Friday Aug 05, 2011

A Fresh Look at Embedded with Greg Bollella, Chief Architect, Embedded Java

In a new interview on OTN, Greg Bollella explores the rich potential of Java in the embedded space. He defines the embedded space as, “any device that includes a general-purpose processor and OS, plus a software execution environment, but which would not be identified as a computer by a layperson.” He points out that, increasingly, with cars, stereos, printers, cameras, TVs and DVDs, traffic signals controllers, planes, washing machines, refrigerators, and much more, it’s the software and not the hardware that matters the most.

Bollella believes that developers have only scratched the surface when it comes to Java for embedded and that Java’s multi-core support, security, multi-platform support, and networking strengths are of great value for embedded developers.

As he states in the interview, “To create new projects we want to create a VM and library set and some tools to entice the embedded developer to use Java for their next project. So that’s my mission.”

To integrate embedded devices into a networked world is no small task. From the interview:

“You need a fairly complex software architecture to integrate these devices into the networked world. Doing that from scratch is pretty tough. Oracle can provide the client side piece, the piece in the device, as well as the backend servers and the middleware. That, combined with a very small amount of engineering from the device manufacturers, can enable them to collect operational data on the device, time-stamp it, save it to the local data base, and have that data be automatically synced with the backend database and thus available for analysis and provision of new services for the device owner.”

Read the interview here.

Monday May 09, 2011

Hello Blu-ray 3D World!

A new article, rich in practical resources, by Oracle’s Michael Lagally and titled “Hello Blu-ray 3D World,” teaches developers how to write their own 3D Java “Hello World” application for a home theater using Blu-ray 3D concepts and the BD-J platform.

The article makes it clear how remarkably little is required to get started:

“First you need a Java platform connected to your TV. The good news is that you most likely already have a full-blown Java platform connected to your TV in the form of a Blu-ray player. The latest Blu-ray players are capable of displaying 3D content, and since the Blu-ray standard comes with Java 3D APIs, you are good to go.

Even if you don’t have a 3D TV or a Blu-ray player, you can still start developing and testing 3D programs. All you need, provided you own a Microsoft Windows computer, is free software and a pair of red/blue glasses (also called anaglyph glasses) that you can get for a few dollars.”


Read the entire article Hello Blu-ray 3D World.
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