Monday Mar 24, 2014

The Future of Application Development Tools at Oracle

Last week we met with Chris Tonas, Vice President of Mobility and Application Development Tools at Oracle, to hear his take on the latest in the world of Java tooling and development frameworks. 

Q: Can you tell us a little bit about your role at Oracle as it relates to development tools? 

A: I lead the organization that is working on Oracle’s software development tools and frameworks, specifically, the teams that build our offerings for Java developers - whether in NetBeans, Eclipse or JDeveloper. Our team also builds the tools and frameworks that are used by developers working with Oracle’s cloud and mobile platforms.

Q: This week saw the release of JDK8 and NetBeans 8 along with it. How do you view this release? 

A: The release of JDK 8 and NetBeans 8 this week represents a big step forward for both Oracle and the Java Community. A lot of hard work and collaboration went into this milestone and I’d like to take a moment to thank everyone who contributed to this achievement. 

Q: With the new NetBeans 8.0 out, what are the plans for NetBeans going forward? 

A: In the short term, an update release of NetBeans 8 is underway to align with Java ME 8. Additional NetBeans 8 releases that target specific bugs are anticipated to be released after that. Longer term, Oracle is committed to the continued success of both Java and NetBeans. Work on JDK 9 is now underway and we’re planning a NetBeans 9 release to go along with it, as usual. 

Q: As you mentioned Oracle supports more than just the NetBeans IDE. What’s the thinking behind that? 

A: Oracle recognizes that developer tools aren’t a one-size-fits-all proposition. Oracle is a significant contributor to the Eclipse project and we are continuing to extend the capabilities of our Eclipse-based solutions as well. We offer JDeveloper for those who want the tightest alignment with the Oracle Fusion Middleware stack. In addition, we recognize that many JavaScript developers want to use light weight tools, and we are planning to address those needs as well.

Q: What are some of the key trends you see in the software development space right now? 

A: It’s clear that several significant trends are shaping software development and tools. Oracle is at the forefront of these changes and a leader in almost every aspect. We see three main changes happening right now:
  • Java remains the industry standard for server-side development, but we see growing demand to support developers using the combination of JavaScript and HTML5 for the presentation layer. We see JavaScript starting to gain ground for some server side use cases as well.
  • The shift to cloud-based deployment is now mainstream. Development for the cloud presents a new set of challenges and demands a fresh approach.
  • The third shift is the move to mobile. Mobile development must be integrated across the enterprise from the design phase throughout the lifecycle.

As the providers of tools for developers, these changes require an evolution of the tooling and infrastructure used to design and develop applications. 

Q:  So what is Oracle doing to address these developments? 

A: Some of the work has already happened. For example, NetBeans has supported the Java and JavaScript combination for a few releases now. Looking forward, Oracle has several new and innovative browser-based, cloud-centric and mobile initiatives underway that we will be sharing with the community over the next several months.

We are leveraging skills and technology from across our current developer tools organization to develop these new capabilities. We see the new generation of developer tools as complimentary to the tools that developers use and love today. The first of these initiatives that you’ll be able to use will be the forthcoming Oracle Developer Cloud Service – bringing your ALM and team collaboration work to the cloud. You can read more about it at http://cloud.oracle.com/developer 

Q: Where can developers learn more about these new tools? 

A: Just like every year, Oracle’s full vision for the future of software development will be shared at JavaOne and Oracle OpenWorld later this year. Our team is looking forward to sharing what we are working on with the development community.

Q: Thank you for your time, Chris. 

A: You're welcome.

Friday Sep 13, 2013

NetBeans Community Day at JavaOne

Join the NetBeans team at NetBeans Community Day at JavaOne 2013 to celebrate 15 Years of NetBeans!

An all-star lineup of Java experts will be on hand to help you get the most out of the NetBeans IDE, including Adam Bien, Kirk Pepperdine, Markus Eisele, John Yeary, Glenn Homer, Jiri Kovalsky, Zoran Sevarac, John Ceccarelli, Toni Epple, Gerrit Grunwald, Sven Reimers and more.  Learn learn tips and tricks for both Java EE and JavaFX development. Learn to how to profile your apps with the NetBeans Profiler. Learn about the plugins being developed for NetBeans by other companies. Influence the next round of features for NetBeans! 

There'll be NetBeans anniversary gifts for attendees! Add your name to the NetBeans Community Day Guest List.

Date: Sunday, September 22
Location: Moscone West, Hall 3024

NetBeans Community Day is free to registered JavaOne conference attendees.

Friday Sep 06, 2013

Java Champion/Rock Star Adam Bien at JavaOne 2013

Java Champions are developers who have made important contributions to the Java community; JavaOne Rock Stars are developers who have given highly rated sessions at JavaOne. Adam Bien is both – and one of the most distinguished Java developers in the community. He is an Expert Group member for the Java EE 6/7, EJB 3.X, JAX-RS and JPA 2.X JSRs and is an architect and developer for Java SE and Java EE projects. He has edited several books about JavaFX, J2EE, and Java EE, and is the author of Real World Java EE Patterns—Rethinking Best Practices, and Real World Java EE Night Hacks.

Bien is a Top Java Ambassador 2012, and JavaOne 2009, 2011, 2012 Rock Star. If all this were not enough, he was, in 2010, named Oracle Magazine’s Java Developer of the Year.

His 2013 sessions include:

CON2196: “Lean and Opinionated Java EE 7 Applications”
CON2229: “Architecting Enterprise JavaFX 8 Applications”
CON2230:  “Unit Tests Don’t Break: Stress-Testing Java EE Applications”
CON2231: “Demystifying Java EE”
UGF10369: “Cool NetBeans Tips and Tricks for Java EE 7 Development”

Q: Tell us about your JavaOne sessions.

Bien: In “Cool NetBeans Tips and Tricks for Java EE 7 Development,” I will introduce my favorite NetBeans features. I think I may surprise some attendees with NetBean's productivity and effectiveness.

In “Architecting Enterprise JavaFX 8 Applications,” I would like to introduce a Model View Presenter Architecture with Dependency Injection based on a "framework," only containing two classes. I would also like to highlight the interaction with SceneBuilder, the JavaFX WYSIWYG editor, without being too heavily dependent on it.

In the session "Demystifying Java EE," I will discuss some recurring misconceptions about the concepts and inner workings of Java EE. There is no magic in Java EE – Java EE 7 is very effective, if you follow some rules.

In “Lean and Opinionated Java EE 7 Applications,” I will introduce opinionated approaches and best practices for the design and implementation of Java EE 7 applications. I'm probably going to shock some architects, but the developers should like this session.

In “Unit Tests Don’t Break: Stress-Testing Java EE Applications,” I plan to stress test a Java EE 7 application and monitor the results in real time. Stress testing is incredibly important and sometimes not even a part of the development cycle.

Q: In addition to your sessions, what do you have planned for JavaOne?

Bien: JavaOne is one of the few conferences where I attend other sessions -- from dawn to dusk. In recent years there was not always time to pick lunch. At NetBeans/GlassFish days before JavaOne I will probably meet some Java friends, while at the actual JavaOne I’ve never managed to do that. The technical content is too good and there is not enough time between the sessions.

Q: Tell us about what’s happening with Enterprise JavaFX 8 apps.

Bien: In the recent edition of airhacks.com I started with HTML 5, but most of the attendees waited for Java FX 8 news. There are a lot of Swing applications out there. Migration from Swing to JavaFX is one of the FAQs. Also JavaFX is "just" Java. You can develop now from the User Interface to the back end using the same language, tools, and environments. You can use the same debugger, profiler or memory analyzer for all of your application tiers and layers. JavaFX suits perfectly enterprise application needs.

Q: What have you been working on lately?

Bien: I’ve helped my customers implement Java EE 7 and JavaFX applications. Also, I ported lightfish.adam-bien.com to Java EE 7 and GlassFish v4 and was even able to simplify the code. I also ported Apache FTP Mina to JavaEE7: http://e2ftp.adam-bien.com

Q: What are your expectations for Java EE 7? For Java SE 8?

Bien: I was already very happy with Java EE 6, so Java EE 7 can only exceed my expectations. I'm using daily builds of JavaFX coming with JDK 1.8 for my "leisure" activities. Here I would expect more stability and even better performance. 

Q: How do you assess the state of Java today?

Bien: Java is more interesting for building apps, than ever. And the interest is huge. This year there is an increased tendency to sell out workshops, sessions and conferences. Java 8 together with Java EE 7 and JavaFX 8 will make it even more interesting.

Java has only one problem: its age. We tend to forget how performant, scalable, ubiquitous, and "cutting edge" the Java ecosystem actually is.

Q: What should Java developers understand about unit testing?

Bien: Don't overdo it. Statistics do not matter. Test complex stuff first -- and there is no difference between writing tests for Java SE and Java EE applications

Q: Tell us about ways NetBeans can be used for Java EE 7 development?

A: With NetBeans I'm still able to surprise seasoned developers with productivity without any magic. As a contractor/freelancer I really don't like to spend any time with IDE maintenance and setup. With NetBeans I'm able to set up my full Java EE environment in about a minute on Linux, Windows or Mac. Without any plugins, configurations or restarts. For that reason, I'm using NetBeans daily builds without any friction. What I like the most: NetBeans supports me with integrated code completion, JavaDoc, hints and occasional helpers on demand (like, e.g., creation of beans.xml or persistence.xml) without excessive code generation or opaque wizards. You can achieve 80% with two shortcuts: ctrl + space and alt + enter.

Adam Bien’s Blog

Tuesday Jul 02, 2013

Belgrade Open Source Software Development Center

A new Open Source Software Development Center is open at University of Belgrade Serbia. It centers around using Java & NetBeans as open source projects to learn from and contribute to. Assistant Professor Zoran Sevarac says that not only does the center allow him to teach software development using open source projects, but also "we are improving our University courses based on the experience we get from working on open source code." 

Some of the projects underway are a NetBeans UML plugin; Neuroph (a Java neural network framework, with a NetBeans Platform-based UI); a NetBeans DOAP Plugin; WorkieTalkie (NetBeans chat plugin); and 2D and 3D visualization plugins for NetBeans. Here's video describing the NetBeans UML plugin:

University of Belgrade also has an official university course about open source development, where students learn to use development tools, work in teams, participate in open source projects and learn from real world software development projects.

Students, teachers, and researchers at the University of Belgrade, and any member of the open source community are welcome to come to learn software development from successful open source projects. For more information, you can contact Zoran Sevarac (@neuroph on Twitter). 

Thursday Jun 20, 2013

Submit your Nominations for 2013 Duke's Choice Awards

The 2013 Duke's Choice Award program is now accepting nominations through July 22nd. The Duke's Choice Awards celebrate innovation in the world of Java technology, and are granted to individuals, organizations and businesses for their compelling use of Java technology. Anyone can now submit a nomination online.

Innovators in Java have received the Duke's Choice Awards for over 10 years. Last year's Duke's Choice Awards winners are featured on Java.net/dukeschoice.

Winners will be announced at JavaOne 2013 in San Francisco. In addition to the Duke Choice Award statue, each winner will receive a full JavaOne SF conference pass and recognition in Java Magazine, The Java Source Blog, and Oracle's Java Developer Newsletter.

Even if you are not submitting this year, help us spread the word by hosting the banner on your website or blog.

Friday May 24, 2013

Book: Instant NetBeans IDE How-To

bookYou've had some Java classes, and you're pretty good at basic coding. How do you make the leap from Java 101 to using an IDE like a professional? Here's a great book to get you on your way. 

Instant NetBeans IDE How-To is for Java developers or anyone who has basic knowledge of Java but has not had much experience with IDEs; you can use this book to rapidly develop Java applications. NetBeans is an open source IDE which is known as a powerful IDE for Java application development. It allows you to write and generate smart code, and utilize drag-and-drop tools. NetBeans gives complete flexibility with full support to developers for all the latest technologies.

Instant NetBeans IDE How-To is a complete practical, hands-on guide that provides you with a number of clear step-by-step recipes, which will help you take advantage of the real power of Java technologies, and give you a good grounding in using it for your projects.

The book shows you how to develop desktop applications, web applications, enterprise applications, mobile applications, and how to deploy applications. It also takes a look at databases, validations, etc. If you want to develop a Java application with just a few clicks and write less code, then this is the book for you.

Instant NetBeans IDE How-To is written by Atul Palandurkar, an experienced developer, member of the Java User Group, Nagpur and the NetBeans User Group, Nagpur. He taught the Java EE & HTML5 Hands on Lab (HOL) using NetBeans IDE at Java One India 2013.

Friday Nov 23, 2012

NetBeans at JavaOne Latin America 2012

The place to be in early December is Sao Paolo, Brazil, for JavaOne 2012 Latin America (pt_ BR site)--and the NetBeans team will be making the trip!

Drop-in on technical sessions and hands-labs that show the latest features of the NetBeans IDE in action. Watch demos of HTML5, CSS3 and JavaScript support in NetBeans IDE 7.3 (Release: Winter 2013) and find out how developers can easily and quickly create rich Web and mobile applications. Discover how the IDE provides the best and latest support for building JavaEE and JavaFX 2.0 applications, and join the conversation about what's up ahead for NetBeans development.

With over 50 technical sessions, tons of demos and labs, JavaOne Latin America is the conference to attend to enhance your coding skills and mingle with experts and developers from the Oracle and Java communities. Mark your calendars and check out NetBeans IDE in the following sessions!


Tuesday, December 4

12:15 - 13:15
Designing Java EE Applications in the Age of CDI
Speakers: Michel Graciano, Consultant, Summa Technologies do Brasil; Michael Santos, TecSinapse
Mezanino: Sala 14


Wednesday, December 5

10:00 - 11:00
Make Your Clients Richer: JavaFX and the NetBeans Platform
Speakers: Gail Anderson, Director of Research; Paul Anderson, Director of Training, Anderson Software Group, Inc.
Mezanino: Sala 12


Thursday, December 6

13:45 - 14:45
Unlocking the Java Platform with NetBeans
Speaker: John Jullion-Ceccarelli, Software Development Director, Oracle
Keynote Hall

15:00 - 16:00
Project EASEL: Developing and Managing HTML5 in a Java World
Speaker: John Jullion-Ceccarelli, Software Development Director, Oracle
Mezanino: Sala 14


See full conference schedule for detailed agenda.

Get more JavaOne news.

Wednesday Nov 21, 2012

Get Started with JavaFX 2 and Scene Builder

Up on otn/java is a very useful article by Oracle Java/Middleware/Core Tech Engineer Mark Heckler, titled, “How to Get Started (FAST!) with JavaFX 2 and Scene Builder.”  Heckler, who has development experience in numerous environments, shows developers how to develop a JavaFX application using Scene Builder “in less time than it takes to drink a cup of coffee, while learning your way around in the process”.

He begins with a warning and a reassurance: “JavaFX is a new paradigm and can seem a bit imposing when you first take a look at it. But remember, JavaFX is easy and fun. Let's give it a try.”

Next, after showing readers how to download and install JDK/JavaFX and Scene Builder, he informs the reader that they will “create a simple JavaFX application, create and modify a window using Scene Builder, and successfully test it in under 15 minutes.”

Then readers download some NetBeans files:
EasyJavaFX.java contains the main application class. We won't do anything with this class for our example, as its primary purpose in life is to load the window definition code contained in the FXML file and then show the main stage/scene. You'll keep the JavaFX terms straight with ease if you relate them to the theater: a platform holds a stage, which contains scenes.

SampleController.java is our controller class that provides the ‘brains’ behind the graphical interface. If you open the SampleController, you'll see that it includes a property and a method tagged with @FXML. This tag enables the integration of the visual controls and elements you define using Scene Builder, which are stored in an FXML (FX Markup Language) file.

Sample.fxml is the definition file for our sample window. You can right-click and Edit the filename in the tree to view the underlying FXML -- and you may need to do that if you change filenames or properties by hand - or you can double-click on it to open it (visually) in Scene Builder.”

Then Scene Builder enters the picture and the task is soon done.

Check out the article here.

Friday Jun 29, 2012

NetBeans IDE 7.2 Release Candidate Available

The first release candidate build of NetBeans IDE 7.2 is available for download.

Download the release candidate build, try out the new features and give your feedback in the NetBeans 7.2 Community Acceptance Survey. Let the NetBeans team know if 7.2 is ready for full release!

You can give additional feedback on the NetBeans mailing lists and forums, file reports, and contact the NetBeans team via Twitter. The final release of NetBeans IDE 7.2 is planned for July.

Thursday Apr 26, 2012

Released: NetBeans IDE 7.1.2, Now Supporting Java SE 7u4

NetBeans IDE 7.1.2 is an update release to versions 7.1 and 7.1.1. Here's what's new:

There are two ways to get the updates:

  • To get the patches only: Launch your current installation of NetBeans IDE 7.1, and an update alert will appear. Click the notification box to install the updates. OR to perform the update manually, select Tools-->Plugins-->Reload Catalog (Updates Tab).

 What's on your mind? Join the NetBeans team on Twitter, Facebook and Google+ and let's discuss!


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