Wednesday May 22, 2013

What's New in JMS 2.0: Ease of Use

A new article by Oracle’s Nigel Deakin, up on otn/java, titled “What's New in JMS 2.0, Part One: Ease of Use,” demonstrates ways in which JMS 2.0 enables developers to send and receive messages while writing less code. Some features of JMS 2.0, part of Java EE 7, and can be deployed in Java EE Web or EJB applications, while others can only be used standalone in a Java SE environment.

Deakin writes:

“The single biggest change in JMS 2.0 is the introduction of a new API for sending and receiving messages that reduces the amount of code a developer must write. For applications that run in a Java EE application server, the new API also supports resource injection. This allows the application server to take care of the creation and management of JMS objects, simplifying the application even further…”

The new API, known as the “simplified” API, is simpler and easier to use than the existing JMS 1.1 API, now known as the “classic” API.

Deakin describes the new API as follows:

“The simplified API consists of three new interfaces: JMSContext, JMSProducer, and JMSConsumer:

* JMSContext replaces the separate Connection and  Session objects in the classic API with a single object.

* JMSProducer is a lightweight replacement for the MessageProducer object in the classic API. It allows message delivery options, headers, and properties to be configured using method chaining (sometimes known as a builder pattern).

* JMSConsumer replaces the MessageConsumer object in the classic API and is used in a similar way.”

Developers can now choose between the two APIs and have access to both the classic and new features. Stay tuned for Part Two, in which Deakin will explore new messaging features in JMS 2.0.

Check out Part One here.

Wednesday Mar 06, 2013

Get started with Java!

Every year, the Java platform is growing with new features for enterprise, web, embedded and mobile application and developers. To help beginners navigate the platform and get started with Java technologies, new learning resources are available on the New to Java website. Developers will write a "Hello World" application, test their Java knowledge,  create user interfaces with JavaFX, and build enterprise applications with Java EE, desktop applications with Java SE or applications for mobile and embedded devices.  

Being up to date about current trends and networking with other developers are also critical for a career in programming. Developers can connect with top leaders in the community at conferences and community networks such as local user groups. They have the chance to contribute to open-source projects such as OpenJDK and Adopt-a-JSR to name just two.

Finally, parents and educators teaching programming to children will find software tools for young developers. They are free downloadable development tools with easy to use interfaces for young students. And Minecraft is so popular! Java technologist Daniel Green walks us through Minecraft mods with Java.

Monday Feb 27, 2012

New Java Curriculum

Today, Oracle Academy announced new Java curriculum for secondary schools, colleges and universities supporting hundreds of thousands of students. The training will include:

  • Java Fundamentals and Java Programming courses, designed especially for secondary schools and 2-year colleges
  • A comprehensive portfolio of Java courses for four-year colleges and universities
  • Training that supports teachers/faculty to deliver the Oracle Academy’s Java curriculum
  • Java competitions that help students develop and showcase their technology skills.
More on the announcement.

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Insider News from the Java Team at Oracle!

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