Wednesday Mar 05, 2014

JavaOne 2014 Call for Papers Now Open!

It is time to submit all those talks you have been thinking about. "We have a huge focus on community at this event, and it would be great to have many proposals from the developer community." explains JavaOne Content Chair Stephen Chin.

There is a new dedicated track for Agile development this year, making a total of nine Java tracks.  This year's tracks are: 

• Clients and UI
• Core Java Platform
• Internet of Things
• Java Virtual Machine Languages
• Java and Security
• Tools and Techniques
• Server-Side Java
• Java in the Cloud
• Agile Development

There is no time to waste! The call for papers closes April 15th at 11:59 p.m. PDT  

You will receive a complimentary pass to JavaOne with an accepted talk.

There is a rolling submission process, so submit early! 

Wednesday Mar 27, 2013

Real-Time Topic Modeling of Microblogs

A new article published on the front page of otn/java, by Yogesh Tewari and Rajesh Kawad, of Infosys Limited Labs in Bangalore, India, titled “Real-Time Topic Modeling of Microblogs,” explores “the challenge of real-time extraction of topics from a continuous stream of incoming microblogs or tweets that are particular to an application” that they created. From a simple tweet text, the application is designed to accurately suggest relevant topics discussed in the tweet, and provide real-time timelines of topics generated from the tweet streams.

They explain that this is no simple tasks since a tweet, “considered as a text corpus, contains only 140 characters and second, given their brevity, tweets may not provide useful information and may contain different forms of text such as ‘smileys’ and short-form URLs. Finally, tweets are generated in real time.”

Yogesh and Rajesh apply LDA (latent Dirichlet allocation) to topic model tweets and make use of the Machine Learning for Language Toolkit (MALLET) API as the implementation for LDA – all performed in a Java environment. The LDA implementation is in turn encapsulated within the MALLET API, which here functions as a command line–based Java tool.

As they state: “Our targets are the actual Java classes that perform the LDA logic whose methods we invoke with required input in real-time. Storm is our choice of a free and open source distributed real time computation engine implemented in Java and running in a distributed mode. Storm is highly scalable and easily capable of handling incoming tweet streams. We use Twitter4J to stream tweets, which require valid Twitter authentication. So our task is to design a topology that will consume tweet streams and output a timeline of topics.”
Check out the article here.

Wednesday Jan 30, 2013

Nashorn, the JavaScript Implementation in Java 8

In this Interview, Marcus Lagergren, who works on the dynamic language team at Oracle, discussed the Nashorn project.  "Nashorn is the JavaScript runtime based on InvokeDynamic for the Java Virtual Machine (JVM)" he explains. The Nashorn project is now part of the OpenJDK

The performance is much better than its predecessor Rhino. "We totally blow it out of the water now that we have specific tools to run other things than Java on the JVM." Marcus commented. "The pluggability between JavaScript and Java is another good thing" he added.

His Devoxx talk about Nashorn is now freely accessible at Nashorn - implementing dynamic languages on the JVM
Marcus Lagergren's twitter handle is @lagergren. Nashorn blog has the latest on the project

Thursday Sep 27, 2012

Talking JavaOne with Rock Star Raghavan Srinivas

Raghavan Srinivas, affectionately known as “Rags,” is a two-time JavaOne Rock Star (from 2005 and 2011) who, as a Developer Advocate at Couchbase, gets his hands dirty with emerging technology directions and trends. His general focus is on distributed systems, with a specialization in cloud computing. He worked on Hadoop and HBase during its early stages, has spoken at conferences world-wide on a variety of technical topics, conducted and organized Hands-on Labs and taught graduate classes.

He has 20 years of hands-on software development and over 10 years of architecture and technology evangelism experience and has worked for Digital Equipment Corporation, Sun Microsystems, Intuit and Accenture. He has evangelized and influenced the architecture of numerous technologies including the early releases of JavaFX, Java, Java EE, Java and XML, Java ME, AJAX and Web 2.0, and Java Security.

Rags will be giving these sessions at JavaOne 2012:
  • CON3570 -- Autosharding Enterprise to Social Gaming Applications with NoSQL and Couchbase
  • CON3257 -- Script Bowl 2012: The Battle of the JVM-Based Languages (with Guillaume Laforge, Aaron Bedra, Dick Wall, and Dr Nic Williams)


Rags emphasized the importance of the Cloud: “The Cloud and the Big Data are popular technologies not merely because they are trendy, but, largely due to the fact that it's possible to do massive data mining and use that information for business advantage,” he explained.

I asked him what we should know about Hadoop. “Hadoop,” he remarked, “is mainly about using commodity hardware and achieving unprecedented scalability. At the heart of all this is the Java Virtual Machine which is running on each of these nodes. The vision of taking the processing to where the data resides is made possible by Java and Hadoop.”

And the most exciting thing happening in the world of Java today? “I read recently that Java projects on github.com are just off the charts when compared to other projects. It's exciting to realize the robust growth of Java and the degree of collaboration amongst Java programmers.”

He encourages Java developers to take advantage of Java 7 for Mac OS X which is now available for download. At the same time, he also encourages us to read the caveats.

Originally published on blogs.oracle.com/javaone.

Wednesday Sep 26, 2012

Talking JavaOne with Rock Star Adam Bien

Among the most celebrated developers in recent years, especially in the domain of Java EE and JavaFX, is consultant Adam Bien, who, in addition to being a JavaOne Rock Star for Java EE sessions given in 2009 and 2011, is a Java Champion, the winner of Oracle Magazine’s 2011 Top Java Developer of the Year Award, and recently won a 2012 JAX Innovation Award as a top Java Ambassador.

Bien will be presenting the following sessions:

  • TUT3907 - Java EE 6/7: The Lean Parts
  • CON3906 - Stress-Testing Java EE 6 Applications Without Stress
  • CON3908 - Building Serious JavaFX 2 Applications
  • CON3896 - Interactive Onstage Java EE Overengineering

I spoke with Bien to get his take on Java today. He expressed excitement that the smallest companies and startups are showing increasing interest in Java EE. “This is a very good sign,” said Bien. “Only a few years ago J2EE was mostly used by larger companies -- now it becomes interesting even for one-person shows. Enterprise Java events are also extremely popular. On the Java SE side, I'm really excited about Project Nashorn.”

Nashorn is an upcoming JavaScript engine, developed fully in Java by Oracle, and based on the Da Vinci Machine (JSR 292) which is expected to be available for Java 8.  

Bien expressed concern about a common misconception regarding Java's mediocre productivity. “The problem is not Java,” explained Bien, “but rather systems built with ancient patterns and approaches. Sometimes it really is ‘Cargo Cult Programming.’ Java SE/EE can be incredibly productive and lean without the unnecessary and hard-to-maintain bloat. The real problems are ‘Ivory Towers’ and not Java’s lack of productivity.”

Bien remarked that if there is one thing he wanted Java developers to understand it is that, "Premature optimization is the root of all evil. Or at least of some evil. Modern JVMs and application servers are hard to optimize upfront. It is far easier to write simple code and measure the results continuously. Identify the hotspots first, then optimize.”

He advised Java EE developers to, “Rethink everything you know about Enterprise Java. Before you implement anything, ask the question: ‘Why?’ If there is no clear answer -- just don't do it. Most well known best practices are outdated. Focus your efforts on the domain problem and not the technology.”

Looking ahead, Bien said, “I would like to see open source application servers running directly on a hypervisor. Packaging the whole runtime in a single file would significantly simplify the deployment and operations.”

Check out a recent Java Magazine interview with Bien about his Java EE 6 stress monitoring tool here.

Originally published on blogs.oracle.com/javaone.



Tuesday Jul 24, 2012

The JVM Language Summit - 2012

A new article, now up on otn/java, provides information about the upcoming 2012 JVM Language Summit, scheduled for July 30–August 1, 2012 on the Oracle campus in Santa Clara. The Summit brings together top language designers, compiler writers, tool builders, runtime engineers, and VM architects, from around the world for an open technical collaboration.

Summit organizer Brian Goetz of Oracle remarks: "We've been running the JVM Language Summit for the past five years. The attendees at the Summit are the people who are making languages on the JVM happen—there are typically architect-level representatives from many JVM language communities including JRuby, Jython, Scala, Groovy, and Clojure. This is a tremendous opportunity for the community to influence the future direction of the JVM and for us to learn more about how the JVM is being used, where it shines, and where it falls short."

The schedule is equally divided between traditional presentations, most of which are limited to 40 minutes, and informal workshops, which consist of small facilitated discussion groups among self-selected participants to enable deeper dives into the subject matter. There will also be impromptu lightning talks.

Learn more here.


Monday Jul 16, 2012

Introducing Groovy

Oracle developer Jim Driscoll has a new article up on otn/java, titled “Introducing Groovy,” that shows readers how to master the basics of Groovy, a general-purpose scripting language that runs on the Java Virtual Machine (JVM) – and, as Driscoll emphasizes -- one that can largely be viewed as a superset of Java.

He presents a “Hello World” program that can be understood as either a Java or Groovy program and will compile and run in either environment. Driscoll takes readers through the intricate connections and disconnects between Java and Groovy. For example, Groovy is public by default and “Groovy deals with String objects using double quotation marks with strings” which “allows for variable substitution”. And, “there are also strings with single quotation marks.”

Driscoll illustrates his points with copious code that illustrates how Java developers can tweak their own knowledge of Java to take advantage of Groovy’s strengths, so that, by the end of the article, the (Java-informed) reader more or less understands Groovy.

Check out the article here.

Friday Feb 17, 2012

Michael Hüttermann on Agile ALM

A new interview on otn/java with Java Champion and Agile ALM expert Michael Hüttermann titled “Agile ALM: A Conversation with Java Champion and ALM Expert Michael Hüttermann,” explores ways to streamline the software development process through strategies that include task-based development, continuous integration, practical Scrum implementation, and more.

In the interview, Hüttermann explains the purpose of Agile ALM:

“Agile ALM provides structure for Agile. It’s up to the people who implement Agile ALM to apply Agile values (such as respect and open communication), Agile strategies (such as continuous integration, continuous inspection, and continuous deployment), and Agile processes (such as Scrum). It’s very important to be open-minded regarding the tools you use and to be free to switch from one tool to another. This is part of the continuous improvement process in which developers reflect continuously about what the team is doing and how to improve.”

He goes on to explore the strengths of different tool chains:

“One appealing tool chain integrates JIRA, Hudson, Eclipse, Mylyn, and FishEye. This tool chain fosters task-based development spanning different project roles and project phases. Another interesting chain is to connect Java with Scala and Groovy in order to leverage specific features of different languages on the Java Virtual Machine (JVM). This can be helpful, for example, for setting up an environment for specifying and developing software collaboratively. Scala, with the specs2 library, and Groovy, with the easyb library, are examples of writing acceptance tests or applying behavior-driven development on the JVM where programmers and testers share the same infrastructure and are, thus, forced to work together closely.”

Read the complete article here.

Thursday Feb 02, 2012

Java Champion Dick Wall on Genetics, the Java Posse, and Alternative Languages (Part One)

In Part One of a two-part interview, titled “Java Champion Dick Wall on Genetics, the Java Posse, and Alternative Languages (Part One),” Java Champion and Java Posse member Dick Wall explores the potential of genetic analysis to enhance human health, shares observations about alternative languages for the Java Virtual Machine (JVM), and reveals inside dope on the Java Posse. Wall admits to learning from Brian Goetz, Java language architect at Oracle, that pretty much everything he thought he knew about optimizing for the JVM was wrong, and discusses not only his current work using Scala to enhance our capacity to gain knowledge of our genetic vulnerabilities, but shares what he has learned about his own genetic challenges. In addition, he recounts some adventures with the Java Posse.

From the interview:

“…when I started working in Scala, I was worried that lots of extra immutable objects, which are created when you use immutable data often, would result in a lot more work for the garbage collector. After talking with Brian about it, I realized that, in fact, the opposite is often or usually true. Short-lived, immutable objects usually exist in a special part of the JVM’s memory referred to as Eden. Releasing the memory back to the pool from there is almost without cost. It is only longer-lived objects that get promoted to the JVM main heap that are expensive to garbage collect. So lots of small, short-lived objects can actually help the garbage collector out. There are other ways immutability can help or hurt performance, but ultimately, I decided to code for style and correctness first and worry about performance if and when it becomes an issue.”

Read the interview here.

Tuesday Oct 25, 2011

Perspectives on Garbage Collection

In a new article, part of the Developer Insight series, and titled “The Developer Insight Series, Part 6: Perspectives on Garbage Collection,” now up on otn/java, three leading Java developers offer insight into garbage collection.

Oracle Lab’s Ron Goldman notes, that, “Although automatic memory management has existed for more than 50 years, a lot of people still don't want it in their systems because it seems inelegant. It just strikes people as wrong – ‘It's my memory. I should be releasing it when I know it's no longer being used.’ Theoretically, that might be true, but in practice, programmers continue to forget to free up memory when they are done with it, or, even worse, try to free it up while it's still in use. The results? Buggy code that is apt to crash unexpectedly.”

Java Champion Kirk Pepperdine observes that, “Even though collection of very short-lived objects is almost free, high rates of object churn can still result in very inefficient GC numbers. Sometimes, the problem is simply that the Java Virtual Machine (JVM) doesn't have enough heap space. Monitoring GC activity will give you the hints you need for a successful heap-sizing exercise…”

And Oracle’s GC expert Tony Printesiz takes on eight myths about garbage collection, four of which are:

1. Reference counting GC will solve all my latency problems.
2. malloc and free will always perform better than GC.
3. Finalizers should be called promptly, as soon as objects become unreachable.
4. GC will eliminate all memory leaks.

The article provides a good context for developers to collect their thoughts about garbage. ;)

Read the complete article here.

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