Wednesday Nov 21, 2012

Get Started with JavaFX 2 and Scene Builder

Up on otn/java is a very useful article by Oracle Java/Middleware/Core Tech Engineer Mark Heckler, titled, “How to Get Started (FAST!) with JavaFX 2 and Scene Builder.”  Heckler, who has development experience in numerous environments, shows developers how to develop a JavaFX application using Scene Builder “in less time than it takes to drink a cup of coffee, while learning your way around in the process”.

He begins with a warning and a reassurance: “JavaFX is a new paradigm and can seem a bit imposing when you first take a look at it. But remember, JavaFX is easy and fun. Let's give it a try.”

Next, after showing readers how to download and install JDK/JavaFX and Scene Builder, he informs the reader that they will “create a simple JavaFX application, create and modify a window using Scene Builder, and successfully test it in under 15 minutes.”

Then readers download some NetBeans files:
EasyJavaFX.java contains the main application class. We won't do anything with this class for our example, as its primary purpose in life is to load the window definition code contained in the FXML file and then show the main stage/scene. You'll keep the JavaFX terms straight with ease if you relate them to the theater: a platform holds a stage, which contains scenes.

SampleController.java is our controller class that provides the ‘brains’ behind the graphical interface. If you open the SampleController, you'll see that it includes a property and a method tagged with @FXML. This tag enables the integration of the visual controls and elements you define using Scene Builder, which are stored in an FXML (FX Markup Language) file.

Sample.fxml is the definition file for our sample window. You can right-click and Edit the filename in the tree to view the underlying FXML -- and you may need to do that if you change filenames or properties by hand - or you can double-click on it to open it (visually) in Scene Builder.”

Then Scene Builder enters the picture and the task is soon done.

Check out the article here.

Monday Sep 10, 2012

Expressing the UI for Enterprise Applications with JavaFX 2.0 FXML - Part Two

A new article by Oracle’s Java Champion Jim Weaver, titled “Expressing the UI for Enterprise Applications with JavaFX 2.0 FXML -- Part Two,” now up on otn/java, shows developers how to leverage the power of the FX Markup Language to define the UI for enterprise applications. Weaver, the author of Pro JavaFX Platform, extends the SearchDemoFXML example used in Part One to include more concepts and techniques for creating an enterprise application using FXML.

Weaver concludes the article by summarizing its content, “FXML provides the ability to radically change the UI without modifying the controller. This task can be accomplished by loading different FXML documents, leveraging JavaFX cascading style sheets, and creating localized resource bundles. Named parameters can be used with these features to provide relevant information to an application at startup.”


Check out the article here.





Wednesday Sep 07, 2011

Unit Testing for Java EE tech article on OTN

A new article, titled “Unit Testing for Java EE,” by Java Champion Adam Bien, is up on otn/java’s front page. Bien points out that too many developers believe that testing Java EE applications is too hard, inconvenient, or complex, something that has not been true since the advent of Java EE 5 more than five years ago.

Bien explains: “There is nothing special about unit testing Java EE 6 applications. You only have to add the JUnit library into your pom.xml file (see Listing 5) and put your classes into the src/test/java directory. All JUnit tests will be executed automatically during the standard Maven lifecycle: mvn clean install.”

He goes on to make use of “Mockito” an easy-to-use, open source mocking library. Bien writes:

“Mockito is able to create ‘smart proxies’ (a.k.a. mocks) from classes or interfaces. These proxies do not come with any behavior, but they are still perfectly usable. You can invoke methods, but will get the default values, or null, back. The behavior of the mocks can be recorded after their creation with when(mock.getAnswer()).then(42) syntax.

Mockito is perfectly suitable for ‘simulating’ any inconvenient classes, resources, or services. You can start with Mockito just by knowing a single class org.mockito.Mockito. The when-then ‘domain specific language’ is composed of static methods from the Mockito class. The org.mockito.Mockito class is well documented. In fact, the whole documentation set was generated from the JavaDoc markup in the org.mockito.Mockito class.”

Read the complete article here.

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