Friday Sep 06, 2013

Java Champion/Rock Star Adam Bien at JavaOne 2013

Java Champions are developers who have made important contributions to the Java community; JavaOne Rock Stars are developers who have given highly rated sessions at JavaOne. Adam Bien is both – and one of the most distinguished Java developers in the community. He is an Expert Group member for the Java EE 6/7, EJB 3.X, JAX-RS and JPA 2.X JSRs and is an architect and developer for Java SE and Java EE projects. He has edited several books about JavaFX, J2EE, and Java EE, and is the author of Real World Java EE Patterns—Rethinking Best Practices, and Real World Java EE Night Hacks.

Bien is a Top Java Ambassador 2012, and JavaOne 2009, 2011, 2012 Rock Star. If all this were not enough, he was, in 2010, named Oracle Magazine’s Java Developer of the Year.

His 2013 sessions include:

CON2196: “Lean and Opinionated Java EE 7 Applications”
CON2229: “Architecting Enterprise JavaFX 8 Applications”
CON2230:  “Unit Tests Don’t Break: Stress-Testing Java EE Applications”
CON2231: “Demystifying Java EE”
UGF10369: “Cool NetBeans Tips and Tricks for Java EE 7 Development”

Q: Tell us about your JavaOne sessions.

Bien: In “Cool NetBeans Tips and Tricks for Java EE 7 Development,” I will introduce my favorite NetBeans features. I think I may surprise some attendees with NetBean's productivity and effectiveness.

In “Architecting Enterprise JavaFX 8 Applications,” I would like to introduce a Model View Presenter Architecture with Dependency Injection based on a "framework," only containing two classes. I would also like to highlight the interaction with SceneBuilder, the JavaFX WYSIWYG editor, without being too heavily dependent on it.

In the session "Demystifying Java EE," I will discuss some recurring misconceptions about the concepts and inner workings of Java EE. There is no magic in Java EE – Java EE 7 is very effective, if you follow some rules.

In “Lean and Opinionated Java EE 7 Applications,” I will introduce opinionated approaches and best practices for the design and implementation of Java EE 7 applications. I'm probably going to shock some architects, but the developers should like this session.

In “Unit Tests Don’t Break: Stress-Testing Java EE Applications,” I plan to stress test a Java EE 7 application and monitor the results in real time. Stress testing is incredibly important and sometimes not even a part of the development cycle.

Q: In addition to your sessions, what do you have planned for JavaOne?

Bien: JavaOne is one of the few conferences where I attend other sessions -- from dawn to dusk. In recent years there was not always time to pick lunch. At NetBeans/GlassFish days before JavaOne I will probably meet some Java friends, while at the actual JavaOne I’ve never managed to do that. The technical content is too good and there is not enough time between the sessions.

Q: Tell us about what’s happening with Enterprise JavaFX 8 apps.

Bien: In the recent edition of airhacks.com I started with HTML 5, but most of the attendees waited for Java FX 8 news. There are a lot of Swing applications out there. Migration from Swing to JavaFX is one of the FAQs. Also JavaFX is "just" Java. You can develop now from the User Interface to the back end using the same language, tools, and environments. You can use the same debugger, profiler or memory analyzer for all of your application tiers and layers. JavaFX suits perfectly enterprise application needs.

Q: What have you been working on lately?

Bien: I’ve helped my customers implement Java EE 7 and JavaFX applications. Also, I ported lightfish.adam-bien.com to Java EE 7 and GlassFish v4 and was even able to simplify the code. I also ported Apache FTP Mina to JavaEE7: http://e2ftp.adam-bien.com

Q: What are your expectations for Java EE 7? For Java SE 8?

Bien: I was already very happy with Java EE 6, so Java EE 7 can only exceed my expectations. I'm using daily builds of JavaFX coming with JDK 1.8 for my "leisure" activities. Here I would expect more stability and even better performance. 

Q: How do you assess the state of Java today?

Bien: Java is more interesting for building apps, than ever. And the interest is huge. This year there is an increased tendency to sell out workshops, sessions and conferences. Java 8 together with Java EE 7 and JavaFX 8 will make it even more interesting.

Java has only one problem: its age. We tend to forget how performant, scalable, ubiquitous, and "cutting edge" the Java ecosystem actually is.

Q: What should Java developers understand about unit testing?

Bien: Don't overdo it. Statistics do not matter. Test complex stuff first -- and there is no difference between writing tests for Java SE and Java EE applications

Q: Tell us about ways NetBeans can be used for Java EE 7 development?

A: With NetBeans I'm still able to surprise seasoned developers with productivity without any magic. As a contractor/freelancer I really don't like to spend any time with IDE maintenance and setup. With NetBeans I'm able to set up my full Java EE environment in about a minute on Linux, Windows or Mac. Without any plugins, configurations or restarts. For that reason, I'm using NetBeans daily builds without any friction. What I like the most: NetBeans supports me with integrated code completion, JavaDoc, hints and occasional helpers on demand (like, e.g., creation of beans.xml or persistence.xml) without excessive code generation or opaque wizards. You can achieve 80% with two shortcuts: ctrl + space and alt + enter.

Adam Bien’s Blog

Tuesday May 15, 2012

JSF 2.0 for the Cloud, Part Two

Part Two of Deepak Vohra’s “JSF 2.0 for the Cloud” is now up on otn/java. In Part One, Vohra demonstrated how to take advantage of resource handling, @ManagedBean annotation, and implicit navigation. In Part Two, he explores new features in JSF 2.0 that make it ready for the cloud, including Ajax support, view parameters, preemptive navigation, event handling, and bookmarkable URLs.

Ajax support for JSF 2.0 components includes asynchronous transfer of data between a client and a server, along with partial page rendering, partial page processing, and grouping of components, and can be added using either f:ajax tag or the JSF Ajax library (jsf.js).

Regarding view parameters, Vohra explains, “JSF 2.0 added support for view parameters, which add the provision to send request parameters in a GET request. A view parameter is a UI component represented with the UIViewParameter class. Just like other UI components, it is saved in the UI component tree for a Facelets page and can be associated with validators and converters. A view parameter is an EditableValueHolder because it implements the interface.”

Preemptive navigation allows developers to determine the resource file that they  navigate to and request parameters, if needed, based on the navigation case and view parameters, thus allowing them to create a URL for JSF resources that they access from a GET request. As a result, the URL displayed shows the resource and all request parameters.

Developers should take note that plans are in the works to update Java EE 7 for “cloud-related practical considerations, such as multitenancy and elasticity, also known as horizontal scaling.” This will be available through JSR 342, which is scheduled to complete an early draft review on May 23, 2012. Specification leads are Oracle’s Bill Shannon and Linda DeMichiel.
Access the article here.

Thursday Apr 12, 2012

JavaServer Faces 2.0 for the Cloud

A new article now up on otn/java by Deepak Vohra titled “JSF 2.0 for the Cloud, Part One,” shows how JavaServer Faces 2.0 provides features ideally suited for the virtualized computing resources of the cloud. The article focuses on @ManagedBean annotation, implicit navigation, and resource handling. Vohra illustrates how the container-based model found in Java EE 7, which allows portable applications to target single machines as well as large clusters, is well suited to the cloud architecture.

From the article--

“Cloud services might not have been a factor when JavaServer Faces 2.0 (JSF 2.0) was developed, but JSF 2.0 provides features ideally suited for the cloud, for example:
•    The path-based resource handling in JSF 2.0 makes handling virtualized resources much easier and provides scalability with composite components.
•    REST-style GET requests and bookmarkable URLs in JSF 2.0 support the cloud architecture. Representational State Transfer (REST) software architecture is based on transferring the representation of resources identified by URIs. A RESTful resource or service is made available as a URI path. Resources can be accessed in various formats, such as XML, HTML, plain text, PDF, JPEG, and JSON, among others. REST offers the advantages of being simple, lightweight, and fast.
•    Ajax support in JSF 2.0 is integrable with Software as a Service (SaaS) by providing interactive browser-based Web applications.”
In Part Two of the series, Vohra will examine features such as Ajax support, view parameters, preemptive navigation, event handling, and bookmarkable URLs.

Have a look at the article here.

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