Monday Oct 14, 2013

JavaOne 2013 Review: Java Takes on the Internet of Things

A new article, now up on otn/java titled “JavaOne 2013 Review: Java Takes on the Internet of Things,” takes a look back at the lively happenings at JavaOne 2013, which reprised the 2012 JavaOne "Make the Future Java" theme. The articles quotes JavaOne keynoter Peter Utzschneider, Vice President, Java Product Management at Oracle, who said, "There is a lot going on in the industry, with massive shifts and innovation happening which pose huge challenges and opportunities for Java."

He observed that Oracle shares a common goal with the Java community—to make Java better, stronger, more robust, and relevant for decades to come.

The article reviews the extraordinary success of the Java platform:
* There are 9 million Java developers worldwide.
* It's the #1 choice for developers.
* It's the #1 development platform.
* 3 billion mobile phones run Java.
* 100 percent of Blu-ray disc players ship with Java.
* 97 percent of enterprise desktops run Java.
* 5 billion Java Cards are in use.
* 7 billion Java Cards have been sold.
* 89 percent of desktops run Java.
* 125 million TV devices run Java.
* Five of the top-five OEMs ship Java.

A central theme of JavaOne 2013 was how Java makes a perfect fit for the coming Internet of Things (IoT):

“First,” the article points out, “the Internet of Things (IoT) is here to stay and is likely to alter our daily lives in coming years. As embedded devices get cheaper, more powerful, and more connected, and as the IoT grows, Java developers will face radical new challenges—not the least of which is security. Along with this, cloud computing has taken hold, complementing the IoT and making big and fast data available and ready to be analyzed.”

Nandini Ramani, VP of Engineering, Java Client and Embedded Platforms, Oracle, pointed out that the Java platform is in the process of being unified: "First, Moore's Law is making devices more capable. Second, Java SE is being shrunk to fit into the embedded space and smaller devices. And third, Java ME is being brought up to be in parity with Java SE."

Find out about the Duke’s Choice and Java Community Process Awards, the JavaOne DEMOgrounds, the JavaOne Codegarten and much more.
Link to it here.

Tuesday Sep 24, 2013

The Eleventh Annual Java Community Process Program Awards

by Timothy Beneke and Janice J. Heiss

In a festive room teeming with over 200 people, including many celebrated Java luminaries,
along with excellent food and drink, the 9th annual JCP Program Awards were handed out atop the majestic Hilton Hotel on Monday night. As the JCP states, “The Java Community Process (JCP) program celebrates success. Members of the community nominate worthy participants, Spec Leads, and Java Specification Requests (JSRs) in order to cheer on the hard work and creativity that produces ground-breaking results for the community and industry in the Java Standard Edition (SE), Java Enterprise Edition (EE), or Java Micro Edition (ME) platforms.”

The JCP added a new awards category this year for Adopt-a-JSR program participants, bringing the total to four: JCP Member/Participant of the Year, Outstanding Spec Lead, Most Significant JSR, and Outstanding Adopt-a-JSR Participant.

The room was full of good cheer, playful humor, a music band of Java developers, and enthusiastic appreciation of much that has been accomplished on behalf of Java technology in the previous year.

The nominees and winners in their respective categories were:

JCP Member/Participant of the Year

--Azul Systems, Gil Tene

--London Java Community (LJC), Ben Evans, Martijn Verburg, Richard Warburton, Graham Allan

--Mohamed Taman

The winner was Azul System’s Gil Tene. The JCP said, “Gil has worked diligently to provide clear advice on matters of Software Patents, IP and licensing that seeks to benefit both non-profits/individuals etc as well as organizations with vested commercial interests in Java. It's not easy delving into the depths of the legal aspects and the potential impacts of changes to the JCP, but with help from folks like Gil we're hopeful for a solid and fair outcome.”

Tene characterized his approach to the JCP as follows: “I represent Azul Systems on the JCP EC, but I try to apply an approach of ‘do the right thing first’ in my choices and positions. Coming from a small company that depends on Java and its ecosystem for its livelihood, I see my role as representing the interests of an entire sector of non-big-company commercial folks and of individual and professional developers out there, and providing some offset and balance to the normal mix of such boards.”

Outstanding Spec Lead

--Brian Goetz, Oracle

--Jitendra Kotamraju, Oracle

--Anatole Tresch, Credit Suisse

--Chris Vignola, IBM

The winner, Oracle’s Brian Goetz, was recognized, “For tirelessly working away at an incredibly complex JSR - JSR 335, Lambda Expressions for the Java Programming Language. From a community point of view, we've appreciated his willingness to listen and consider ideas from other technologists as well as spending time with groups of developers to understand the impact of Lambdas on Java.”

Goetz offered a statement in response to the award for his leadership in creating Lambda Expressions for the Java Language, which also won for most significant JSR. He said that lambdas, “represent a coordinated co-evolution of the Java SE platform, including the VM, language, and core libraries to provide developers with a powerful upgrade -- quite likely the largest ever -- to the Java SE programming model. We started this JSR in early 2010, but the topic of closures-in-Java had already been in play in the community for many years prior, and, of course, there was a broad diversity of opinions as to what direction, how far, and how fast to evolve the Java programming model. In the end, the most significant dimension of the challenge turned out to be: how do we integrate these new features in the language and libraries without them feeling grafted on after-the-fact. I think developers will find programming with this ‘new and improved Java’ to be a very pleasant experience -- I know I have.”

Most Significant JSR

--JSR 335, Lambda Expressions for the Java Programming Language

--JSR 344, JavaServer Faces (JSF) 2.2

--JSR 352, Batch Applications for the Java Platform

--JSR 354, Money and Currency API

--JSR 355, JCP Executive Committee Merge

The winner, as previously mentioned, was JSR 335, Lambda Expressions for the Java Programming Language, which the JCP praised as follows:

“This brings Java kicking and screaming into the modern programming language age and is seen as a catalyst for the second age of Java. It's underlying discoveries and improvements with regards to Type Inference has also resulted in a stronger JVM for all.”

Spec lead Brian Goetz, in picking up the award, remarked, “This is something we’ve been working on for three-and-a-half-years and it’s nice to be looking at it through the rear-view mirror.”

Outstanding Adopt-a-JSR Participant

--BeJUG, Johan Vos

--CeJUG, Helio Frota, Hildeberto Mendonça

--JUG Chennai, Rajmahendra (Raj) Hegde

--Morocco JUG and EGJUG, Mohamed Taman, Faissal Boutaounte

The winner was Morocco JUG and EGJUG, Mohamed Taman, and Faissal Boutaounte, who were praised, “For adopting JSR 339, JAX-RS 2.0 specification, along with many other JSRs. One JIRA issue filed by Morocco JUG on JSR 339 was classified as a ‘release-stopper’. A quick JIRA search using the ‘adoptajsr’ tag shows that most of the JIRA issues have been created by MoroccoJUG members. Several presentations and source code have been organized by these groups. Mohamed presented sessions about the upcoming technologies to widen the range of users in the future, especially Java EE 7 JSRs and spreading of community progress and contributions that make us encouraged to participate. Mohamed sent a clear message that Africa is here and is full of talented people who are willing to take it to the next level. Mohamed was responsible for translating an Arabic Adopt-s-JSR web page to allow more Arabs to participate.”

Taman said that, “Currently, I hold two positions, one as a Business Solutions Systems Architect and design supervisor and Java Team leader, at a big financial services company in Egypt, which affects all the country by building solutions affecting Egyptians every day, by providing more facilities for businesses and enhancing the economy… I am passionate about Java. I really love it and have fun coding, and love seeing it grow, day by day, as if it were my kid.”

The Annual Java Community Process Program Awards at  JavaOne is an event and party not to be missed!

The Java Community Process

Friday Feb 22, 2013

Arun Gupta on Higher Productivity from Embracing HTML5 with Java EE 7

Oracle’s Java evangelist and noted Java EE expert, Arun Gupta, presented a session at the annual IOUC (International Oracle User Community) Summit, held January 14–16, 2013, at Oracle headquarters in Redwood Shores, California, where more than 100 top user group leaders from around the world gathered to share best practices, provide feedback, and receive updates from leading Oracle developers.

Gupta’s talk, titled "The Java EE 7 Platform: Higher Productivity and Embracing HTML5," presented a glimpse into the rich possibilities that will be available in Java EE 7 upon its release in the spring of 2013. He covered several major developments, including:

* Java API for RESTful Web Services 2.0
* Java Message Service 2.0
* Java API for JSON Processing 1.0
* Java API for WebSocket 1.0
* Bean Validation 1.1
* Batch Applications for the Java Platform 1.0
* Java Persistence API 2.1
* Servlet 3.1
* Concurrency Utilities for Java EE 1.0
* JavaServer Faces 2.2

Gupta focuses on ways in which Java EE 7 offers higher productivity; less boilerplate; richer functionality; more default options; and HTML5 support in the form of WebSocket and JSON. He also observed that the cloud is in need of more standards. From the article:

"There are not enough standards in the cloud with W3C and other standards bodies. More standards are needed so that we can define a Java API for the cloud. Premature standardization can also be a problem if not enough innovation has taken place. So what is the right thing for the platform? We have reached out to the community, the core group members, and the executive committee of the Java Community Process and have focused on providing higher productivity and on embracing the HTML5 platform more closely. We are going to use dependency injection a lot more, which will give developers the ability to write less boilerplate code and offer richer functionality such as batch applications and caching. Similarly, for HTML5, we are embracing WebSocket functionality and the ability to parse and generate a JSON structure. We are providing support for HTML5-friendly markup as part of JSF.”

Gupta summarized the strengths of the various JSRs and closed by encouraging developers to participate in Adopt-a-JSR, a project that enables them to, “pursue their interest in particular Java EE 7 JSRs and download code, play with it, report bugs, and offer feedback to Java EE 7 specification leads.”

Check out the article here.

Monday Oct 17, 2011

The Ninth Annual Java Community Process Program Awards

In a festive room full of Java luminaries and fine food at JavaOne 2011, the 9th annual JCP Program Awards were handed out Tuesday night at the Anzu Restaurant of the Nikko Hotel. The award categories were: JCP Member/Participant of the Year; Most Innovative JSR; and Outstanding Spec Lead.

The nominees in their respective categories were:

JCP Member/Participant of the Year

--Mike DeNicola, of Fujitsu, for his role as JCP.next Working Group Lead: While not officially Spec Lead of JSR 348, Mike has contributed a lot in getting the JCP reform plans where they are at a great pace, compared to earlier efforts. Helping the JCP to be fit for the next decades of Java following the Oracle-Sun merger.

--SouJava: For tirelessly promoting the JCP, JSRs, openness, transparency and our community at large (to say nothing of Bruno Souza's marvelous cape!).

--IBM: For their participation in the OpenJDK project, which has significantly increased the momentum of Java SE.   

--London Java Community: For their efforts to involve the developer community in the activities of the JCP.   

--Doug Lea: After a long and distinguished tenure on the JCP EC, Doug Lea (along with Tim Peierls and The Apache Software Foundation) felt he had no choice but to resign at the end of 2010. In doing so, he demonstrated integrity, independence, and courage that truly sets him apart. If the JCP is to retain any shred of legitimacy and relevance in the future, it will be through the actions other members who display the traits exemplified by Doug: integrity, independence, and courage, coupled with unparalleled technical expertise and a genuine love for the Java ecosystem.

Most Innovative JSR

--JSR 321: Trusted Computing API for Java. Beside a picture book example for Agile and Transparent Expert Group work, JSR 321 also anticipated another vision of JCP.next, by being the first JSR with a known implementation in a language other than Java, called Hybrid JSR by JCP.next (Part 2 and beyond). Apart from all that, Trusted Java holds the key to a safer more reliable and trusted usage of PaaS/Cloud or other Pervasive Technologies like Social Networking and Mobile.

--JSR 334: Small Enhancements to the Java Programming Language (Project Coin): Due to the process it was run under and the requirement of participants to 'put some skin in the game'.

--JSR 292:  Supporting Dynamically Typed Languages on the Java Platform: As the first JSR specifically designed to support languages other than Java, JSR 292 will ensure the long-term success of the Java VM.

Outstanding Spec Lead

--John Rose: (JSR 292 Supporting Dynamically Typed Languages on the Java Platform) Due to his excellence in ensuring consensus across the community -- both EG members and the wider JVM language community.

--Alex Buckley: (JSR 901, Java Language Specification and JSR 924: Java Virtual Machine Specification.) For his leadership.

--Mark Reinhold: For his leadership and promotion of the first Java SE platform JSR in several years.

The Winners

JCP Member/Participant of the Year: Mike DeNicola of Fujitsu

Most Innovative JSR: JSR 292, John Rose, Oracle, spec lead for JSR 292

Outstanding Spec Lead: John Rose, Oracle: JSR 292 Supporting Dynamically Typed Languages on the Java Platform


Community Leadership Award

Finally, the JCP Executive Committee gave a special Community Leadership Award to  Patrick Curran, Chair, Java Community Process, Oracle, who was recognized for the fabulous job he has done coping with a period of substantial change and conflict in the JCP over the past 18 months.

Obviously, the work of John Rose and his team was singularly honored. But as Rose himself graciously emphasized, it was itself a great honor to be counted among his fellow nominees.

Congratulations to all involved!

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