Improved support for JavaFX in your favorite Java IDE

On April 3rd, 2013, JetBrains, the company behind IntelliJ IDEA, announced support for JavaFX in IntelliJ IDEA 12.1, the latest version of their Java Integrated Development Environment (IDE). Support for JavaFX includes complete support for FXML markup, custom CSS, code completion, navigation and search, refactorings, packaging tools. IntelliJ IDEA 12.1 also adds includes integration with JavaFX Scene Builder, Oracle's visual layout tool for JavaFX.

JavaFX development in IntelliJ IDEA

Coincidentally, the NetBeans team released the GA version of NetBeans IDE 7.3 on February 21st, which features, among other features, improved support for JavaFX Scene Builder,  including improved FXML editing with code completion, and FXML controller generation. An increasing number of Java developers are using NetBeans to create new JavaFX applications, or migrating Swing and NetBeans RCP applications to JavaFX.

FXML code completion in NetBeans IDE

Eclipse users don't need to be jealous; e(fx)clipse provides a great JavaFX tool solution for Eclipse and OSGi, including integration with Eclipse JDT and Eclipse PDE, an FXML editor with code completion, and a JavaFX-proof CSS editor. Note that e(fx)clipse has been proposed as an Eclipse Foundation project.

e(fx)clipse CSS editor

It has never been a better time to develop rich client applications with Java; developers can now leverage even better support for JavaFX development in the leading Java IDEs, including NetBeans, Eclipse, and IntelliJ, as well as a number of specialized tools, utilities, and application frameworks.

To sum it up: get coding!

Comments:

Are there really any NetBeans RCP applications out there that are being migrated to JavaFX? Strongly doubt that since JavaFX doesn't have the basic building blocks required by applications -- an application framework, a module system, an update mechanism. Some apps on the NetBeans RCP are integrating JavaFX but none, anywhere, are migrating away from the NetBeans RCP. This might change if the JavaFX engineers were to focus on applications instead of widgets... but doesn't look like that's happening.

Posted by Tom Franks on March 01, 2013 at 06:46 AM PST #

@ Tom

What I meant was that the Swing UI in NetBeans RCP applications is being migrated to a JavaFX UI, preserving the NetBeans RCP investment in these apps.

Posted by guest on March 01, 2013 at 11:23 AM PST #

Post a Comment:
  • HTML Syntax: NOT allowed
About

This blog is maintained by Nicolas Lorain, Java Client Product Manager. The views expressed on this blog are my own & do not necessarily reflect the views of Oracle.

Search

Categories
Archives
« April 2014
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
  
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
   
       
Today