Friday Mar 15, 2013

Why, Where, and How JavaFX Makes Sense

A new article by Björn Müller, now up on otn/java, titled “Why, Where, and How JavaFX Makes Sense” incisively explores the intricacies of when, where, and how JavaFX is a good technology fit.

Müller writes:
 “Our experience proves that implementing an employee desktop front end with native technology is a valid approach and that JavaFX is a good fit.

* JavaFX is available on the leading desktop operating systems (Windows, Linux, and Mac OS X)
* Although it has gone through some painful changes, its evolution proves its vendor’s level of commitment.
* As the successor to Swing, it is being used by an increasing number of Java developers. Regardless of its future, it will benefit from a strong developer community.
* Compared to Swing, it provides a clear and clean architecture and features many enhancements: styling, event management, transitions, scene graph—to name a few.
* It provides the possibility of developing up-to-date user interfaces with animations, multitouch, and the like.
* It is based on a clear and clean language: Java.
* It provides all the professional Java tooling required to debug, analyze, profile, and log a client application.
* It enables a simple app-like installation on the client side, without any prerequisites.”

Müller provides a nuanced discussion of the kinds of architecture in which JavaFX should be embedded, its uses with JavaServer Faces, and reports on his own experiences using JavaFX.

Have a look at the article here.

Wednesday Feb 13, 2013

JavaFX Open Source Update!

Oracle has started to open source JavaFX, the rich client platform for Java applications. The list of open sourced projects will be growing in the next couple of weeks with an additional 7 projects. "We are also going to open source our iOS and Android implementations over the next couple of months" announced Richard Bair, architect of the JavaFX platform, in his blog.

Friday Nov 18, 2011

JavaFX 2.0 at Devoxx 2011

JavaFX had a big presence at Devoxx 2011 as witnessed by the number of sessions this year given by leading JavaFX movers and shakers.

  •     “JavaFX 2.0 -- A Java Developer's Guide” by Java Champions Stephen Chin and Peter Pilgrim
  •     “JavaFX 2.0 Hands On” by Jasper Potts and Richard Bair
  •     “Animation Bringing your User Interfaces to Life” by Michael Heinrichs and John Yoong (JavaFX development team)
  •     “Complete Guide to Writing Custom Bindings in JavaFX 2.0” by Michael Heinrichs (JavaFX development team)
  •     “Java Rich Clients with JavaFX 2.0” by Jasper Potts and Richard Bair
  •     “JavaFX Properties & Bindings for Experts” (and those who want to become experts) by Michael Heinrichs (JavaFX development team)
  •     “JavaFX Under the Hood” by Richard Bair
  •     “JavaFX Open Mic” with Jasper Potts and Richard Bair


With the release of JavaFX 2.0 and Oracle’s move towards an open development model with an open bug database already created, it’s a great time for developers to take the JavaFX plunge.


One Devoxx attendee, Mark Stephens, a developer at IDRsolutions blogged about a problem he was having setting up JavaFX on NetBeans to work on his Mac. He wrote:


“I’ve tried desperate measures (I even read and reread the instructions) but it did not help. Luckily, I am at Devoxx at the moment and there seem to be a lot of JavaFX gurus here (and it is running on all their Macs). So I asked them… It turns out that sometimes the software does not automatically pickup the settings like it should do if you give it the JavaFX SDK path. The solution is actually really simple (isn’t it always once you know). Enter these values manually and it will work.”


He simply entered certain values and his problem was solved. He thanked Java Champion Stephen Chin, “for a great talk at Devoxx and putting me out of my misery.”


JavaFX in Java Magazine

Over in the November/December 2011 issue of Java Magazine, Oracle’s Simon Ritter, well known for his creative Java inventions at JavaOne, has an article up titled “JavaFX and Swing Integration” in which he shows developers how to use the power of JavaFX to migrate Swing interfaces to JavaFX. The consensus among JavaFX experts is that JavaFX is the next step in the evolution of Java as a rich client platform.


In the same issue Java Champion and JavaFX maven James Weaver has an article, “Using Transitions for Animation in JavaFX 2.0”. In addition, Oracle’s Vice President of Java Client Development, Nandini Ramani, provides the keys to unlock the mysteries of JavaFX 2.0 in her Java Magazine interview.


Look for the JavaFX community to grow and flourish in coming years.

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