Tuesday Apr 26, 2016

2016 JavaOne Registration Now Open

The JavaOne conference brings together Java experts and enthusiasts for an exceptional week of learning and networking focused entirely on all things Java. With hundreds of sessions, you will learn from the most innovative and diverse Java content. You can't afford to miss it!

September 18 - 22, 2016, San Francisco. Register now!

With a full conference pass, you get:
 • Access to more than 500 JavaOne sessions, Birds-of-a-Feather (BOF) sessions and JavaOne Hands-on Labs (HOLs)
 • Keynote sessions for JavaOne and Oracle OpenWorld
 • Java User Group Forum
 • Exhibition Halls at JavaOne
 • Access to the Java Hub 
 • Oracle Appreciation Event

Important ways to save:
 • The call for proposals is open until May 9. If your session is accepted, you will receive a full pass
 • You will save $600 with the Super Saver rate, if you register before May 1
 • Employees of a national/federal, state, provincial, or local government entity, including public higher education institutions can benefit from government rate.

Tuesday Mar 29, 2016

Moving to Garbage First

Garbage First (G1) is likely to become the default collector in Java 9. In this presentation, Kirk Pepperdine shows different case studies on how to use the G1 with your applications. He also demonstrates tips and tricks to work around some of the hiccups. 


In this interview, Kirk Pepperdine shows his Censum performance diagnostics tool from jClarity and describes the state of G1 GC 


Waste Management in JDK 9

“Instead of a simple garbage collector to free up memory, Garbage First (G1) takes the role of a waste management consultant: freeing unused memory and identifying ways to reduce the overall amount of garbage.” explains Eric Costlow in a new blog

Costlow demonstrates how string Deduplication can significantly decrease heap usage. Using the Eclipse IDE, he runs a performance test using Java Flight Recorder to benchmark the results.

Monday Mar 28, 2016

Module System in JDK 9

From original blog post by Mark Reinhold 

The module system (JSR 376 and JEP 261), was integrated into JDK 9 last week and is now available for testing in early-access build 111.

Project Jigsaw is an enormous effort, encompassing six JEPs implemented by dozens of engineers over many years. So far we’ve defined a modular structure for the JDK (JEP 200), reorganized the source code according to that structure (JEP 201), and restructured the JDK and JRE run-time images to support modules (JEP 220).

Like the previous major change, the introduction of modular run-time images, the introduction of the module system might impact you even if you don’t make direct use of it. That’s because the module system is now fully operative at both compile time and run time, at least for the modules comprising the JDK itself. Most of the JDK’s internal APIs are, as a consequence, fully encapsulated and hence, by default, inaccessible to code outside of the JDK.

An existing application that uses only standard Java SE APIs and runs on JDK 8 should just work, as they say, on JDK 9. If, however, your application uses a JDK-internal API, or uses a library or framework that does so, then it’s likely to fail. In many cases you can work around this via the -XaddExports option of the javac and java commands. If, e.g., your application uses the internal sun.security.x509.X500Name class then you can enable access to it via the option

-XaddExports:java.base/sun.security.x509=ALL-UNNAMED 

This causes all members of the sun.security.x509 package in the java.base module to be exported to the special unnamed module in which classes from the class path are defined.

Read more

Wednesday Mar 09, 2016

The State of the Module System

Original Post from Java Architect Mark Reinhold about the Jigsaw Project

This is an informal overview of enhancements to the Java SE Platform prototyped in Project Jigsaw and proposed for JSR 376: The Java Platform Module System. A related document describes enhancements to JDK-specific tools and APIs, which are outside the scope of the JSR.

As described in the JSR, the specific goals of the module system are to provide
• Reliable configuration, to replace the brittle, error-prone class-path mechanism with a means for program components to declare explicit dependences upon one another, along with

• Strong encapsulation, to allow a component to declare which of its public types are accessible to other components, and which are not.

These features will benefit application developers, library developers, and implementors of the Java SE Platform itself directly and, also, indirectly, since they will enable a scalable platform, greater platform integrity, and improved performance.

Contents: 
1 Defining Modules 
2 Using Modules 
3 Compatibility & Migration 
4 Services 
5 Advanced Topics 

Read the full post 

Tuesday Jul 28, 2015

JShell and REPL in Java 9

Java 9 introduces JShell and a Read-Eval-Print Loop (REPL) for the Java Programming Language.  REPL  allows you to evaluate code snippets such as declarations, statements, expressions. You can test your code as you create it, and way before you are done with your whole project. 

The JShell Java Enhancement Proposal (JEP) for the project indicated that the new feature is the result of academic feedback. Schools are adopting languages that have REPL functionality because it lowers the initial learning curve of programming. The interactive REPL tool gives rapid evaluation of code to young developers. 

In the video below, Jim Connors gives a short demonstration on how you can now use the tool as part of the latest Java 9 build. 

Learn more about the Java 9 release and how you can test it by visiting JDK 9 Outreach program

Tuesday Jul 07, 2015

Start Testing with Java 9

Learn about some of the changes in the upcoming Java 9 release, expected in Fall 2016. The release is currently in an early stage and a list of features compiled from the list of JEPs is available online. This is a starting point for testing whether Java 9 will affect your code. Make sure to check the list of added, changed, removed functionalities. There are suggestions about how to best test your code against Java 9.


Check out how you can be more involved and participate in Adopt OpenJDK. This community program will get you started whether you want to attend an OpenJDK testing workshop, run your own event, just learn more about the technology or provide feedback. Visit Adopt OpenJDK.


Monday Mar 02, 2015

New Java Champion: Sven Reimers

Congratulations to the new Java Champion Sven Reimers!

Sven is based near Lake Constance in Germany, and works as a systems engineer at Airbus Defence and Space. He has more than 15 years of experience building complex software systems, and more than 14 years experience with Java. In 2009, Sven was the winner of the Duke's Choice Award in the Network Solutions category for ND SatCom Satellite Communication Management Software.

Besides his day job, his contributions to NetBeans got him elected to the NetBeans Dream Team in 2008. He is a community leader for NetBeans, a founder of the Java User Group in Bodensee and a contributor to OpenJFX. Sven has been very active as a public speaker at multiple conferences, events, JUGs all over the world. e.g. JavaOne (SF/Brasil), SvJUG, JayDay, NetBeans Days, JFokus, and JCrete.

He is an active contributor and participant at the Hackergarten events. In the interview below, Heather VanCura interviews Sven and Andres Almiray at Devoxx 2014 

Java Champions are an exclusive group of passionate Java technology and community leaders who are community-nominated and selected under a project sponsored by Oracle. Learn more about Java Champions.

Friday Apr 12, 2013

OpenJDK Governing Board Elects At-Large Members

The OpenJDK Governing Board, which oversees the structure and operation of the OpenJDK Community, has elected two At-Large Members: Andrew Haley and Doug Lea. Both were previously serving as at At-Large members and began new one-year terms on April 1.

Andrew Haley, of Red Hat, wrote in his candidate statement that his goal is to “stand up for freedom and steer the governing board toward helping people who crank out code to get their job done.”

Lea, of SUNY Oswego, wrote that he hoped “to continue my role as an advocate for continuing improvements in OpenJDK processes and mechanisms, especially as they impact the academic, research, and individual contributor communities.”

The OpenJDK Governing Board oversees the structure and operation of the OpenJDK Community. It has two At-Large Members who serve for a term of one calendar year, nominally starting on the first day of April each year.

Thursday Mar 07, 2013

OpenJDK Test Fest and Devoxx UK

The London Java user group is organizing the first Test Fest on March 23rd in London with the collaboration of Oracle and IBM. "Contributors to OpenJDK need to be confident that their changes are sound and do not cause problems elsewhere." explains event host Martijn Verburg. Many test cases are already available but each application has different characteristics, environment and other attributes. The goal is to provide a larger and more comprehensive series of tests for Open JDK. 

If you cannot attend this event, the organizers and some of the guest presenters from Oracle and IBM - among them Oracle engineer Stuart Marks - will be at Devoxx UK starting Monday evening until Thursday (from March 25th until the 27th). Stuart Marks will present a Bird-of-a-Feather (BoF) session about "the testing of OpenJDK" on Tuesday, March 26th at 8:00pm and Martijn Verburg will talk about OpenJDK Hack Session Tuesday evening at 8:00pm and 9:00pm. Don't forget to register for Devoxx UK!

Additional online resources: Collaborate with the OpenJDK Quality team Online information FAQ


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