Friday Dec 16, 2011

Main Our Most Popular Tech Articles of 2011

You can stop holding your breath now. We have determined the Top 20 (meaning: most popular) Tech Articles Published by OTN in 2011!

What conclusions can we draw from this list? Well, for one: Traditionally, we publish a "Top 10" list at the end of the calendar year. But in 2011, there were so many popular articles published that this ceiling was too limiting.

Other conclusions:

  • Java developers love reading articles. Total domination of the page view numbers this year.
  • Adam Bien is not only a Java Champion, but a Page Views Champion as well. Neither Brittany Spears nor George Clooney would have been more helpful to us in that department.
  • You all seem fairly curious about Java 7, Java EE, and JavaFX.
  • If you have your own observations, let's see them in comments.

 Without further delay, here's the list:

  1. Fork and Join: Java Can Excel at Painless Parallel Programming Too! (Julien Ponge)
  2. Taking Your First Steps with Oracle Solaris 11 (Brian Leonard & Glynn Foster)
  3. Contexts and Dependency Injection in Java EE 6 (Adam Bien)
  4. Unit Testing for Java EE (Adam Bien)
  5. Neural Networks on the NetBeans Platform (Zoran Sevarac)
  6. Oracle Senior VP Steve Harris on Oracle’s Vision of Java (Janice J. Heiss)
  7. Oracle Database 11g Express Edition Quick Tour (Przemyslaw Piotrowski)
  8. Looking Ahead to Java SE 7 and 8: A Discussion with Oracle’s Java Language Architect, Brian Goetz (Janice J. Heiss)
  9. Working with Java SE 7 Exception Changes (Manfred Riem)
  10. Client-Side Improvements in Java 6 and Java 7 (Josh Marinacci)
  11. How I Simplified Oracle Database Installation on Oracle Linux (Ginny Henningsen)
  12. The DBA’s Guide to Setting Up Oracle RAC One Node and Oracle Data Guard (Martin Bach)
  13. Integration Testing for Java EE (Adam Bien)
  14. Build a .NET Application on the Oracle Database with Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 (John Paul Cook)
  15. Templating with JSF 2.0 Facelets (Deepak Vohra)
  16. Using Adobe Flex and JavaFX with JavaServer Faces 2.0 (Re Lai)
  17. Series: Oracle Exadata Command Reference (Arup Nanda)
  18. Better Resource Management with Java SE 7: Beyond Syntactic Sugar (Julien Ponge)
  19. Using Transitions for Animation in Oracle's JavaFX 2.0 (James L. Weaver)
  20. Scaling a PHP MySQL Web Application, Part 1 (Eli White)

Want to see your name on this list for 2012? We're always looking for good writers. Looking forward to seeing your proposals!


Originally posted on blogs.oracle.com/otn  by Justin Kestelyn 

Photo: Preetam Rai

Wednesday Nov 30, 2011

The JavaServer Faces 2.2 viewAction Component

Life just got easier for users of JavaServer Faces. In a new article, now up on otn/java, titled “New JavaServer Faces 2.2 Feature: The viewAction Component,” Tom McGinn, Oracle’s Principal Curriculum Developer for Oracle Server Technologies, explores the advantages offered by the JavaServer Faces 2.2 view action feature, which, according to McGinn, “simplifies the process for performing conditional checks on initial and postback requests, enables control over which phase of the lifecycle an action is performed in, and enables both implicit and declarative navigation.”

As McGinn observes: “A view action operates like a button command (UICommand) component. By default, it is executed during the Invoke Application phase in response to an initial request. However, as you'll see, view actions can be invoked during any phase of the lifecycle and, optionally, during postback, making view actions well suited to performing preview checks.”

McGinn explains that the JavaServer Faces 2.2 view action feature offers several advantages over the previous method of performing evaluations before a page is rendered:

   * View actions can be triggered early on, before a full component tree is built, resulting in a lighter weight call.

   * View action timing can be controlled.

   * View actions can be used in the same context as the GET request.

   * View actions support both implicit and explicit navigation.

   * View actions support both non-faces (initial) and faces (postback) requests.

Read the complete article here.

Wednesday Nov 16, 2011

The Big Announcement, This Year, at Devoxx 2011!

Stephan Janssen started the developer conference with his traditional "Welcome and Announcements" and this year announced Devoxx France, the new and only Devoxx conference outside of Belgium. It will take place in Paris, April 18 to 20, 2012. The Paris Java user group is organizing the 3 day conference. The conference is designed after Devoxx with Tools in Action, Labs, BOFs and Quickies and with one university day and 2 conference days. The model works well since Stephan turns down attendees every year. The content will be 75% in French and 25% in English. Call for papers opened today. Oracle will be a sponsor at the event!

Monday Oct 17, 2011

Greg Bollella and Eric Jensen on the Future of Cyber-Physical Systems with Embedded Java and Berkeley DB

At JavaOne 2011, Greg Bollella, Chief Architect for Embedded Java and Eric Jensen, Oracle Principal Product Manager and a former embedded developer, gave a session (25143) titled “Telemetry and Synchronization with Embedded Java and Berkeley DB”. Bollella has been a leader in the Embedded Java and real-time Java space since Java was first applied there.

The presentation offered a vision of the potential future of Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS), defined as, “a system featuring a tight combination and coordination between the systems computational and physical elements,” that was so powerful that even if the expectations turn out to be exaggerated, CPS technological change will, in a decade or so, significantly alter our lives in pervasive and unforeseeable ways. Bollella went so far as to say that CPS applications have the potential to dwarf the 20th Century IT Revolution.

He drew a contrast between where CPS applications are in use today and where they will be in use tomorrow.

Today: High confidence medical devices and systems; assisted living; process control (metal smelting, chemical plants, refineries); traffic control and safety; advanced automotive systems; energy conservation; environmental control (electric power, water resources, and communications systems); distributed robotics (telepresence, telemedicine); defense systems; manufacturing; smart structures; home automation; building automation; transportation (rail, air, water, road); retail systems (point of sale and monitoring); entertainment industry; mining; industrial control (power generation).

Tomorrow:  Distributed micro-power generation; highly advanced autonomous driver assistance features; networked autonomous automobiles; networked building automation systems; cognitive radio (distributed consensus about bandwidth availability); large-scale RFID-based servicing systems which could acquire the nature of distributed real-time control systems; autonomous air traffic control; advanced industrial and home networked robotics; intelligent traffic control systems; intelligent autonomous power (gas/electricity); distribution systems; networked personal medical monitoring devices.

A lot to take in – the technology all around us growing in intelligence! In 2009, 3.9 billion embedded processors were shipped – the number is expected to double to roughly 8 billion by 2015. Some predict that by 2025 the number will be well into the trillions. And currently, an estimated five times more embedded software is written than all other software today. If the reality is anywhere close to the projections and estimates, we are in for an interesting ride on some intelligent transport.

Telemetry

Bollella went on to discuss telemetry, a term frequently used by NASA and defined as a technology that “allows remote measurement and reporting of information”. Central to telemetry is the idea that the information does not persist on the device after measurement. Uses of telemetry in the automotive realm include streaming operational data from the vehicle to the manufacturer’s IT system for analysis, services for vehicle operator, failure prediction, and feedback to design teams on wear and failure rates. For industrial automation, telemetry is used for failure prediction and to process monitoring and reporting

Synchronization

Bollella explained that his use of synchronization is idiosyncratic to database technology and involves two synchronized databases containing the same set of data and relationships. Any change in one database appears (after some indeterminate delay) in the other. The information on the device persists on the device as long as it does on the backend

The use cases for synchronization are widespread and include:

•    Healthcare: Telemedicine, Home health systems, Mobile health practitioners
•    Industrial: Manufacturing, Mining
•    Energy: Smart Grid, Energy Management
•    Entertainment: TVs, set top boxes, automotive rear-seat entertainment
•    Distribution/Shipping: Everything from local deliveries to transoceanic cargo shipments
•    Government: Border Control, Resource Management, Customs, Immigration, Land Management, Forest Service, etc
•    Law Enforcement/Military: Police officers and soldiers in the field, also aboard Naval vessels
•    Retail: Real time inventory linked to point-of-sale transactions
•    Distribution/Shipping: Everything from local deliveries to transoceanic cargo shipments

Bollella acknowledged that serious development challenges remain. The current state of CPS connectivity is poor, with the vast majority being standalone. Given the highly connected world of social networking, mobile devices, and the web, this might be surprising. But it is important to consider that these are two technological areas have evolved in environments with different demands. CPS is focused on real-time, predictability, safety, security, and fault tolerance; the Web is a different matter.

CPS requires real-time with predictable control loops -- there are no standard communication protocols or Ethernet or “IP-over” functionality on devices. There are harsh environments, especially in spacecrafts, that can affect wired Ethernet, and there exists incompatibility of data formats and communication protocols with IT standards.

Perhaps of greatest importance, there has been little perceived need for CPS connectivity with devices. But this is changing rapidly, and with it, obstacles are being overcome as one of the major trends in embedded is connectivity development. Bollella admitted that there were a lot of unknowns going into the future, but the challenges are not insurmountable.

Oracle’s Eric Jensen took over and gave some details about the Oracle Berkeley DB and the Oracle Database Mobile Server, which he characterized as the best way to synchronize mobile or embedded applications that utilize SQLite or Berkeley DB with an Oracle backend. The embedded Java platform, when coupled with Berkeley DB and Database Mobile Server, has the ability to manage networks of embedded devices using existing enterprise frameworks in a way that could prove to be quite revolutionary

It will be interesting to look back in 10 years and see how much Cyber-Physical Systems have, or have not, changed the world.

JCP.next, JSR 348 -- Towards a New Version of the Java Community Process

At JavaOne 2011, Tuesday's mid-day JCP discussion, presented by Heather VanCura, Oracle Manager, JCP Program, and Patrick Curran, Chair, Java Community Process, Oracle, explored some big news about the JCP. Oracle's commitment to greater transparency, participation, and openness is coming through loud and clear in JSR 348, "Towards a new version of the Java Community Process" -- otherwise known as JCP.next.

The main improvements, at this stage, involve gaining greater transparency by requiring, rather than suggesting, that all development is done on open mailing lists and issue trackers.  Furthermore, the recruiting process for Expert Group members will be publicly viewable, and ways to disclose TCK testing process results will be investigated - currently, the public is rarely aware of the results of the TCK testing process. All of these developments are designed to result in a more public, open, accessible and transparent JCP.

JSR 348 passed through a Pubic Review Ballot in mid-September with results for the SE/EE Executive Community showing 14 YES votes, one Abstain (Google) and one non-vote (VMWare). Oracle expects the initial version of JSR 348 to be concluded in October 2011, offering simple changes that will be quickly implemented. A subsequent second JSR, to be filed soon afterward, will tackle more complex issues, including any changes required to the Java Specification Participation Agreement (JSPA).

The JSPA is defined by the JCP as "a one-year, renewable agreement between you [[the participant in the agreement]] and Oracle America. It entitles you to review and comment on JSRs during the Community Review period - after they are initially approved by their sponsoring Expert Group and before they are open for Public Review. The agreement carries an annual fee, depending on your Member category."

The success of the Java community depends upon an open and transparent JCP, so JCP.next is worthy of our praise and attention.

The Road to Java EE 7: Is It All About the Cloud?

PanelWith considerable enthusiasm I attended “The Road to Java EE 7: Is It All About the Cloud?” (23423) session, a panel of EE experts, late Wednesday morning at JavaOne 2011. I always find Java EE developers and architects to be among the smartest people around. Last year’s Java EE panel session, covered on otn/java and titled, “Where We Are and Where We’re Going” was fraught with more uncertainty about the future of Java EE. This year, it’s clear: Java EE is heading towards the Cloud. The session this year was packed even in a much larger room than last, with roughly three times the number of attendees as last year.

The panel consisted of the following people:
--Adam Bien, Consultant, Author, Java EE Expert
--David Blevins, Apache Software Foundation
--Emmanuel Bernard, JBoss Platform Architect, Red Hat
--Reza Rahman, Senior Software Engineer/Community Outreach Activist, Caucho Technology
--Linda DeMichiel, Java EE 7 Specification Lead, Oracle

The panel, moderated by Oracle’s Alexis Moussine-Pouchkine, Java EE Developer Advocate, Oracle France, addressed many issues, including:
• The current state of Java EE 6 adoption
• The motivations for Java EE 7
• What the cloud really means for Java EE 7
• Modularity in Java EE.next
• Better streamlined component models
• Status of ongoing work in the JCP
* Services and resources provisioning.
* Virtualization intersection between virtualization and PaaS?
* Meta-data: are XML deployment descriptors good after all?

Look for a detailed blow-by-blow account of the discussion on otn/java in coming weeks.

Getting Started with Embedded Java -- Sense, Control, Connect, Store, Sync

At JavaOne 2011, Terrence Barr, Senior Technologist, Mobile & Embedded, Oracle Germany, presided over a two-hour HOL (Hands-On-Lab) on Monday in which he taught developers how to build an embedded Java solution that senses and controls the environment, stores data, and connects to back-end databases for synchronization and further processing. The session offered considerable detail along with step-by-step exercises as participants learned how to create the embedded EnviroTracker system and application which tracks and processes environmental data. The application interfaces with a microcontroller to read sensor input (ambient light brightness), to control output (and LED), and then further processes the sensor data.

The lab focused on:
• The benefits of Java technology in the embedded space
• The components of embedded Java platforms
• Setting up an embedded Java platform
• Interfacing between the embedded Java platform, the microcontroller, and I/O
• Accessing and controlling I/O from Java
• Processing sensor data

Barr took developers through seven basic tasks or exercises:

1. Create the EnviroTracker
2. Install the OJEC (Oracle Java ME Embedded Client) on the Development Host
The Oracle Java Micro Edition Embedded Client (OJEC) implements the CDC Platform configuration.
3. Develop and Test Your First Embedded Java Application..
4. Install OJEC on the Target Platform and Run Your Java Application
5: Understand I/O and the Arduino Microcontroller
6: EnviroTracker V1: First Contact
7: EnviroTracker V2: Continuous Monitoring and Processing

By the end of a rigorous and demanding, but satisfying two hours, attendees had built a real-world embedded system and created the EnviroTracker Application to track environmental sensor data. They learned how to install and use embedded Java runtimes and tools, and how to interface with I/O devices and microcontrollers from Java applications.

The take home message: Creating sophisticated embedded Java systems and applications is easy due to the platform independence of the Java language and runtime, the scalability of pre-existing Java skills to embedded development, and the comprehensive support provided by mature and feature-rich developer tools.

For more info, go to Terrence Barr's blog.

Tuesday Oct 11, 2011

JavaOne Latin America Call for Papers

JavaOne is the world’s premiere conference for Java technology visionaries, developers, and users. JavaOne Latin America will be 06-08 December in São Paulo, Brazil at the Transamerica Expo Center. Now is the time to submit proposals for innovative presentations that demonstrate your passion for using Java technology in real-world scenarios or leading-edge cases.

To ensure the best content for Java developers, the Java community is looking for interesting and relevant submissions on the following topics:
    •    Client Side Technologies and Rich User Experiences
    •    Core Java Platform
    •    Java EE Web Profile, Platform Technologies, Web Services, and the Cloud
    •    Java ME, Mobile, Embedded, and Devices

If your paper is selected, you’ll receive a complimentary pass to JavaOne Latin America. There, you can connect, communicate, and collaborate with the energetic community of Java developers.

Submissions should be:
    •    Java-related topics (not other technologies...unless it's specifically a topic about how they INTEGRATE with Java)
    •    Non-product pitches
    •    Interesting/innovative uses of Java
    •    Practical relevant case studies/examples/practices/etc.

The call for papers will close on Monday, October 17 at 11:59 pm local time. We look forward to hearing from you. Submit Paper

Not Submitting? You should still attend JavaOne Latin America! Register now!

Monday Oct 10, 2011

JavaOne 2011: It's a Wrap

Thanks for being a part of JavaOne 2011! Here are a few more things you can do to keep that Java buzz:

Provide Feedback
Take the conference survey and session surveys.


Register for Next Year

We know JavaOne 2012 will be bigger and better (you did fill out the feedback survey, right?). Register between now and October 21 for JavaOne 2012 and save $800—that's 40%!


Get Session Content Two Ways

1) Download presentation .pdfs from Content Catalog.
The slides for a large number of the sessions at JavaOne are available without charge at You'll need to do a search in order for the sessions to show up -- just clicking the Search button will do the trick too.  The slides can be downloaded by clicking on the PDF icon. Many thanks to the JavaOne staff for making these available for everyone now and removing the paywall that was there last year. :-)

2) Videos on Parleys
There are also about 20 or so presentations that have recorded audio as well as slides from the conference available on Parleys.com. Approximately 160 presentations (40%) were recorded and three presentations per week will get released with a first batch of 20. The JavaOne 2011 channel on Parleys.com has already received 2790 views and 320 downloads!

Watch Videos
JavaOne Keynotes on Demand
Oracle Technology Network interviews with Java community members (click on JavaOne OnSite Interviews)
New videos all the time YouTube.com/java

Go Global

JavaOne comes to Latin America December 6-8, 2011 (Call For Papers closes next week!), and Japan April 4-6, 2012.


Stay Connected
Twitter/@java (all things Java), Twitter/@javaoneconf  (JavaOne specific)
Facebook/IloveJava (all things Java), Facebook/JavaOne (JavaOne specific)
Blogs.oracle.com/Java (all things Java), Blogs.oracle.com/JavaOne (JavaOne specific)
Find a Java User Group (JUG) near you!

Wednesday Aug 31, 2011

Moving Java Forward: Java Summer Workshop 2011

When students tell you, “I could hardly believe I was programming my own game, animations and videos using Java,” or “It is a great opportunity to find out the fun of programming and creating your own animation or whatever you want to create,” and one parent adds “after the workshop, my son is so familiar with Oracle and Java,” I just can tell you it was a great event!

Over 300 Oracle employee sons and daughters, Oracle employees, parents and local high school students and teachers attended the three-day Java Summer Workshop and volunteer training on Greenfoot and Alice (Aug. 8-12 at Oracle HQ). (Alice and Greenfoot are two award winning visual educational software tools to teach Java programming.) The workshop was an introduction to programming only using drag and drop functions for 11 to 18 year old students.

Now available online are the training for Alice and Greenfoot, video student interviews, presentations, additional resources to learn Java, quotes, projects and pictures. Check it out!

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