Tuesday Oct 18, 2011

JavaOne 2011 Recap

The 2011 JavaOne Conference, the sixteenth, had its own distinctive identity. The Conference theme, “Moving Java Forward,” coincided with the spirit that seemed to pervade the attendees – after more than a year-and-a-half of stewardship over Java, there was a clear and reassuring feeling that Oracle was doing its part to support Java and the Java community. Attendees that I spoke to felt that the conference was well put together and that the Java platform was being well served and indeed, moving forward.

For me, personally, it was a week in which my feet barely touched the ground as I rushed through tours from session to laptop to session, dashing off blogs and racing back to events, socials, awards ceremonies, BOF's and more.

The Keynotes

Start with the keynotes. Monday’s Technical Keynote debuted and open-sourced JavaFX 2.0, looked ahead to Java EE on the cloud and reminded us that there are about 6.5 billion people in the world and five billion Java Cards.

Tuesday’s Java Strategy Keynote offered Oracle's long-term vision for investment and innovation in Java.

Thursday’s Java Community Keynote while touched by the awareness of Steve Jobs’ passing, celebrated Java User Groups, Duke’s Choice and JCP award winners, and was capped off with the inimitable Java Posse.

Sessions, Sessions, and more Sessions

And then there were the sessions!

JavaFX 2.0, which was represented in more than 50 sessions, deserves special mention.

There was a lively panel discussion of the future of Java EE and the cloud.

Oracle’s Java Technology Evangelist Simon Ritter, in his session, showed off a fun gadget that worked via JavaFX 2.0.

Oracle’s Greg Bollella and Eric Jensen, gave a session titled “Telemetry and Synchronization with Embedded Java and Berkeley DB” that presented a vision of the potential future of Cyber-Physical Systems

Java Champion Michael Hüttermann explained best Agile ALM practices in a session.

Oracle’s Joseph Darcy took developers deeper into the heads and tails of Project Coin.

A JCP panel talked about JCP.next and the future of the JCP.

The JCP Awards gave recognition to some well-deserving people.

Oracle’s Kelly O’Hair gave a session on OpenJDK development best practices.

Oracle’s Terrence Barr showed developers how to get started with Embedded Java(http://blogs.oracle.com/javaone/entry/getting_started_with_embedded_java).

The Duke's Choice Awards reminded us of the sheer ingenuity of Java and Java developers.

Adam Bien, Java Champion, Java Rock Star and winner of Oracle Magazine’s ninth annual Editors' Choice award as Java Developer of the Year was all over the place.

Go to Parley’s.com to take in some of the great sessions.

Monday Oct 17, 2011

OpenJDK Development Best Practices

At JavaOne 2011, Oracle Principal Member of Technical Staff, Kelly O’Hair, had a session on “OpenJDK Development Best Practices” that offered a lot of useful practical advice. He discussed current OpenJDK development procedures such as building, testing, code review, and creating a changeset, and integrating that changeset into a team repository.  In addition he covered "OpenJDK Developers' Guide" topics and looked at the challenges of integrating a change.

So what are the best practices when working on the JDK?
● When in doubt, ask
● When something does not work, report it
● Always be careful, rushing in changes is dangerous
● Do no harm, have a backup or backout plan
● Stay calm, nervous people make mistakes
● Be prepared for anything, because it will happen

When editing sources:
● No TABS
● Never edit the legal notices
● Respect the existing formatting
● Small surgical changes are best, easiest to review
● Well written comments are critical
● Do not assume anything about the compilers

Testcases are critical and not optional:
● Create a new one or modify an existing testcase
● Must be solid and work on all supported systems
● Must not be a resource hog (open 20,000 files)
● Must work in a shared VM mode (like a JUnit test)
● Assume someone else might be running the same test at the same time, and that someone might be you
● Continuous Build & Test
● Test gates or baseline testing
● But before you even get started making changes you must be able to completely build it and test it on your own system, this is a fundamental
● Linux builds are the easiest, so let's see what needs to happen

He suggested best practices short cuts for building:
● Always use local disk space
● Use /tmp if it has the space
● Try export HOTSPOT_BUILD_JOBS=4
● Try export ALT_PARALLEL_COMPILE_JOBS=4
● Use export NO_DOCS=true to avoid running javadoc
● Use ALT_JDK_IMPORT_PATH=${HOME}/jdk1.8.0

Kelly offered detailed principles related to testing, testing prep, editing, code review, changeset creation, why a push fails, and the team repository model.

His core ideas:
● Pick your environment, Linux is easiest
● Pick a stable state of repos, promoted build, oldest best
● Learn to build and test it, over and over, know what to expect, create a jdk to use as your import
● Editing working set files, read the Mercurial book
● Problemlist, changeset creation

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