Wednesday Jul 17, 2013

And The Winners Are.... the most popular articles on otn

Here is a list of the most popular articles, in terms of traffic, on otn/java in the last 12 months. It's, as usual, a rich mix of Java and Java-related technologies, types of articles and variety of authors.

Check out any that you might have missed and vote with your visit.


1.  “Getting Started with Java® SE Embedded on the Raspberry Pi" by Bill Courington and Gary Collins August 2012

2. “How to Get Started (FAST!) with JavaFX 2 and Scene Builder”  by Mark Heckler  November 2012

3. “Arun Gupta on Higher Productivity from Embracing HTML5 with Java EE 7”  by Janice J. Heiss  February 2013

4. “Java Experts on the State of Java” by Janice J. Heiss   January 2013

5. “Java EE 7 and JAX-RS 2.0” by Adam Bien  April 2013

6. “Coding on Crete: An Interview with Java Specialist Heinz Kabutz” by Janice J. Heiss     January 2013  http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/articles/java/heinzkabutz-1899134.html

7. “Why, Where, and How JavaFX Makes Sense”  by Björn Müller  March 2013

8. “The Advent of Kotlin: A Conversation with JetBrains' Andrey Breslav”  by Janice J. Heiss  April 2013

9. “The Enterprise Side of JavaFX”  by Adam Bien   June 2012

10. “JSR 356, Java API for WebSocket”  by Johan Vos  April 2013

And here are five runners up.

11. “Introducing Groovy”  by Jim Driscoll  July 2012

12. “The Enterprise Side of JavaFX: Part Two”  by Adam Bien  June 2012

13. “Expressing the UI for Enterprise Applications with JavaFX 2.0 FXML” by James L. Weaver  June 2012

14. “JavaOne 2012 Review: Make the Future Java” by Steve Meloan  October 2012

15. “Expressing the UI for Enterprise Applications with JavaFX 2.0 FXML - Part Two”  By James L. Weaver  September 2012

Monday Sep 10, 2012

Expressing the UI for Enterprise Applications with JavaFX 2.0 FXML - Part Two

A new article by Oracle’s Java Champion Jim Weaver, titled “Expressing the UI for Enterprise Applications with JavaFX 2.0 FXML -- Part Two,” now up on otn/java, shows developers how to leverage the power of the FX Markup Language to define the UI for enterprise applications. Weaver, the author of Pro JavaFX Platform, extends the SearchDemoFXML example used in Part One to include more concepts and techniques for creating an enterprise application using FXML.

Weaver concludes the article by summarizing its content, “FXML provides the ability to radically change the UI without modifying the controller. This task can be accomplished by loading different FXML documents, leveraging JavaFX cascading style sheets, and creating localized resource bundles. Named parameters can be used with these features to provide relevant information to an application at startup.”


Check out the article here.





Wednesday Jun 20, 2012

Expressing the UI for Enterprise Applications with JavaFX 2.0 FXML - Part One

A new article, the first of two parts, now up on otn/java by Oracle Evangelist and JavaFX expert, James L. Weaver, titled “Expressing the UI for Enterprise Applications with JavaFX 2.0 FXML, Part One,” shows developers how to leverage the power of the FX Markup Language (FXML) to define the UI in enterprise applications.

As Weaver explains, “JavaFX 2.0 is an API and runtime for creating Rich Internet Applications (RIAs). JavaFX was introduced in 2007, and version 2.0 was released in October 2011. One of the advantages of JavaFX 2.0 is that the code can be written in the Java language using mature and familiar tools.”

He goes on to show how to use the potential of FX Markup Language, which comes with JavaFX 2.0, to efficiently define the user interface for enterprise applications. FXML functions to enable the expression of the UI using XML. “Classes that contain FXML functionality are located in the javafx.fxml package,” says Weaver, “and they include FXMLLoader, JavaFXBuilderFactory, and an interface named Initializable.”

Weaver’s article offers a sample application that shows how to use the capabilities of FXML and JavaFX 2.0 to create an enterprise app.

Have a look at the article here.

Wednesday May 23, 2012

Best Practices for JavaFX 2.0 Enterprise Applications, Part Two

Java Champion, Oracle Java Evangelist, and JavaFX expert Jim Weaver, has published Part Two of his article, "Best Practices for JavaFX 2.0 Enterprise Applications" on otn/java. Weaver continues to explore the possibilities of the TweetBrowser application, focusing now on new techniques and best practices that include:

* Leveraging a JavaFX cascading style sheet
* Implementing springs and struts in the UI
* Using a ternary operation in binding expressions
* Defining JavaFX properties
* Leveraging a Popup to implement a dialog box
* Using WebView to display a Web page

As Weaver emphasizes, there is a vast array of techniques and best practices that can be used in JavaFX applications. For example:

The JavaFX cascading style sheet (CSS) enables users to modify the appearance of an application.

The springs and struts concept enables a fixed horizontal strut and a variable horizontal spring so that an application can appear the way developers want it to appear, regardless of the size of the scene or the type of platform.

Go here to learn more about the rich possibilities of JavaFX 2.0 and enterprise applications.

Monday Apr 16, 2012

Best Practices for JavaFX 2.0 Enterprise Applications

A new article, up on otn/java, by Java Champion, Oracle Java Evangelist, and JavaFX expert Jim Weaver, titled "Best Practices for JavaFX 2.0 Enterprise Applications (Part One),” explores best practices for developing enterprise applications in JavaFX 2.0.

Weaver illustrates his points by examining a sample application named TweetBrowser which contains the following:

* “A Toolbar containing a TextField and a couple of Button controls for searching and navigating tweets obtained from the Twitter REST API.
* A ListView whose cells contain representations of the tweets. Each tweet is represented by a subclass of ListCell that contains an ImageView for the profile picture and Hyperlink controls that enable the user to navigate to screen names, hashtags, and Web links.
* A ProgressIndicator that spins when a search is performed and a WebView that displays the Web page associated with a Web link in a tweet.”

The TweetBrowser project, which Weaver invites the reader to download, contains the code for the application, portions of which he highlights throughout the article. Techniques and best practices used in the TweetBrowser application include:

    “Invoking an application via Java Web Start from the application’s home page
    Ensuring only one instance of the application is started
    Binding the UI to the model”

Weaver concludes the article by observing that, “Implementing techniques such as invoking an application via Java Web Start from the application’s home page, ensuring only one instance of the application is started, and binding the UI to the model make life easier for both the user and the developer."

Please stay tuned for Part Two of this series where Jim will explore more techniques and best practices used in the TweetBrowser example application.

You'll find Part One here.

Thursday Mar 01, 2012

Laying Out a User Interface with JavaFX 2.0

Java Champion and JavaFX expert Jim Weaver has a new article up on otn/java, titled “Laying Out a User Interface with JavaFX 2.0,” in which he shows developers how to use the layout capabilities of JavaFX 2.0 to make nodes in a scene graph appear where they belong and with the appropriate size.

He provides an overview of the LayoutSansTearsSolution application, shows how to make use of the SceneBuilder and BorderPaneBuilder classes, and helps readers understand the behavior of resizable nodes. Weaver explains the distinction between clamped and unbounded nodes and, finally, shows how to use CSS style sheet properties to modify the layout.

From the article:

“JavaFX has very powerful features for laying out a user interface... These features enable your applications to appear the way you want them to appear, regardless of the size of the scene or the type of platform. Understanding the behavior of each type of layout class, as well as concepts such as clamped versus unbounded nodes, will go a long way toward helping you make the UI appear exactly the way you want it.”

Read the complete article here.

Friday Nov 18, 2011

JavaFX 2.0 at Devoxx 2011

JavaFX had a big presence at Devoxx 2011 as witnessed by the number of sessions this year given by leading JavaFX movers and shakers.

  •     “JavaFX 2.0 -- A Java Developer's Guide” by Java Champions Stephen Chin and Peter Pilgrim
  •     “JavaFX 2.0 Hands On” by Jasper Potts and Richard Bair
  •     “Animation Bringing your User Interfaces to Life” by Michael Heinrichs and John Yoong (JavaFX development team)
  •     “Complete Guide to Writing Custom Bindings in JavaFX 2.0” by Michael Heinrichs (JavaFX development team)
  •     “Java Rich Clients with JavaFX 2.0” by Jasper Potts and Richard Bair
  •     “JavaFX Properties & Bindings for Experts” (and those who want to become experts) by Michael Heinrichs (JavaFX development team)
  •     “JavaFX Under the Hood” by Richard Bair
  •     “JavaFX Open Mic” with Jasper Potts and Richard Bair


With the release of JavaFX 2.0 and Oracle’s move towards an open development model with an open bug database already created, it’s a great time for developers to take the JavaFX plunge.


One Devoxx attendee, Mark Stephens, a developer at IDRsolutions blogged about a problem he was having setting up JavaFX on NetBeans to work on his Mac. He wrote:


“I’ve tried desperate measures (I even read and reread the instructions) but it did not help. Luckily, I am at Devoxx at the moment and there seem to be a lot of JavaFX gurus here (and it is running on all their Macs). So I asked them… It turns out that sometimes the software does not automatically pickup the settings like it should do if you give it the JavaFX SDK path. The solution is actually really simple (isn’t it always once you know). Enter these values manually and it will work.”


He simply entered certain values and his problem was solved. He thanked Java Champion Stephen Chin, “for a great talk at Devoxx and putting me out of my misery.”


JavaFX in Java Magazine

Over in the November/December 2011 issue of Java Magazine, Oracle’s Simon Ritter, well known for his creative Java inventions at JavaOne, has an article up titled “JavaFX and Swing Integration” in which he shows developers how to use the power of JavaFX to migrate Swing interfaces to JavaFX. The consensus among JavaFX experts is that JavaFX is the next step in the evolution of Java as a rich client platform.


In the same issue Java Champion and JavaFX maven James Weaver has an article, “Using Transitions for Animation in JavaFX 2.0”. In addition, Oracle’s Vice President of Java Client Development, Nandini Ramani, provides the keys to unlock the mysteries of JavaFX 2.0 in her Java Magazine interview.


Look for the JavaFX community to grow and flourish in coming years.

Monday Oct 17, 2011

JavaFX 2.0 Arrives and is Open Sourced

JavafxAmong the big news at JavaOne 2011 was the release of JavaFX 2.0 and announcement of its open source status. As Oracle’s Chief Architect, Client Java Platform Richard Bair observed, “We think this is going to be a really big deal in the industry.” JavaFX 2.0, touted as the next step in the evolution of Java as a rich client platform, is designed to provide a modern Java environment that shortens development time and eases the deployment of data driven-business and enterprise client applications.

 

Its key features include:

 

• Java APIs for JavaFX

 

• FXML -- an XML-based markup language for defining user interfaces

 

• Seamless integration into Swing applications

 

• High-performance hardware accelerated graphics

 

• Embedding of web content into JavaFX

 

• High-performance media engine

 

• Improved UI controls library

 

JavaFX 2.0 enables developers to leverage their existing Java skills and tools to develop JavaFX applications. It offers a clean separation of application UI and logic and simplifies code maintenance while integrating Web content and media seamlessly in Java applications. Developers can more easily create scalable, graphics-rich applications without performance penalties, build sophisticated user interfaces, extend existing Swing applications, and deploy applications in the browser, as desktop, or Web Start applications.

 

Java APIs for JavaFX include:

 

• End-to-end Java development

 

• Java language features—generics, annotations, multi-threading

 

• Reduced static footprint of runtime and applications

 

• Fluent API design for UI construction

 

• Development in alternative languages (e.g., JRuby, Groovy) with JavaFX

 

• Leverage sophisticated Java IDEs, debuggers and profilers

 

• Java APIs preserve convenient JavaFX Script features (e.g., bind)

 

Other features to take note of in JavaFX 2.0:

 

FXML

 

• Scriptable, XML-based markup language for defining user interfaces

 

• Convenient alternative to developing UI programmatically in Java

 

• Easy to learn and intuitive for developers familiar with web technologies or other markup based UI technologies

 

• Powerful scripting feature allows embedding scripts within a FXML file. Any JVM scripting language can be used, including JavaScript, Groovy, and Clojure, among others

 

New Graphics Pipeline for Modern GPUs

 

• New hardware accelerated graphics pipeline (Prism)

 

• New windowing toolkit (Glass) for Prism

 

• Java2D software pipeline for unsupported graphics hardware

 

• High-level support for making rich graphics simple: Shadows, Blurs, Reflections, Effects, 2D and 3D transforms

 

 

Rich Set of UI Controls

 

• Over 50 components for form-based UI, including charts, layout and form controls

 

• CSS3+ skinning and layout of UI controls

 

• Advanced UI controls, including table, tree view, rich text editor

 

 

Web Component

 

• Embed Web content in JavaFX applications

 

• HTML and JavaScript rendering based on Webkit

 

• DOM access and manipulation from Java

 

 

Browser Plug-in Refreshed for JavaFX 2.0

 

• Loading of JavaFX applets based on Prism

 

• Preloader for JavaFX applets for improved user experience

 

 

Powerful Properties Model

 

• New collections ObservableList, Sequence and ObservableMap

 

• New design and implementation of bean properties

 

• Low level binding API for high performance, low footprint bindings

 

• High level binding API for simple usage

 

 

Improved Animation Engine

 

• Optimized implementation of transitions

 

• Complete overhaul of API to simplify usage and in preparation of optimized and more stable implementation

 

 

Approximately 50 JavaFX 2.0 sessions can be found at JavaOne given by leading JavaFX movers and shakers. JavaFX is the next step in the evolution of Java as a rich client platform. Congratulations to all involved!  


Wednesday Jul 20, 2011

Using Transitions for Animation in Oracle’s JavaFX 2.0

A new article by Java Champion and JavaFX expert, Jim Weaver, titled “Using Transitions for Animation in Oracle’s JavaFX 2.0,” shows developers how to animate their nodes in scenes the easy way, using the JavaFX 2.0 TranslateTransition class. JavaFX comes with its own transition classes, whose purpose is to provide convenient ways to do commonly used animation tasks. The article shows how to use the TranslateTransition class to animate a node, moving it back and forth between two positions in the UI.

From the article:

“JavaFX 2.0 comes with several transition classes (that extend the Transition class) whose purpose is to animate visual nodes in your application. JavaFX also contains many builder classes that provide the ability to express a user interface in a declarative-style. In addition, JavaFX has a powerful property binding capability in which properties may be bound to expressions to automatically keep them updated.”

Read the article here.

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