Tuesday Apr 26, 2016

New Java Champion Pratik Patel

Welcome New Java Champion Pratik Patel


Pratik Patel is a long time Java expert, advocate and community organizer. While working as a graduate student at the University of North Carolina’s SunSITE research lab (which was sponsored by Sun Microsystems), he learned about Java and was immediately hooked by the potential of the platform and the language. That year, in 1996, he co-authored the 2nd book on Java. The following year, he wrote the first book on enterprise Java. He went on to implement large-scale Java based systems in investment banking, health-care and telco in various places in the world including New York, London, and Hong Kong.

Starting in 2005, Pratik became involved with the Atlanta Java User’s Group (AJUG), and later became a board member. His work in bringing the world’s experts on Java technology to Atlanta have helped make DevNexus one of the largest community run Java centric conferences in the world. Around the same time, he started to share his deep knowledge of Java and the JVM to developers in the USA and around the world. He is a frequent speaker at the No Fluff Just Stuff tour and other Java-centric conferences. He also is the primary organizer of DevNexusJr, a venture that is part of AJUG to bring the joy of programming to the next generation of developers. Follow him at @prpatel

The Java Champions are an exclusive group of passionate Java technology and community leaders who are community-nominated and selected under a project sponsored by Oracle. Learn more about Java Champions


Monday Apr 11, 2016

Java Magazine March/April Issue

By Java Magazine Editor Andrew Binstock

Welcome to the March/April issue of Java Magazine in which we dig into the inner workings of Java and the JVM. This issue is pure nerd-stim: bits and bytes have never been as much fun as exploring how the JVM manages garbage collectors and code caches. All good developers are mindful of how their code executes, but due to constant advances in the language and the JVM, knowing what's going on behind the scenes is not always easy.

So, let's dig in. We start by looking into the fundamentals of just-in-time (JIT) compilation in the JVM, we compare the performance of different garbage collectors, and then we update an article on the JVM's code cache and its effects on performance. To these, we add deep dives into how Java itself works: how annotations are handled and how to write your own annotations; plus we examine how the Java Collections Framework was optimized using laziness, which is a technique that is available to you in your code.

The rest of the issue shows off Golo, a new JVM language; better persistence in Java EE; and how enums work in Java--all topped off by our famous language quiz, our no-holds-barred book review, and my editorial, which discusses a new proposal by the Java team to add greater type inference to the language. Enjoy! 

Read this new edition of the Java Magazine


Wednesday Mar 30, 2016

Last Interactive Online Java Webinar with Q&A

 The Virtual Technology Summit (VTS) delivers interactive Java technical content from Java Champions and Oracle experts to your desk.  

The interactive, online event, is sponsored by the Oracle Technology Network (OTN). The April 5 event is the last one in this VTS series. It features six Java technical sessions about Java EE, cloud, and Java SE API. Register now

The Java Track includes three code-heavy sessions:

Java on Mobile: Thanks to innovations in mobile JVM's and the availability of JavaFX on iOS and Android, it is now possible to write applications once (in Java) and deploy them on the major mobile platforms. In this session, we will show how easy it is to create a highly-polished Material Design Java application, and to deploy it on an Android device and an iOS device with exactly the same code used in both deployments.

Asynchronous programming in Java 8: how to use CompletableFuture: This presentation aims to explain how the patterns introduced by this interface and its implementing class are new to the Java platform, and how they fill the gap in the old Future patterns.The different models are precisely presented: how to create complex asynchronous processing pipelines, how to deal with exceptions, how to test complex code. 

Down-to-Earth Microservices with Java EE: the session explores microservices using a simple but representative example using Java EE. You'll see how the Java EE programming model and APIs like JAX-RS, WebSocket, JSON-P, Bean Validation, CDI, JPA, EJB 3, JMS 2 and JTA aligns with the concept of microservices.

Java SE 8 for Java EE Developers: Java SE 8 brings a bounty of improvements. In this session, you will learn about Lambda expressions, a new Date and Time API, the Streams API, Completable Futures, Nashorn, Repeatable Annotations, String joiners, etc.

Thinking Beyond ORM in JPA:  This session discusses native-query support in JPA along with stored procedures and result set mappings in JPA 2.1. The presented code samples illustrate the details of the API, highlighting their strengths and weaknesses. Our analysis reveals applicable use cases and most popular approaches. The summary provides guidelines on how and when to utilize native queries.

Visualizing Data in the Cloud with Oracle JET: Oracle JET is a free and open source toolkit, providing a solid basis for enterprise JavaScript applications, including built-in solutions for accessibility, modularity, and data visualization. In this code-driven session, you will learn everything you need to know to create maintainable enterprise applications in JavaScript!

Thursday Mar 10, 2016

New Java Champion Marcus Lagergren

Welcome the new Java Champion Marcus Lagergren!

Marcus Lagergren has been involved with the Java platform since the alpha versions. He worked at Appeal Virtual Machines, a performance-oriented start-up offering alternatives to byte code interpretation, slow-running thread implementations and non-native code. As one of the principal architects of the JRockit JVM, Marcus helped make sure that Java became a good alternative to writing programs in native languages. 

Marcus contributed to virtual implementations of Java on hypervisors, when virtualization was still in its infancy, and demonstrated with the JRockit VE project that virtual solutions are good alternatives to physical platforms.  

Marcus worked as a member of the Java language team implementing Java 8. He worked on improving support for dynamic languages on the JVM. Being a performance engineer at heart, Marcus demonstrated that dynamic languages, thanks to invokedynamic, achieve similar performance on the JVM compared to languages with a static type system. 

Marcus has co-authored a book on JVM internals, “Oracle JRockit - The Definitive Guide”. He is also a frequent speaker at Java conferences. Follow him @lagergren

The Java Champions are an exclusive group of passionate Java technology and community leaders who are community-nominated and selected under a project sponsored by Oracle. Learn more about Java Champions

Wednesday Mar 09, 2016

The State of the Module System

Original Post from Java Architect Mark Reinhold about the Jigsaw Project

This is an informal overview of enhancements to the Java SE Platform prototyped in Project Jigsaw and proposed for JSR 376: The Java Platform Module System. A related document describes enhancements to JDK-specific tools and APIs, which are outside the scope of the JSR.

As described in the JSR, the specific goals of the module system are to provide
• Reliable configuration, to replace the brittle, error-prone class-path mechanism with a means for program components to declare explicit dependences upon one another, along with

• Strong encapsulation, to allow a component to declare which of its public types are accessible to other components, and which are not.

These features will benefit application developers, library developers, and implementors of the Java SE Platform itself directly and, also, indirectly, since they will enable a scalable platform, greater platform integrity, and improved performance.

Contents: 
1 Defining Modules 
2 Using Modules 
3 Compatibility & Migration 
4 Services 
5 Advanced Topics 

Read the full post 

Tuesday Mar 08, 2016

Generic Specialization

Project Valhalla proposes to bring value types and specialized generics to Java. In this talk, Java Language Architect Brian Goetz offers some of the highlights of the progress and pitfalls of adding these features to the Java Language and VM.

More information:
Project Valhalla - http://openjdk.java.net/projects/valhalla/
Java 9 - http://openjdk.java.net/projects/jdk9/ 

Tuesday Jan 05, 2016

New Java Champion Rafael Winterhalter

Congratulations to the new Java Champion: Rafael Winterhalter!

Rafael Winterhalter works as a software consultant in Oslo, Norway. He is a proponent of static typing and a JVM enthusiast with particular interests in code instrumentation, concurrency and functional programming. 

Rafael blogs about software development, and regularly presents at conferences. He is a JavaOne Rock Star speaker. When coding outside of work, he contributes to a wide range of open source projects and is a main contributor of Byte Buddy project, a library for simple runtime code generation for the Java virtual machine. He was awarded the Duke's Choice award. 

Rafael is an active member in the Norwegian JUG, javaBin, and a member of the JavaZone Program committee. He is also the co-organizer of Oslo JUG meetups. 

Homepage: http://rafael.codes, blog: https://mydailyjava.blogspot.no

Follow him on Twitter: @rafaelcodes

Thursday Sep 24, 2015

Perspectives on Java Evolution!

To mark twenty years of innovation, the May/June issue of Java Magazine interviewed Mark Reinhold, chief architect of the Java Platform Group at Oracle. Reinhold described what has surprised him most about Java's evolution, discussed the importance of retaining the "feel of Java," and offered his opinion on Oracle's stewardship of Java during the interview

He also explained the recipe for how Java evolves: identifying a pain point, figuring out what abstractions are missing, and then adding those abstractions. With that recipe in mind, he discussed the two pain points that Java SE 9 will address: Java is a huge, monolithic platform and large applications tend to be brittle. Both pain points will be addressed in Java SE 9 with a common solution: modules.

In addition, Reinhold discussed his career and day-to-day activities, and he offered some advice to novice developers. Read the interview here.

Tuesday Sep 08, 2015

Nashorn and Stored Procedures

JavaScript is one of the most popular languages and the natural choice for processing JSON documents. To process millions of JSON documents would you rather perform the processing in-place or ship the data to a middle-tier engine?

In the next VTS, Kuassi Mensah explains how stored procedures help in-database processing while avoiding data shipping. In order to be portable across tiers and databases, JavaScript stored procedures need a standard database access API. Java 8 introduced the Nashorn JavaScript engine which allows JDBC calls in JavaScript. For cloud deployment, JavaScript stored procedures may be invoked through RESTful Web Services, turning these into cloud data services.

VTS is a series of interactive online events with hands-on sessions and presenters answering technical questions. The events are sponsored by the Oracle Technology Network (OTN). They are free events but you must register. Join the next exclusive events near you: 

  • Americas - September 16th- 9:30am to 12:30 PST - Register 
  • EMEA - September 23rd - 9:30am to 12:30pm BST - Register
  • APAC - September 30th- 3pm to 6:30pm AU/SYD - Register

Thursday Aug 27, 2015

Just-in-Time Compilation with JITWatch

Want to optimize the performance of your code? Ben Evans and Chris Newland wrap up their three-part series about using JITWatch to understand the just-in-time (JIT) compilation techniques used by the dynamic compiler in Oracle’s Java HotSpot VM. JITWatch is a free, open source tool developed by Newland that analyzes the complex compilation log file output generated by Java HotSpot VM. Among other things, it can help you visualize and understand the optimization decisions made by Java HotSpot VM.

Part 3 describes how to use JITWatch to see the effects that even small source code changes can have on Java HotSpot VM switches. Learn about Sandbox and VM switches features. Sandbox will let you edit code and then compile, execute, and analyze the Java HotSpot VM JIT logs. The VM switches are used to control JIT compilation.

In the September/October edition of Java Magazine Ben and Chris wrote part 2, which focuses on how to examine JIT logs to see what the JIT compiler is doing (and why). Part 1 provides a primer on JIT compilation.
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