices often lie hidden from view. If you haven't already been involved in "Java in the small", check it out. And if you have a favorite I've missed, drop me a line or comment below! If you like it, chances are the rest of us will, too.  :-)

All the best,
Mark



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About

The Java Jungle addresses topics from mobile to enterprise Java, tech news to techniques, and anything even remotely related. The goal is to help us all do our work better with Java, however we use it.

Your Java Jungle guide is Mark Heckler, an Oracle Java/Middleware/Core Engineer with development experience in numerous environments. Mark's current work pursuits and passions all revolve around Java and leave little time to blog or tweet - but somehow, he finds time to do both anyway.

Mark lives with his very understanding wife, three kids, and dog in the St. Louis, MO area.



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