Wednesday Mar 28, 2012

Java Champion Jorge Vargas on Extreme Programming, Geolocalization, and Latin American Programmers

In a new interview, up on otn/java, titled “An Interview with Java Champion Jorge Vargas,” Jorge Vargas, a leading Mexican developer, discusses the process of introducing companies to Enterprise JavaBeans through the application of Extreme Programming. Among other things, he gives workshops about building code with agile techniques and creates a master project to build all apps based on Scrum, XP methods and Kanban. He focuses on building core components such as security, login, and menus. Vargas remarks, “This may sound easy, but it’s not—the process takes months and hundreds of hours, but it can be controlled, and with small iterations, we can translate customer requirements and problems of legacy systems to the new system.”

In regard to his work with geolocalization, he says: “We have launched a beta program of Yumbling, a geolocalization-based app, with mobile clients for BlackBerry, iPhone, Android, and Nokia, with a Web interface. The first challenge was to design a simple universal mechanism providing information to all clients and to minimize maintenance provision to them. I try not to generalize a lot—to avoid low performance or misunderstanding in processing data. We use the latest Java EE technology—during the last five years, I’ve taught people how to use Java EE efficiently.”

Check out the interview here.


Friday Feb 17, 2012

Michael Hüttermann on Agile ALM

A new interview on otn/java with Java Champion and Agile ALM expert Michael Hüttermann titled “Agile ALM: A Conversation with Java Champion and ALM Expert Michael Hüttermann,” explores ways to streamline the software development process through strategies that include task-based development, continuous integration, practical Scrum implementation, and more.

In the interview, Hüttermann explains the purpose of Agile ALM:

“Agile ALM provides structure for Agile. It’s up to the people who implement Agile ALM to apply Agile values (such as respect and open communication), Agile strategies (such as continuous integration, continuous inspection, and continuous deployment), and Agile processes (such as Scrum). It’s very important to be open-minded regarding the tools you use and to be free to switch from one tool to another. This is part of the continuous improvement process in which developers reflect continuously about what the team is doing and how to improve.”

He goes on to explore the strengths of different tool chains:

“One appealing tool chain integrates JIRA, Hudson, Eclipse, Mylyn, and FishEye. This tool chain fosters task-based development spanning different project roles and project phases. Another interesting chain is to connect Java with Scala and Groovy in order to leverage specific features of different languages on the Java Virtual Machine (JVM). This can be helpful, for example, for setting up an environment for specifying and developing software collaboratively. Scala, with the specs2 library, and Groovy, with the easyb library, are examples of writing acceptance tests or applying behavior-driven development on the JVM where programmers and testers share the same infrastructure and are, thus, forced to work together closely.”

Read the complete article here.

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