Thursday Dec 19, 2013

Java Rocks More Than Ever

In a series of blogs full of technical detail and cross-platform comparison, senior developer Geert Bevin from ZeroTurnaround gives 10 reasons why Java is a great technology. He built software for musical instruments using C++, with Juce Library and CPython, and realized that he missed a lot from the Java ecosystem.

He has written the first six blogs, which include Java Compiler, the core API, Open Source, the Java Memory Model, HighPerformance VM and Bytecode. In his first blog about Java Compiler, he gives examples and recommendations on how to use the JVM's just-in-time, the compiler code versus the architecture, runtime rather than static or dynamic linking. 

Upcoming topics include: 
Intelligent IDEs
Profiling Tools
Backwards Compatibility
Maturity With Innovation

Friday Aug 16, 2013

Java Magazine July/August is All About Peformance

The July/August issue of Java Magazine is all about performance. A prime example: Twitter. Learn how Twitter migrated to the JVM and now supports (at last count) 400 million tweets a day. How Oracle Team USA relies on a wireless Java system for real-time data to improve performance on the racecourse. How MapReduce allows Java developers to write programs to process, transform, and derive insights from petabyte size datasets. mag cover

Also in this issue:

  • JavaOne Preview - Get ready for JavaOne! The conference returns to San Francisco, September 22–26.
  • Understanding the Java Hotspot VM Code Cache 
  • Q&A: Java Performance Tuning - A talk with Kirk Pepperdine.
  • Java 8: Lambdas - Get to know lambda expressions with Ted Neward.
  • NetBeans IDE - Learn how to use NetBeans IDE to take advantage of Java EE 7.

Java Magazine is a FREE, bi-monthly, online publication. It includes technical articles on the Java language and platform; Java innovations and innovators; JUG and JCP news; Java events; links to online Java communities; and videos and multimedia demos. Subscriptions are free, registration required.

Do you have feedback about Java Magazine? Send a tweet to @oraclejavamag.

Wednesday Apr 10, 2013

Java on SPARC T5-8 Servers is FAST

Watching the boats practicing on San Francisco Bay for the America's Cup reminds me that fast is fun!  Did you know that Oracle just announced world record Java benchmarks with SPARC T5 and Solaris?  

The Details

Oracle produced a world record SPECjEnterprise2010 benchmark result of 57,422.17 SPECjEnterprise2010 EjOPS using Oracle's SPARC T5-8 server in the application tier and another SPARC T5-8 server for the database tier. This result demonstrated less than 1 second response time for all SPECjEnterprise2010 transactions, while demonstrating a sustained load of Java EE 5 transactions equivalent to 468,000 users. A SPARC T5-8 has 8 chips, 128 cores, and runs a 3.6 GHz SPARC T5CPU. Translation: If you get some SPARC T5-8 servers, you can run your Java applications really, really fast.

About the Benchmark

SPECjEnterprise2010 is the third generation of the SPEC organization's J2EE end-to-end industry standard benchmark application. The new SPECjEnterprise2010 benchmark has been re-designed and developed to cover the Java EE 5 specification's significantly expanded and simplified programming model, highlighting the major features used by developers in the industry today. This provides a real world workload driving the Application Server's implementation of the Java EE specification to its maximum potential and allowing maximum stressing of the underlying hardware and software systems:

  • The web zone, servlets, and web services
  • The EJB zone
  • JPA 1.0 Persistence Model
  • JMS and Message Driven Beans
  • Transaction management
  • Database connectivity

Moreover, SPECjEnterprise2010 also heavily exercises all parts of the underlying infrastructure that make up the application environment, including hardware, JVM software, database software, JDBC drivers, and the system network.

Learn More

Blog: SPARC T5-8 w/ Oracle Solaris Delivers SPECjEnterprise2010 Benchmark World Record Performance
Blog: SPARC T5-2 w/ Oracle Solaris Achieves SPECjbb2013 Benchmark World Record Result
White Paper: Oracle Solaris: The Best Platform for Enterprise Java (PDF) 
Complete Results at SPEC.org: SPECjEnterprise2010

Tuesday Jan 08, 2013

Java Experts on the State of Java

In a new article by yours truly, now up on otn/java, titled “Java Experts on the State of Java,” four Java experts, Adam Bien, Charles Nutter, Kirk Pepperdine and Simon Ritter, share their unique perspectives on what’s happening in the world of Java.

Consultant Adam Bien, winner of many awards and an expert in Java EE, remarks that, “Only a few years ago, Java EE was used mostly by larger companies—now it becomes interesting even for one-person shows.” He is also excited about Project Nashorn, which is coming in Java SE 8.

Charles Nutter, co-creator of JRuby and a Java Champion, observes that “JRuby seems to have hit a tipping point this past year, moving from ‘just another Ruby implementation’ to ‘the best Ruby implementation for X,’ where X may be performance, scaling, big data, stability, reliability, security, or one of several other features important for today’s applications.”

Java Champion Kirk Pepperdine, an expert in Java performance tuning, comments that, “The volume of data we’re dealing with just seems to be getting bigger and bigger all the time. A couple of years ago, you’d never think of needing a heap that was 64 GB, but today there are deployments in which the heap has grown to 256 GB, and there are plans for heaps that are even larger. Dealing with all that data simply requires more horsepower and some very specialized techniques. In some cases, teams are simply trying to push hardware to the breaking point. Under those conditions, you need to be very clever just to get things to work—let alone to get them to be fast. We are very quickly moving from a world where everything happens in a transaction to one in which you’ve lost if you even consider using a transaction.”

Finally, Oracle’s Java Rock Star Simon Ritter celebrates the Raspberry Pi: “I don’t think there is one definitive thing that makes the Raspberry Pi significant, but a combination of things really makes it stand out. First, it’s the cost: $35 for what is effectively a completely usable computer. OK, so you have to add a power supply; an SD card for storage; and maybe a screen, keyboard, and mouse, but this is still way cheaper than a typical PC. The choice of an ARM processor is also significant, because it avoids problems such as cooling (no heat sink or fan) and can use a USB power brick.”

Check out the article here.

Sunday Sep 30, 2012

Talking JavaOne with Rock Star Kirk Pepperdine

Kirk Pepperdine is not only a JavaOne Rock Star but a Java Champion and a highly regarded expert in Java performance tuning who works as a consultant, educator, and author. He is the principal consultant at Kodewerk Ltd. He speaks frequently at conferences and co-authored the Ant Developer's Handbook. In the rapidly shifting world of information technology, Pepperdine, as much as anyone, keeps up with what's happening with Java performance tuning.

Pepperdine will participate in the following sessions:

  • CON5405 - Are Your Garbage Collection Logs Speaking to You?
  • BOF6540 - Java Champions and JUG Leaders Meet Oracle Executives (with Jeff Genender, Mattias Karlsson, Henrik Stahl, Georges Saab)
  • HOL6500 - Finding and Solving Java Deadlocks (with Heinz Kabutz, Ellen Kraffmiller Martijn Verburg, Jeff Genender, and Henri Tremblay)


I asked him what technological changes need to be taken into account in performance tuning. “The volume of data we're dealing with just seems to be getting bigger and bigger all the time,” observed Pepperdine. “A couple of years ago you'd never think of needing a heap that was 64g, but today there are deployments where the heap has grown to 256g and tomorrow there are plans for heaps that are even larger. Dealing with all that data simply requires more horse power and some very specialized techniques. In some cases, teams are trying to push hardware to the breaking point. Under those conditions, you need to be very clever just to get things to work -- let alone to get them to be fast. We are very quickly moving from a world where everything happens in a transaction to one where if you were to even consider using a transaction, you've lost."

When asked about the greatest misconceptions about performance tuning that he currently encounters, he said, “If you have a performance problem, you should start looking at code at the very least and for that extra step, whip out an execution profiler. I'm not going to say that I never use execution profilers or look at code. What I will say is that execution profilers are effective for a small subset of performance problems and code is literally the last thing you should look at.

And what is the most exciting thing happening in the world of Java today? “Interesting question because so many people would say that nothing exciting is happening in Java. Some might be disappointed that a few features have slipped in terms of scheduling. But I'd disagree with the first group and I'm not so concerned about the slippage because I still see a lot of exciting things happening. First, lambda will finally be with us and with lambda will come better ways.”

For JavaOne, he is proctoring for Heinz Kabutz's lab. “I'm actually looking forward to that more than I am to my own talk,” he remarked. “Heinz will be the third non-Sun/Oracle employee to present a lab and the first since Oracle began hosting JavaOne. He's got a great message. He's spent a ton of time making sure things are going to work, and we've got a great team of proctors to help out. After that, getting my talk done, the Java Champion's panel session and then kicking back and just meeting up and talking to some Java heads."

Finally, what should Java developers know that they currently do not know? “’Write Once, Run Everywhere’ is a great slogan and Java has come closer to that dream than any other technology stack that I've used. That said, different hardware bits work differently and as hard as we try, the JVM can't hide all the differences. Plus, if we are to get good performance we need to work with our hardware and not against it. All this implies that Java developers need to know more about the hardware they are deploying to.”

Originally published on blogs.oracle.com/javaone.

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