Friday Oct 12, 2012

JavaOne 2012 in Review

Noted freelance writer Steve Meloan has a new article up on otn/java, titled, “JavaOne 2012 Review: Make the Future Java” in which he summarizes the happenings at JavaOne 2012.

Along the way, he reminds us that if the future turns out to be anything like the past, Java will do fine:

The repeated theme for this year's conference was ‘Make the Future Java,’ and according to recent stats, the groundwork is already firmly in place:

    There are 9 million Java developers worldwide.
    Three billion devices run Java.
    Five billion Java Cards are in use.
    One hundred percent of Blu-ray Disc players ship with Java.
    Ninety-seven percent of enterprise desktops run Java.
    Eighty-nine percent of PC desktops run Java.

This year's content curriculum program was organized under seven technical tracks:

    Core Java Platform
    Development Tools and Techniques
    Emerging Languages on the JVM
    Enterprise Service Architectures and the Cloud
    Java EE Web Profile and Platform Technologies
    Java ME, Java Card, Embedded, and Devices
    JavaFX and Rich User Experiences”

Meloan artfully reminds us of how JavaOne makes learning fun.

Have a look at the article here.

Wednesday Jun 20, 2012

Expressing the UI for Enterprise Applications with JavaFX 2.0 FXML - Part One

A new article, the first of two parts, now up on otn/java by Oracle Evangelist and JavaFX expert, James L. Weaver, titled “Expressing the UI for Enterprise Applications with JavaFX 2.0 FXML, Part One,” shows developers how to leverage the power of the FX Markup Language (FXML) to define the UI in enterprise applications.

As Weaver explains, “JavaFX 2.0 is an API and runtime for creating Rich Internet Applications (RIAs). JavaFX was introduced in 2007, and version 2.0 was released in October 2011. One of the advantages of JavaFX 2.0 is that the code can be written in the Java language using mature and familiar tools.”

He goes on to show how to use the potential of FX Markup Language, which comes with JavaFX 2.0, to efficiently define the user interface for enterprise applications. FXML functions to enable the expression of the UI using XML. “Classes that contain FXML functionality are located in the javafx.fxml package,” says Weaver, “and they include FXMLLoader, JavaFXBuilderFactory, and an interface named Initializable.”

Weaver’s article offers a sample application that shows how to use the capabilities of FXML and JavaFX 2.0 to create an enterprise app.

Have a look at the article here.

Monday Oct 17, 2011

JavaFX 2.0 Arrives and is Open Sourced

JavafxAmong the big news at JavaOne 2011 was the release of JavaFX 2.0 and announcement of its open source status. As Oracle’s Chief Architect, Client Java Platform Richard Bair observed, “We think this is going to be a really big deal in the industry.” JavaFX 2.0, touted as the next step in the evolution of Java as a rich client platform, is designed to provide a modern Java environment that shortens development time and eases the deployment of data driven-business and enterprise client applications.

 

Its key features include:

 

• Java APIs for JavaFX

 

• FXML -- an XML-based markup language for defining user interfaces

 

• Seamless integration into Swing applications

 

• High-performance hardware accelerated graphics

 

• Embedding of web content into JavaFX

 

• High-performance media engine

 

• Improved UI controls library

 

JavaFX 2.0 enables developers to leverage their existing Java skills and tools to develop JavaFX applications. It offers a clean separation of application UI and logic and simplifies code maintenance while integrating Web content and media seamlessly in Java applications. Developers can more easily create scalable, graphics-rich applications without performance penalties, build sophisticated user interfaces, extend existing Swing applications, and deploy applications in the browser, as desktop, or Web Start applications.

 

Java APIs for JavaFX include:

 

• End-to-end Java development

 

• Java language features—generics, annotations, multi-threading

 

• Reduced static footprint of runtime and applications

 

• Fluent API design for UI construction

 

• Development in alternative languages (e.g., JRuby, Groovy) with JavaFX

 

• Leverage sophisticated Java IDEs, debuggers and profilers

 

• Java APIs preserve convenient JavaFX Script features (e.g., bind)

 

Other features to take note of in JavaFX 2.0:

 

FXML

 

• Scriptable, XML-based markup language for defining user interfaces

 

• Convenient alternative to developing UI programmatically in Java

 

• Easy to learn and intuitive for developers familiar with web technologies or other markup based UI technologies

 

• Powerful scripting feature allows embedding scripts within a FXML file. Any JVM scripting language can be used, including JavaScript, Groovy, and Clojure, among others

 

New Graphics Pipeline for Modern GPUs

 

• New hardware accelerated graphics pipeline (Prism)

 

• New windowing toolkit (Glass) for Prism

 

• Java2D software pipeline for unsupported graphics hardware

 

• High-level support for making rich graphics simple: Shadows, Blurs, Reflections, Effects, 2D and 3D transforms

 

 

Rich Set of UI Controls

 

• Over 50 components for form-based UI, including charts, layout and form controls

 

• CSS3+ skinning and layout of UI controls

 

• Advanced UI controls, including table, tree view, rich text editor

 

 

Web Component

 

• Embed Web content in JavaFX applications

 

• HTML and JavaScript rendering based on Webkit

 

• DOM access and manipulation from Java

 

 

Browser Plug-in Refreshed for JavaFX 2.0

 

• Loading of JavaFX applets based on Prism

 

• Preloader for JavaFX applets for improved user experience

 

 

Powerful Properties Model

 

• New collections ObservableList, Sequence and ObservableMap

 

• New design and implementation of bean properties

 

• Low level binding API for high performance, low footprint bindings

 

• High level binding API for simple usage

 

 

Improved Animation Engine

 

• Optimized implementation of transitions

 

• Complete overhaul of API to simplify usage and in preparation of optimized and more stable implementation

 

 

Approximately 50 JavaFX 2.0 sessions can be found at JavaOne given by leading JavaFX movers and shakers. JavaFX is the next step in the evolution of Java as a rich client platform. Congratulations to all involved!  


Wednesday Jul 13, 2011

Understanding the Java 7 Fork/Join Framework

An incisive and timely article by Julien Ponge, an Associate Professor in computer science at INSA de Lyon, titled “Fork and Join: Java Can Excel at Painless Parallel Programming, Too!” offers a detailed exploration of the new Java 7 fork/join framework. It begins with an explanation of low-level mechanisms involved in Java concurrent programming, then explores the rich primitives of the java.util.concurrent packages, and presents fork/join tasks plus example usage of the new APIs.

From the article itself:

“To illustrate the usage of the new fork/join framework, let us take a simple example in which we will count the occurrences of a word in a set of documents. First and foremost, fork/join tasks should operate as “pure” in-memory algorithms in which no I/O operations come into play. Also, communication between tasks through shared state should be avoided as much as possible, because that implies that locking might have to be performed. Ideally, tasks communicate only when one task forks another or when one task joins another.”

Read the complete article.

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