Monday Sep 22, 2014

Join NetBeans Community at JavaOne

Geertjan Wielenga is a NetBeans product manager working at Oracle, focused on Java and HTML5 development with NetBeans IDE and the NetBeans Platform. He is a Java technology enthusiast primarily interested in Java desktop technologies—in particular, application development on the NetBeans Platform. Wielenga tweets at @NetBeans and @geertjanw and blogs at https://blogs.oracle.com/geertjan/ 

Q: Tell us about NetBeans Community Day

Wielenga: NetBeans Community Day features the NetBeans community from around the world. Thirty speakers will share their expertise in six panels on popular NetBeans topics. The first theme is about the NetBeans partner activities. On the panel, Anton Arhipov from ZeroTurnaround, Ruslan Synytsky from Jelastic, and Matthew Tahvonen from Vaadim will present their new NetBeans plugins. Bruce Shimel from Boeing will explain the use of NetBeans in their open source community. 

[Read More]

Friday Sep 19, 2014

Robots, NetBeans IDE, and Raspberry Pi with James Gosling

James Gosling is now chief software architect of the Wave Glider, the flagship product at Liquid Robotics. The Wave Glider is a self-propelled, autonomous marine robot that collects and transmits ocean data. The Wave Glider will be on display exclusively at the Java Hub in the JavaOne exhibit hall during the entire conference. 

Since Gosling started at Liquid Robotics, he has re-architected the onboard software and refined a data-as-a-service cloud to provide direct, real-time access to ocean information. Java, which he invented, has played an increasing role in ocean data transmission and analysis.  

“Being able to debug and profile robots out at sea is a truly life-altering experience,” Gosling explains. He uses a set of tools—consisting of editors, debuggers, and profilers—that are part of the NetBeans IDE. At the JavaOne 2014 NetBeans Community Day, he will present the session “James Gosling, Robots, the Raspberry Pi, and Small Devices” [UGF8907] on Sunday, September 28. He will also present “Debugging and Profiling Robots with James Gosling” [CON6699] on Wednesday, October 1. Geertjan Wielenga, Mark Heckler, José Pereda, Johannes Weigend, Shai Almog and Jens Deters will join him to discuss those two topics. 

Join him as he closes out the JavaOne Community keynote with a fun, historical perspective of the genesis of Java, and a T-shirt toss! The Community Keynote will be held in the Marriott Marquis, Salon 7/8/9, on Thursday, October 2, 2014

Thursday Jul 31, 2014

User Groups at JavaOne

User group leaders from around the world meet once a year at JavaOne. Each year, they organize the Forum meeting the Sunday before JavaOne. Speakers and topics are vetted by community. Anyone attending JavaOne whether they belong to a user group or not are invited to those sessions. Make sure you arrive on time for the Forum on Sunday. It starts at 8:00am at Moscone West. Among the topics this year are NetBeans community and tools, Java EE and Glassfish update, lightning talks about productivity, Java tools for Maven and Java EE, free Java tools and how to teach Java. And you don't want to miss James Gosling. He will present his latest work on the Raspberry Pi, Robots and Small Devices. If you have not registered already.

Register by tomorrow Friday August 1, 2014 and take advantage of the Early Bird rate. It is a US $400 saving on registration!  

Friday Jul 18, 2014

Tech Article: Build with NetBeans IDE, Deploy to Oracle Java Cloud Service

If you've decided PaaS is is what your application needs, see how you can swiftly build and deploy applications to Oracle Java Cloud Service using NetBeans IDE. In "Build with NetBeans IDE, Deploy to Oracle Java Cloud Service," Oracle ACE Harshad Oak shows you how to set up Oracle Java Cloud Service, then install and use the Oracle Cloud Plugin in the NetBeans IDE.


Oak explains "Considering the rapid adoption of cloud-based services, it will only be a matter of time before we will all be building software using IDEs that integrate with multiple cloud services for various stages in the software development process." Read "Build with NetBeans IDE, Deploy to Oracle Java Cloud Service," and put your applications in the cloud. 

Tuesday May 13, 2014

Technical Article: Build a Rich Client Platform To-Do Application in NetBeans IDE

Check out the technical article "Build a Rich Client Platform To-Do Application in NetBeans IDE" on OTN. This article shows how to use NetBeans IDE 7.4 to develop a Swing-based "to-do" application, and it demonstrates the use of a rich client platform (RCP). 

The example application builds a to-do list, which is commonly found as part of privileged identity management (PIM) suites. The article doesn't just demo the NetBeans IDE's RCP features; it also sticks to object-oriented best practices, showing that you can develop GUI applications quickly and interactively without compromising long-term maintenance and a sound architecture.

Along the way, you'll take the NetBeans IDE visual editor through its paces. Also, you can learn many features that NetBeans IDE provides to increase developer productivity. 

Author Ioannis (John) Kostaras is a software architect and has been a Java developer since JDK 1.0. Kostaras has developed a number of standalone and web applications focusing on flexible object-oriented design and security. One such RCP application, written in NetBeans, was awarded the 2012 Duke's Choice Community Choice Award. (Kostaras reminded us that he is co-organizing "the hottest Java conference on earth," JCrete.) This technical article is an update of "A Complete App Using NetBeans 5" by Fernando Lozano, which was originally published in NetBeans Magazine.

Read "Build a Rich Client Platform To-Do Application in NetBeans IDE" now.

Monday Mar 24, 2014

The Future of Application Development Tools at Oracle

Last week we met with Chris Tonas, Vice President of Mobility and Application Development Tools at Oracle, to hear his take on the latest in the world of Java tooling and development frameworks. 

Q: Can you tell us a little bit about your role at Oracle as it relates to development tools? 

A: I lead the organization that is working on Oracle’s software development tools and frameworks, specifically, the teams that build our offerings for Java developers - whether in NetBeans, Eclipse or JDeveloper. Our team also builds the tools and frameworks that are used by developers working with Oracle’s cloud and mobile platforms.

Q: This week saw the release of JDK8 and NetBeans 8 along with it. How do you view this release? 

A: The release of JDK 8 and NetBeans 8 this week represents a big step forward for both Oracle and the Java Community. A lot of hard work and collaboration went into this milestone and I’d like to take a moment to thank everyone who contributed to this achievement. 

Q: With the new NetBeans 8.0 out, what are the plans for NetBeans going forward? 

A: In the short term, an update release of NetBeans 8 is underway to align with Java ME 8. Additional NetBeans 8 releases that target specific bugs are anticipated to be released after that. Longer term, Oracle is committed to the continued success of both Java and NetBeans. Work on JDK 9 is now underway and we’re planning a NetBeans 9 release to go along with it, as usual. 

Q: As you mentioned Oracle supports more than just the NetBeans IDE. What’s the thinking behind that? 

A: Oracle recognizes that developer tools aren’t a one-size-fits-all proposition. Oracle is a significant contributor to the Eclipse project and we are continuing to extend the capabilities of our Eclipse-based solutions as well. We offer JDeveloper for those who want the tightest alignment with the Oracle Fusion Middleware stack. In addition, we recognize that many JavaScript developers want to use light weight tools, and we are planning to address those needs as well.

Q: What are some of the key trends you see in the software development space right now? 

A: It’s clear that several significant trends are shaping software development and tools. Oracle is at the forefront of these changes and a leader in almost every aspect. We see three main changes happening right now:
  • Java remains the industry standard for server-side development, but we see growing demand to support developers using the combination of JavaScript and HTML5 for the presentation layer. We see JavaScript starting to gain ground for some server side use cases as well.
  • The shift to cloud-based deployment is now mainstream. Development for the cloud presents a new set of challenges and demands a fresh approach.
  • The third shift is the move to mobile. Mobile development must be integrated across the enterprise from the design phase throughout the lifecycle.

As the providers of tools for developers, these changes require an evolution of the tooling and infrastructure used to design and develop applications. 

Q:  So what is Oracle doing to address these developments? 

A: Some of the work has already happened. For example, NetBeans has supported the Java and JavaScript combination for a few releases now. Looking forward, Oracle has several new and innovative browser-based, cloud-centric and mobile initiatives underway that we will be sharing with the community over the next several months.

We are leveraging skills and technology from across our current developer tools organization to develop these new capabilities. We see the new generation of developer tools as complimentary to the tools that developers use and love today. The first of these initiatives that you’ll be able to use will be the forthcoming Oracle Developer Cloud Service – bringing your ALM and team collaboration work to the cloud. You can read more about it at http://cloud.oracle.com/developer 

Q: Where can developers learn more about these new tools? 

A: Just like every year, Oracle’s full vision for the future of software development will be shared at JavaOne and Oracle OpenWorld later this year. Our team is looking forward to sharing what we are working on with the development community.

Q: Thank you for your time, Chris. 

A: You're welcome.

Friday Sep 13, 2013

NetBeans Community Day at JavaOne

Join the NetBeans team at NetBeans Community Day at JavaOne 2013 to celebrate 15 Years of NetBeans!

An all-star lineup of Java experts will be on hand to help you get the most out of the NetBeans IDE, including Adam Bien, Kirk Pepperdine, Markus Eisele, John Yeary, Glenn Homer, Jiri Kovalsky, Zoran Sevarac, John Ceccarelli, Toni Epple, Gerrit Grunwald, Sven Reimers and more.  Learn learn tips and tricks for both Java EE and JavaFX development. Learn to how to profile your apps with the NetBeans Profiler. Learn about the plugins being developed for NetBeans by other companies. Influence the next round of features for NetBeans! 

There'll be NetBeans anniversary gifts for attendees! Add your name to the NetBeans Community Day Guest List.

Date: Sunday, September 22
Location: Moscone West, Hall 3024

NetBeans Community Day is free to registered JavaOne conference attendees.

Friday Sep 06, 2013

Java Champion/Rock Star Adam Bien at JavaOne 2013

Java Champions are developers who have made important contributions to the Java community; JavaOne Rock Stars are developers who have given highly rated sessions at JavaOne. Adam Bien is both – and one of the most distinguished Java developers in the community. He is an Expert Group member for the Java EE 6/7, EJB 3.X, JAX-RS and JPA 2.X JSRs and is an architect and developer for Java SE and Java EE projects. He has edited several books about JavaFX, J2EE, and Java EE, and is the author of Real World Java EE Patterns—Rethinking Best Practices, and Real World Java EE Night Hacks.

Bien is a Top Java Ambassador 2012, and JavaOne 2009, 2011, 2012 Rock Star. If all this were not enough, he was, in 2010, named Oracle Magazine’s Java Developer of the Year.

His 2013 sessions include:

CON2196: “Lean and Opinionated Java EE 7 Applications”
CON2229: “Architecting Enterprise JavaFX 8 Applications”
CON2230:  “Unit Tests Don’t Break: Stress-Testing Java EE Applications”
CON2231: “Demystifying Java EE”
UGF10369: “Cool NetBeans Tips and Tricks for Java EE 7 Development”

Q: Tell us about your JavaOne sessions.

Bien: In “Cool NetBeans Tips and Tricks for Java EE 7 Development,” I will introduce my favorite NetBeans features. I think I may surprise some attendees with NetBean's productivity and effectiveness.

In “Architecting Enterprise JavaFX 8 Applications,” I would like to introduce a Model View Presenter Architecture with Dependency Injection based on a "framework," only containing two classes. I would also like to highlight the interaction with SceneBuilder, the JavaFX WYSIWYG editor, without being too heavily dependent on it.

In the session "Demystifying Java EE," I will discuss some recurring misconceptions about the concepts and inner workings of Java EE. There is no magic in Java EE – Java EE 7 is very effective, if you follow some rules.

In “Lean and Opinionated Java EE 7 Applications,” I will introduce opinionated approaches and best practices for the design and implementation of Java EE 7 applications. I'm probably going to shock some architects, but the developers should like this session.

In “Unit Tests Don’t Break: Stress-Testing Java EE Applications,” I plan to stress test a Java EE 7 application and monitor the results in real time. Stress testing is incredibly important and sometimes not even a part of the development cycle.

Q: In addition to your sessions, what do you have planned for JavaOne?

Bien: JavaOne is one of the few conferences where I attend other sessions -- from dawn to dusk. In recent years there was not always time to pick lunch. At NetBeans/GlassFish days before JavaOne I will probably meet some Java friends, while at the actual JavaOne I’ve never managed to do that. The technical content is too good and there is not enough time between the sessions.

Q: Tell us about what’s happening with Enterprise JavaFX 8 apps.

Bien: In the recent edition of airhacks.com I started with HTML 5, but most of the attendees waited for Java FX 8 news. There are a lot of Swing applications out there. Migration from Swing to JavaFX is one of the FAQs. Also JavaFX is "just" Java. You can develop now from the User Interface to the back end using the same language, tools, and environments. You can use the same debugger, profiler or memory analyzer for all of your application tiers and layers. JavaFX suits perfectly enterprise application needs.

Q: What have you been working on lately?

Bien: I’ve helped my customers implement Java EE 7 and JavaFX applications. Also, I ported lightfish.adam-bien.com to Java EE 7 and GlassFish v4 and was even able to simplify the code. I also ported Apache FTP Mina to JavaEE7: http://e2ftp.adam-bien.com

Q: What are your expectations for Java EE 7? For Java SE 8?

Bien: I was already very happy with Java EE 6, so Java EE 7 can only exceed my expectations. I'm using daily builds of JavaFX coming with JDK 1.8 for my "leisure" activities. Here I would expect more stability and even better performance. 

Q: How do you assess the state of Java today?

Bien: Java is more interesting for building apps, than ever. And the interest is huge. This year there is an increased tendency to sell out workshops, sessions and conferences. Java 8 together with Java EE 7 and JavaFX 8 will make it even more interesting.

Java has only one problem: its age. We tend to forget how performant, scalable, ubiquitous, and "cutting edge" the Java ecosystem actually is.

Q: What should Java developers understand about unit testing?

Bien: Don't overdo it. Statistics do not matter. Test complex stuff first -- and there is no difference between writing tests for Java SE and Java EE applications

Q: Tell us about ways NetBeans can be used for Java EE 7 development?

A: With NetBeans I'm still able to surprise seasoned developers with productivity without any magic. As a contractor/freelancer I really don't like to spend any time with IDE maintenance and setup. With NetBeans I'm able to set up my full Java EE environment in about a minute on Linux, Windows or Mac. Without any plugins, configurations or restarts. For that reason, I'm using NetBeans daily builds without any friction. What I like the most: NetBeans supports me with integrated code completion, JavaDoc, hints and occasional helpers on demand (like, e.g., creation of beans.xml or persistence.xml) without excessive code generation or opaque wizards. You can achieve 80% with two shortcuts: ctrl + space and alt + enter.

Adam Bien’s Blog

Tuesday Jul 02, 2013

Belgrade Open Source Software Development Center

A new Open Source Software Development Center is open at University of Belgrade Serbia. It centers around using Java & NetBeans as open source projects to learn from and contribute to. Assistant Professor Zoran Sevarac says that not only does the center allow him to teach software development using open source projects, but also "we are improving our University courses based on the experience we get from working on open source code." 

Some of the projects underway are a NetBeans UML plugin; Neuroph (a Java neural network framework, with a NetBeans Platform-based UI); a NetBeans DOAP Plugin; WorkieTalkie (NetBeans chat plugin); and 2D and 3D visualization plugins for NetBeans. Here's video describing the NetBeans UML plugin:

University of Belgrade also has an official university course about open source development, where students learn to use development tools, work in teams, participate in open source projects and learn from real world software development projects.

Students, teachers, and researchers at the University of Belgrade, and any member of the open source community are welcome to come to learn software development from successful open source projects. For more information, you can contact Zoran Sevarac (@neuroph on Twitter). 

Thursday Jun 20, 2013

Submit your Nominations for 2013 Duke's Choice Awards

The 2013 Duke's Choice Award program is now accepting nominations through July 22nd. The Duke's Choice Awards celebrate innovation in the world of Java technology, and are granted to individuals, organizations and businesses for their compelling use of Java technology. Anyone can now submit a nomination online.

Innovators in Java have received the Duke's Choice Awards for over 10 years. Last year's Duke's Choice Awards winners are featured on Java.net/dukeschoice.

Winners will be announced at JavaOne 2013 in San Francisco. In addition to the Duke Choice Award statue, each winner will receive a full JavaOne SF conference pass and recognition in Java Magazine, The Java Source Blog, and Oracle's Java Developer Newsletter.

Even if you are not submitting this year, help us spread the word by hosting the banner on your website or blog.

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