Friday Jul 19, 2013

Java API for JSON Processing: An Introduction to JSON

A new article, now up on otn/java, by Oracle’s Jitandra Kotamraju, titled “Java API for JSON Processing: An Introduction to JSON,” takes a look at how Java API for JSON Processing provides portable APIs to parse, generate, transform and query JSON, also known as JavaScript Object Notation. Kotamraju, a principal member of the technical staff at Oracle, is the JSON Processing specification lead.

JSO, a lightweight, text-based, language-independent data exchange format that is easy to read and write by both humans and machines, can represent two structured types: objects and arrays. Kotamraju, the JSON Processing specification lead, explains that “an object is an unordered collection of zero or more name/value pairs. An array is an ordered sequence of zero or more values. The values can be strings, numbers, booleans, null and these two structured types.”

JSON is frequently used in Ajax applications, configurations, databases, and RESTful web services. JSON is offered as the data exchange format with their RESTful web services by all popular websites.

Kotamraju gets under the hood with both the object model and streaming APIs. He concludes that the API for JSON Processing offers the following capabilities:
* “Parsing input streams into immutable objects or event streams
* Writing event streams or immutable objects to output streams
* Programmatically navigating immutable objects
* Programmatically building immutable objects with builders”

The API forms a base for building data binding, transformation, querying, or other manipulation APIs. JAX-RS 2.0 provides native integration for the Java API for JSON Processing.

Check out the article here.

Monday Apr 08, 2013

Technical Article: Java EE 7 and JAX-RS 2.0

A new article by Java Champion Adam Bien, titled “Java EE 7 and JAX-RS 2.0” is up on otn/java. The article demonstrates how Java EE 7 with JAX-RS 2.0 has several new useful features which further simplify development, and lead to the creation of more sophisticated Java SE/EE RESTful applications.

Using a Java-friendly, but simplistic JAX-RS 2.0 example Bien takes the reader through aspects, request interception, client and configuration issues and much more. He concludes the article as follows:

“Interestingly, JAX-RS does not even require a full-fledged application server. After fulfilling the specified Context Types, a JAX-RS 2.0–compliant API can be anything. However, the combination with EJB 3.2 brings asynchronous processing, pooling (and so throttling), and monitoring. Tight integration with Servlet 3+ comes with efficient asynchronous processing of @Suspended responses through AsyncContext support and CDI runtime brings eventing. Also Bean Validation is well integrated and can be used for validation of resource parameters. Using JAX-RS 2.0 together with other Java EE 7 APIs brings the most convenient (=no configuration) and most productive (=no re-invention) way of exposing objects to remote systems.”

Check out the article here.

Tuesday Jul 03, 2012

The Enterprise Side of JavaFX: Part Two

A new article, part of a three-part series, now up on the front page of otn/java, by Java Champion Adam Bien, titled “The Enterprise Side of JavaFX,” shows developers how to implement the LightView UI dashboard with JavaFX 2. Bien explains that “the RESTful back end of the LightView application comes with a rudimentary HTML page that is used to start/stop the monitoring service, set the snapshot interval, and activate/deactivate the GlassFish monitoring capabilities.”

He explains that “the configuration view implemented in the org.lightview.view.Browser component is needed only to start or stop the monitoring process or set the monitoring interval.”

Bien concludes his article with a general summary of the principles applied:

“JavaFX encourages encapsulation without forcing you to build models for each visual component. With the availability of bindable properties, the boundary between the view and the model can be reduced to an expressive set of bindable properties. Wrapping JavaFX components with ordinary Java classes further reduces the complexity. Instead of dealing with low-level JavaFX mechanics all the time, you can build simple components and break down the complexity of the presentation logic into understandable pieces. CSS skinning further helps with the separation of the code that is needed for the implementation of the presentation logic and the visual appearance of the application on the screen. You can adjust significant portions of an application's look and feel directly in CSS files without touching the actual source code.”

Check out the article here.

Wednesday Sep 21, 2011

Experts from Oracle and the Community at Silicon Valley Code Camp!

Silicon Valley Code Camp (Oct. 8 & 9) is a community-driven developer conference. Developers will learn from their fellow developers in 212 sessions about code, of course, but also about legal issues, branding and community building. Experts from Oracle and the community are sharing their technical know-how during those 2 days in session formats ranging from informal discussions to presentations.

Conveniently scheduled on the weekend with a free entrance, the conference has become more popular over the years and has 1,787 registered this year. The support of many sponsors makes this conference happen and this year Oracle is a platinum sponsor.


Oracle Experts

Pieter Humphrey

In-memory session replication with WebLogic and GlassFish, Coherence 

http://blogs.oracle.com/devtools

Sun., Oct. 9 –  10:45am  

An engineer's introduction to in-memory data grid development

http://blogs.oracle.com/devtools

Sun., Oct. 9 – 9:15am


Patrick Curran

JCP and the Future of Java

http://htp://jcp.org

Sun., Oct. 9– 9:45am


Juan Camilo Ruiz

Extending the JSF controller for reusability

Sun., Oct. 9 - 2:45pm


Arun Gupta

The Java EE 7 Platform: Developing for the Cloud

http://blogs.sun.com/arungupta

Sat., Oct. 8 - 11:15am

Deploy and Monitor your Java EE 6 session in a fully-clustered GlassFish

http://blogs.sun.com/arungupta

Sat., Oct. 8 - 9:45pm


Todd Farmer

Building Java Applications for MySQL

Sun., Oct. 9h – 1:15pm


Simon Law

High-Performance SQL Applications Using In-Memory Database Technology

Sun., Oct. 9h –  10:45am

Experts from the Community

Stephen Chin

JavaFX 2.0 With Alternative Languages-

Groovy, Clojure, Scala, Fantom, and Visage

http://steveonjava.com/

Sat., Oct. 8h – 11:15am


John David Duncan

MySQL Cluster With and Without SQL

http://mysqlblog.lenoxway.net

Sat., Oct. 8h – 1:45pm


Peter Pilgrim

Progressive Enhanced JavaFX 2.0 Custom Components

http://www.xenonique.co.uk/blog/

Sat., Oct. 8th – 5:00pm


Prashant Deva

Chronon - DVR for Java

http://www.chrononsystems.com

Sat., Oct. 8h – 11:15am


Slava Imeshev

Best Practices for Scaling Java Applications

with Distributed Caching

http://www.cacheonix.com

Sun., Oct. 9h – 1:15pm


Manish Pandit

Play! as you REST : Using Play! Framework

to build RESTful services

http://twitter.com/lobster1234

Sat., Oct. 8th – 1:45pm





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