Monday Mar 24, 2014

The Future of Application Development Tools at Oracle

Last week we met with Chris Tonas, Vice President of Mobility and Application Development Tools at Oracle, to hear his take on the latest in the world of Java tooling and development frameworks. 

Q: Can you tell us a little bit about your role at Oracle as it relates to development tools? 

A: I lead the organization that is working on Oracle’s software development tools and frameworks, specifically, the teams that build our offerings for Java developers - whether in NetBeans, Eclipse or JDeveloper. Our team also builds the tools and frameworks that are used by developers working with Oracle’s cloud and mobile platforms.

Q: This week saw the release of JDK8 and NetBeans 8 along with it. How do you view this release? 

A: The release of JDK 8 and NetBeans 8 this week represents a big step forward for both Oracle and the Java Community. A lot of hard work and collaboration went into this milestone and I’d like to take a moment to thank everyone who contributed to this achievement. 

Q: With the new NetBeans 8.0 out, what are the plans for NetBeans going forward? 

A: In the short term, an update release of NetBeans 8 is underway to align with Java ME 8. Additional NetBeans 8 releases that target specific bugs are anticipated to be released after that. Longer term, Oracle is committed to the continued success of both Java and NetBeans. Work on JDK 9 is now underway and we’re planning a NetBeans 9 release to go along with it, as usual. 

Q: As you mentioned Oracle supports more than just the NetBeans IDE. What’s the thinking behind that? 

A: Oracle recognizes that developer tools aren’t a one-size-fits-all proposition. Oracle is a significant contributor to the Eclipse project and we are continuing to extend the capabilities of our Eclipse-based solutions as well. We offer JDeveloper for those who want the tightest alignment with the Oracle Fusion Middleware stack. In addition, we recognize that many JavaScript developers want to use light weight tools, and we are planning to address those needs as well.

Q: What are some of the key trends you see in the software development space right now? 

A: It’s clear that several significant trends are shaping software development and tools. Oracle is at the forefront of these changes and a leader in almost every aspect. We see three main changes happening right now:
  • Java remains the industry standard for server-side development, but we see growing demand to support developers using the combination of JavaScript and HTML5 for the presentation layer. We see JavaScript starting to gain ground for some server side use cases as well.
  • The shift to cloud-based deployment is now mainstream. Development for the cloud presents a new set of challenges and demands a fresh approach.
  • The third shift is the move to mobile. Mobile development must be integrated across the enterprise from the design phase throughout the lifecycle.

As the providers of tools for developers, these changes require an evolution of the tooling and infrastructure used to design and develop applications. 

Q:  So what is Oracle doing to address these developments? 

A: Some of the work has already happened. For example, NetBeans has supported the Java and JavaScript combination for a few releases now. Looking forward, Oracle has several new and innovative browser-based, cloud-centric and mobile initiatives underway that we will be sharing with the community over the next several months.

We are leveraging skills and technology from across our current developer tools organization to develop these new capabilities. We see the new generation of developer tools as complimentary to the tools that developers use and love today. The first of these initiatives that you’ll be able to use will be the forthcoming Oracle Developer Cloud Service – bringing your ALM and team collaboration work to the cloud. You can read more about it at http://cloud.oracle.com/developer 

Q: Where can developers learn more about these new tools? 

A: Just like every year, Oracle’s full vision for the future of software development will be shared at JavaOne and Oracle OpenWorld later this year. Our team is looking forward to sharing what we are working on with the development community.

Q: Thank you for your time, Chris. 

A: You're welcome.

Wednesday Feb 05, 2014

Mobile World Congress (MWC) Coming Up

MWC is the largest international conference for the mobile industry.  From February 25 – 27, experts, leaders and visionaries will discuss the innovations that will transform communication. 

Oracle will showcase its innovative communications services at the Communications Industry Experience Zones. It is located the Oracle Booth # 3B20 (at hall 3).  

Also at the Oracle booth, discover the breadth of Oracle Internet of Things (IoT) offerings and learn how the IoT helped fuel one of the greatest comebacks in sports history. The model of the Oracle Team USA 2013 AC72 yacht will be onsite! Oracle solution experts will be there to answer questions. Don't miss it, Register now! 

Thursday Jan 30, 2014

Internet of Things (IoT) Hackathon in Brazil

SouJava is running a Raspberry Pi and Java hackathon at Campus Party, the week-long technology gathering of geeks, developers, gamers, scientists, and students in Brazil. Sponsored by Oracle Technology Network, the hackathon is designed for enthusiasts who want to create IoT projects with Raspberry Pi and Java. The objectives are for attendees to learn, practice, and innovative while creating an IoT project

Java evangelist Angela Caicedo opened the hackathon with an overview of IoT and Java development. Over two days, participants will build teams, brainstorm, attend training, get a kit from the organizers and hack on their own project. Onsite experts will be available to help participants. They are veteran Java developers of web, enterprise and embedded development. Among them are GlobalCode founder Vinicius Senger, senior developer Rubens Saraiva, SouJava leader Bruno Souza, Java Champion Yara Senger, product manager Bruno Borges and senior mobile developer Ricardo Ogliari 

Learn more about IoT:  
- IoT community page highlighting projects, discussions, hobbyists, and experts

Monday Apr 29, 2013

Open API Hackathon: Win A Trip to JavaOne San Francisco and more!

Orange Labs is running a contest for the next cool app powered by Java, in association with City of Warsaw and with investment partner IQ Partners.

The Grand Prize is an invitation to Oracle OpenWorld 2013 & JavaOne 2013 w San Francisco – hotel, airfare, and admission included! Three first place prizes are internships at Orange Labs. And the best business-oriented application creator IQ Partners SA will help to create own business (great funds are provided!).

The contest is open to any one with a good idea for an application. The application may use resources from the Orange network like location of devices, presence, device or subscriber information, billing or charging, form City Warsaw like P&R location or Veturilo Location. Contestants are encouraged to use other external resources such as weather, finance, health, etc to make their apps compelling and useful.


See registration and details at www.openmiddleware.pl

Hurry!

Registration closes on June 3rd. All registrations will be judged and finalists will be announced at websitewww.openmiddleware.pl.

Learn More at geecon

Attendees at geecon in Krakow, May 15-17 can get more details at these sessions:

Open API Hackathon introductory talk on "Building Mobile Apps Using Network Assets"
by Douglas Tait
16th May 14:40

Discussion panel on "Using the Network to Build Compelling Applications"

16th May 16:00 

Monday Feb 25, 2013

Java Save Lives at Mobile World Congress

Mobile World Congress used to just be about mobile phones and the industry around mobile networks. Now "mobile" has redefined itself and is about sensors everywhere: cars, scooters, buildings, people, etc. The M2M (or "Internet of Everything") revolution is here, with mobile phones as just one of the many components that create an intelligent, connected world. As the mobile industry moves its focus from voice to data, developers now have the entire world as a potential for apps. The world is literally your oyster (sorry, had to).

With all this opportunity comes decisions to make. Todays' developers have a wide range of choices in terms of what device they are going to use and how to control it. How smart is the device? Do you want it to be tailored and tuned to a specific solution or something more broad? How do you get the data from the device to the data center? The device and platform you choice are key components for a successful implementation. Java has been on devices for a long time: smart cards, cars, ATMs, phones, underwater probes, and more. Java enables devices to be intelligent, scalable and supportable. Want to update a device remotely? Done. Want it to be headless? Done. Want a remote sensor on your grandmother that calls the hospital if she falls, and also lets the paramedics open the door to her house? Done. Here's video that shows Java saving grandma's life at Mobile World Congress:

If you are at MWC, drop by the Oracle booth and learn more. You also have a shot at winning a Raspberry Pi at WIPJam @ MWC 2013 event for mobile developers Thursday evening. See how Oracle and Deutsche Telekom have made it possible to make your coffee by phone, by combining a coffee machine, a Raspberry Pi, Java SE and the Deutsche Telekom network. M2M can deliver your favorite brew (and programming language and platform)!

Wednesday Feb 20, 2013

Java in Action at Mobile World Congress

Mobile World Congress next week in Barcelona will be a gathering of over 70,000 people to discuss the state of mobile communications. As the MWC brochure says, "The mobile ecosystem is expanding at lightning speed, with endless innovation and new applications of mobile technology." And Java is right in the mobile mix.

How about using your phone to start a coffeemaker with Java? Come to WIPJam @ MWC 2013, an event for mobile developers, and see how Oracle and Deutsche Telekom have made it possible to make your coffee by phone. By combining Java SE Embedded, a Raspberry Pi, the Deutsche Telekom network, and a coffee machine, you'll see how M2M can deliver your favorite brew. Stop by, you may win a prize!

Join Oracle's Java team and 1,000 developers at WIPJam @ MWC 2013, sponsored by Developer Garden, the developer ecosystem of Deutsche Telekom. They will be featuring the role of Java technologies in their developer platform and kit in their sessions. As developers know, mobile technology has proven itself to be a remarkable platform for innovation, and the opportunities continue to grow.

Tuesday Dec 11, 2012

Call for Papers for both Devoxx UK and France now open!

The two conferences are taking place the last week of March 2013 with London on March 26th and 27 and Paris on March 28th and 29th. Oracle fully supports "Devoxx UK" and "Devoxx France" as a European Platinum Partner. Submit proposals and participate in both conferences since they are a two-hour train ride away from one another.

The Devoxx conferences are designed “for developers by developers.” The conference committees are looking for speakers who are passionate developers unafraid to share their knowledge of Java, mobile, web and beyond. The sessions are about frameworks, tools and development with in-depth conference sessions, short practical quickies, and bird-of-a-feather discussions. Those different formats allow speakers to choose the best way to present their topics and can be mentioned during the submission process

Devoxx has proven its success under Stephan Janssen, organizer of Devoxx in Belgium for the past 11 years. Devoxx has been the biggest Java conference in Europe for many years. To organize those local conferences, Stephan has enrolled the top community leaders in the UK and France. Ben Evans and Martijn Verberg are the leaders of London Java User Group (JUG) and are also known internationally for starting the Adopt-a-JSR program. Antonio Goncalves is the leader of the Paris JUG. He organized last year’s Devoxx France, which was a big success with twice the size first expected.

The organizers made sure to add the local character to the conferences. "The community energy has to feel right," said Ben Evans and for that he picked an "old Victoria hall" for the venue. Those leaders are part of very dynamic Java communities in France and in the UK. France has 22 JUGs; the Paris JUG alone has 2,000 members. The UK has over 50,000 developers working in London and its surroundings; a lot of them are Java developers working in the financial industry. The conference fee is kept as low as possible to encourage those developers to attend. Devoxx promises to be crowded and sold out in advance. Make sure to submit your talks to both Devoxx UK and France before January 31st, 2013. 



Thursday Jun 28, 2012

New Nokia SDK 2.0 for Java (beta)

Nokia recently launched the Asha 305306, and 311, which are full touch devices with smartphone-like functionality at a low price. This makes them particularly attractive to consumers in the developing and developed world who may not be able to afford a smartphone but have a strong demand for apps and the smartphone experience. The Asha phones are the latest addition to Nokia's Series 40 platform, all of which support Java ME.

The SDK includes new Full Touch API's (e.g. supporting pinch zoom) and Sensor support delivering an enhanced App experience. It also adds improved Maps API support for creating socio-local apps. There are a number of improvements in the tools including the Nokia IDE for Java ME with in-build Device-SDK Manager. Many code examples, training videos, webinars and sample code will help get you started. Porting guides and sample code show you how to port your android app to Java ME. If you don't have access to the hardware you can use Remote Device Access to test on real hardware that's remotely hosted for free. You can also find Light Weight UI Toolkit (LWUIT) support, which can speed development significantly. Both In-App Advertising and In-App Purchase (beta) is supported. Here's a great revenue-making opportunity for developers and a great way of reaching a new app-hungry mass-market audience.

Download the new Nokia SDK 2.0 for Java (Beta) and get developing! 

Monday Oct 17, 2011

Greg Bollella and Eric Jensen on the Future of Cyber-Physical Systems with Embedded Java and Berkeley DB

At JavaOne 2011, Greg Bollella, Chief Architect for Embedded Java and Eric Jensen, Oracle Principal Product Manager and a former embedded developer, gave a session (25143) titled “Telemetry and Synchronization with Embedded Java and Berkeley DB”. Bollella has been a leader in the Embedded Java and real-time Java space since Java was first applied there.

The presentation offered a vision of the potential future of Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS), defined as, “a system featuring a tight combination and coordination between the systems computational and physical elements,” that was so powerful that even if the expectations turn out to be exaggerated, CPS technological change will, in a decade or so, significantly alter our lives in pervasive and unforeseeable ways. Bollella went so far as to say that CPS applications have the potential to dwarf the 20th Century IT Revolution.

He drew a contrast between where CPS applications are in use today and where they will be in use tomorrow.

Today: High confidence medical devices and systems; assisted living; process control (metal smelting, chemical plants, refineries); traffic control and safety; advanced automotive systems; energy conservation; environmental control (electric power, water resources, and communications systems); distributed robotics (telepresence, telemedicine); defense systems; manufacturing; smart structures; home automation; building automation; transportation (rail, air, water, road); retail systems (point of sale and monitoring); entertainment industry; mining; industrial control (power generation).

Tomorrow:  Distributed micro-power generation; highly advanced autonomous driver assistance features; networked autonomous automobiles; networked building automation systems; cognitive radio (distributed consensus about bandwidth availability); large-scale RFID-based servicing systems which could acquire the nature of distributed real-time control systems; autonomous air traffic control; advanced industrial and home networked robotics; intelligent traffic control systems; intelligent autonomous power (gas/electricity); distribution systems; networked personal medical monitoring devices.

A lot to take in – the technology all around us growing in intelligence! In 2009, 3.9 billion embedded processors were shipped – the number is expected to double to roughly 8 billion by 2015. Some predict that by 2025 the number will be well into the trillions. And currently, an estimated five times more embedded software is written than all other software today. If the reality is anywhere close to the projections and estimates, we are in for an interesting ride on some intelligent transport.

Telemetry

Bollella went on to discuss telemetry, a term frequently used by NASA and defined as a technology that “allows remote measurement and reporting of information”. Central to telemetry is the idea that the information does not persist on the device after measurement. Uses of telemetry in the automotive realm include streaming operational data from the vehicle to the manufacturer’s IT system for analysis, services for vehicle operator, failure prediction, and feedback to design teams on wear and failure rates. For industrial automation, telemetry is used for failure prediction and to process monitoring and reporting

Synchronization

Bollella explained that his use of synchronization is idiosyncratic to database technology and involves two synchronized databases containing the same set of data and relationships. Any change in one database appears (after some indeterminate delay) in the other. The information on the device persists on the device as long as it does on the backend

The use cases for synchronization are widespread and include:

•    Healthcare: Telemedicine, Home health systems, Mobile health practitioners
•    Industrial: Manufacturing, Mining
•    Energy: Smart Grid, Energy Management
•    Entertainment: TVs, set top boxes, automotive rear-seat entertainment
•    Distribution/Shipping: Everything from local deliveries to transoceanic cargo shipments
•    Government: Border Control, Resource Management, Customs, Immigration, Land Management, Forest Service, etc
•    Law Enforcement/Military: Police officers and soldiers in the field, also aboard Naval vessels
•    Retail: Real time inventory linked to point-of-sale transactions
•    Distribution/Shipping: Everything from local deliveries to transoceanic cargo shipments

Bollella acknowledged that serious development challenges remain. The current state of CPS connectivity is poor, with the vast majority being standalone. Given the highly connected world of social networking, mobile devices, and the web, this might be surprising. But it is important to consider that these are two technological areas have evolved in environments with different demands. CPS is focused on real-time, predictability, safety, security, and fault tolerance; the Web is a different matter.

CPS requires real-time with predictable control loops -- there are no standard communication protocols or Ethernet or “IP-over” functionality on devices. There are harsh environments, especially in spacecrafts, that can affect wired Ethernet, and there exists incompatibility of data formats and communication protocols with IT standards.

Perhaps of greatest importance, there has been little perceived need for CPS connectivity with devices. But this is changing rapidly, and with it, obstacles are being overcome as one of the major trends in embedded is connectivity development. Bollella admitted that there were a lot of unknowns going into the future, but the challenges are not insurmountable.

Oracle’s Eric Jensen took over and gave some details about the Oracle Berkeley DB and the Oracle Database Mobile Server, which he characterized as the best way to synchronize mobile or embedded applications that utilize SQLite or Berkeley DB with an Oracle backend. The embedded Java platform, when coupled with Berkeley DB and Database Mobile Server, has the ability to manage networks of embedded devices using existing enterprise frameworks in a way that could prove to be quite revolutionary

It will be interesting to look back in 10 years and see how much Cyber-Physical Systems have, or have not, changed the world.

Getting Started with Embedded Java -- Sense, Control, Connect, Store, Sync

At JavaOne 2011, Terrence Barr, Senior Technologist, Mobile & Embedded, Oracle Germany, presided over a two-hour HOL (Hands-On-Lab) on Monday in which he taught developers how to build an embedded Java solution that senses and controls the environment, stores data, and connects to back-end databases for synchronization and further processing. The session offered considerable detail along with step-by-step exercises as participants learned how to create the embedded EnviroTracker system and application which tracks and processes environmental data. The application interfaces with a microcontroller to read sensor input (ambient light brightness), to control output (and LED), and then further processes the sensor data.

The lab focused on:
• The benefits of Java technology in the embedded space
• The components of embedded Java platforms
• Setting up an embedded Java platform
• Interfacing between the embedded Java platform, the microcontroller, and I/O
• Accessing and controlling I/O from Java
• Processing sensor data

Barr took developers through seven basic tasks or exercises:

1. Create the EnviroTracker
2. Install the OJEC (Oracle Java ME Embedded Client) on the Development Host
The Oracle Java Micro Edition Embedded Client (OJEC) implements the CDC Platform configuration.
3. Develop and Test Your First Embedded Java Application..
4. Install OJEC on the Target Platform and Run Your Java Application
5: Understand I/O and the Arduino Microcontroller
6: EnviroTracker V1: First Contact
7: EnviroTracker V2: Continuous Monitoring and Processing

By the end of a rigorous and demanding, but satisfying two hours, attendees had built a real-world embedded system and created the EnviroTracker Application to track environmental sensor data. They learned how to install and use embedded Java runtimes and tools, and how to interface with I/O devices and microcontrollers from Java applications.

The take home message: Creating sophisticated embedded Java systems and applications is easy due to the platform independence of the Java language and runtime, the scalability of pre-existing Java skills to embedded development, and the comprehensive support provided by mature and feature-rich developer tools.

For more info, go to Terrence Barr's blog.

About

Insider News from the Java Team at Oracle!

duke
javeone logo
Links


Search

Archives
« April 2014
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
  
2
5
6
7
12
13
17
18
19
20
22
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
   
       
Today