Tuesday Jul 14, 2015

Develop Non-Blocking Web Applications in Java

As Re Lai explains in this article, web applications have traditionally processed requests synchronously on the server side. Asynchronous programming is generally used on the client side. However, due to the advent of social networking, mobile devices, and the Internet of Things, non-blocking request processing on the server side has taken off as an important technique for meeting ever-more-daunting performance demands.

Lai's article explores the asynchronous support provided in several popular web frameworks--Servlet, JAX-RS, Spring MVC, Vert.x, and the Play Framework--for implementing non-blocking server-side request processing. He also discusses a sample application, todosapp, to show how to implement non-blocking web applications in these frameworks. Read Lai's article

Monday Dec 15, 2014

Ed Burns Discusses Servlet 4.0

Oracle Engineer and Spec Lead discusses Servlet 4.0, slated to be a part of Java EE 8. Servlet exposes HTTP to the Java Platform. Find out how you can learn the details about Servlet 4.0 and how you can get involved. Learn more on the Servlet Project Page on Java.net.

We're always adding more videos to the YouTube/Java channel.  

Tuesday Sep 02, 2014

Greg Wilkins' Jetty/Servlet Sessions at JavaOne 2014

By Guest Blogger Reza Rahman

For the Java EE track at JavaOne 2014 we are highlighting some key sessions and speakers to better inform you of what you can expect, right up until the start of the conference.

To this end we recently interviewed Greg Wilkins. Greg is the mastermind behind Jetty and a long-time key contributor to the JCP, particularly for the foundational Servlet specification. In fact Greg is likely to be instrumental in the upcoming Servlet 4 specification slated to be included in Java EE 8. He will likely be the only person in the Servlet 4 expert group that is also part of the IETF HTTP 2 working group. We wanted to talk to Greg about his Jetty/Servlet sessions at JavaOne 2014 and HTTP 2 generally:

font-family: Arial, Verdana, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; line-height: 18px;">Greg has several sessions on the track that he talked about:

  • Jetty Features: In his open-ended Birds-of-a-Feather session, Greg will share the latest features added and to be considered in Jetty.
  • Into the Wild with Servlet Async IO: In this deeply technical session, Greg will be exploring the ins-and-outs of the Servlet 3.1 asynchronous I/O feature. If this is a topic that interests you, the session is probably your best opportunity to gain knowledge from a true subject matter expert.

Bear in mind, Oracle's own Ed Burns will have a detailed session on Servlet 4/HTTP 2. Besides Greg's sessions, we have a very strong program for the Java EE track and JavaOne overall - just explore the content catalog. If you can't make it, you can be assured that we will make key content available after the conference just as we have always done.

Wednesday Feb 15, 2012

GlassFish Adds Agility to Java EE Deployment

A new article by Julien Ponge on the front page of otn/java, titled “Adding Some Agility to Java EE Application Deployment with GlassFish,” reports on four noteworthy features in GlassFish that increase agility to Java EE application deployment.

* Session data preservation across redeployments

* Servlet fragments

* Application-scoped resources

* Application versioning

The article relies on a running example called TaskEE, a simple task list application that functions as a deployable application in which tasks are stored in a volatile Web session. Ponge shows how to morph TaskEE into TaskEEPA in order to store tasks in a relational database rather than a Web session.

Directly from the article:
“Deploying and managing Java Platform, Enterprise Edition (Java EE) applications seems like a fairly established activity. Applications can be deployed, undeployed, and upgraded through a combination of deployment and undeployment. Applications use various types of resources, such as JDBC connection pools or Java Message Service (JMS) destinations. Such resources need to be created, configured, and administered using an application server means, such as configuration files, command-line tools, and graphical interfaces. While the tasks do not vary much from one Java EE application server to another, each one is free to provide a broader set of features that make the developer’s and the infrastructure team’s jobs more enjoyable.”

Read the complete article here.


Insider News from the Java Team at Oracle!



« November 2015