Monday Sep 10, 2012

Expressing the UI for Enterprise Applications with JavaFX 2.0 FXML - Part Two

A new article by Oracle’s Java Champion Jim Weaver, titled “Expressing the UI for Enterprise Applications with JavaFX 2.0 FXML -- Part Two,” now up on otn/java, shows developers how to leverage the power of the FX Markup Language to define the UI for enterprise applications. Weaver, the author of Pro JavaFX Platform, extends the SearchDemoFXML example used in Part One to include more concepts and techniques for creating an enterprise application using FXML.

Weaver concludes the article by summarizing its content, “FXML provides the ability to radically change the UI without modifying the controller. This task can be accomplished by loading different FXML documents, leveraging JavaFX cascading style sheets, and creating localized resource bundles. Named parameters can be used with these features to provide relevant information to an application at startup.”


Check out the article here.





Thursday Apr 12, 2012

JavaServer Faces 2.0 for the Cloud

A new article now up on otn/java by Deepak Vohra titled “JSF 2.0 for the Cloud, Part One,” shows how JavaServer Faces 2.0 provides features ideally suited for the virtualized computing resources of the cloud. The article focuses on @ManagedBean annotation, implicit navigation, and resource handling. Vohra illustrates how the container-based model found in Java EE 7, which allows portable applications to target single machines as well as large clusters, is well suited to the cloud architecture.

From the article--

“Cloud services might not have been a factor when JavaServer Faces 2.0 (JSF 2.0) was developed, but JSF 2.0 provides features ideally suited for the cloud, for example:
•    The path-based resource handling in JSF 2.0 makes handling virtualized resources much easier and provides scalability with composite components.
•    REST-style GET requests and bookmarkable URLs in JSF 2.0 support the cloud architecture. Representational State Transfer (REST) software architecture is based on transferring the representation of resources identified by URIs. A RESTful resource or service is made available as a URI path. Resources can be accessed in various formats, such as XML, HTML, plain text, PDF, JPEG, and JSON, among others. REST offers the advantages of being simple, lightweight, and fast.
•    Ajax support in JSF 2.0 is integrable with Software as a Service (SaaS) by providing interactive browser-based Web applications.”
In Part Two of the series, Vohra will examine features such as Ajax support, view parameters, preemptive navigation, event handling, and bookmarkable URLs.

Have a look at the article here.

Thursday Jun 02, 2011

Managing Resources with Java 7

A very clear and detailed article by Julien Ponge, titled “Better Resource Management with Java SE 7: Beyond Syntactic Sugar,” presents the Java 7 answer to the automatic resource management problem in the form of a new language construct, proposed as part of Project Coin, called the try-with-resources statement.

Java applications frequently manipulate different types of resources such as files, streams, sockets, and database connections that require system resources for their operations. They must be managed with great care or risk having database connections and file descriptors remain open after an exception occurs elsewhere in the code. As a result, application servers may need frequent restarts due to resource exhaustion.

The article provides an overview of resource and exception management before explaining the essentials of try-with-resources statements. It then shows how a class can be made ready to support such statements, and concludes with a demystification of the syntactic sugar behind the language extension.

Ponge concludes that the try-with-resources construct “generates correct code on behalf of the developer, eliminating the need to write boilerplate code that is easy to get wrong. More importantly, this change has been accompanied with evolutions to attach one exception to another, thus providing an elegant solution to the well-known problem of exceptions masking each other.”

Read the rest of the article here.

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