Tuesday May 15, 2012

JSF 2.0 for the Cloud, Part Two

Part Two of Deepak Vohra’s “JSF 2.0 for the Cloud” is now up on otn/java. In Part One, Vohra demonstrated how to take advantage of resource handling, @ManagedBean annotation, and implicit navigation. In Part Two, he explores new features in JSF 2.0 that make it ready for the cloud, including Ajax support, view parameters, preemptive navigation, event handling, and bookmarkable URLs.

Ajax support for JSF 2.0 components includes asynchronous transfer of data between a client and a server, along with partial page rendering, partial page processing, and grouping of components, and can be added using either f:ajax tag or the JSF Ajax library (jsf.js).

Regarding view parameters, Vohra explains, “JSF 2.0 added support for view parameters, which add the provision to send request parameters in a GET request. A view parameter is a UI component represented with the UIViewParameter class. Just like other UI components, it is saved in the UI component tree for a Facelets page and can be associated with validators and converters. A view parameter is an EditableValueHolder because it implements the interface.”

Preemptive navigation allows developers to determine the resource file that they  navigate to and request parameters, if needed, based on the navigation case and view parameters, thus allowing them to create a URL for JSF resources that they access from a GET request. As a result, the URL displayed shows the resource and all request parameters.

Developers should take note that plans are in the works to update Java EE 7 for “cloud-related practical considerations, such as multitenancy and elasticity, also known as horizontal scaling.” This will be available through JSR 342, which is scheduled to complete an early draft review on May 23, 2012. Specification leads are Oracle’s Bill Shannon and Linda DeMichiel.
Access the article here.

Wednesday Nov 09, 2011

Working with the XML Parser API — JSR 172

Vikram Goyal’s article, “Working with the XML Parser API — JSR 172,” now up on otn/java, covers the basics of the XML Parsing API via a concrete example that uses SAX (Simple API for XML), a parsing method which is now preferred to the alternative method, and DOM (Document Object Model), which has a heavy memory footprint that led the XML Parser API to disallow its use in XML processing. “The XML Parser API,” explains Goyal, “defines the use of the SAX parser for parsing XML documents in resource-constrained devices.”

 

He explains through a working example what the SAX parser is, how it is defined by the API, and how best to use it.

 

From the article:

 

“In a nutshell, for the parsing of a custom XML document, you need to create a handler that extends the DefaultHandler class provided by the API. This custom handler is responsible for listening to the events from the parser and creating the model based on those events (and the supplied data). Your handler is responsible for validating the document and its data.”

 

Read the article.

 

Friday Nov 04, 2011

Adopt A JSR!

JUG Leaders have started an 'Adopt a JSR' program for Java User Groups! This program is intended to encourage JUG members to get involved in a Java Specification Request (JSR) and to evangelize that JSR to their JUG and the wider Java community, in order to increase grass roots participation.  JSRs cover all aspects of the Java ecosystem, such as the new Date and Time API coming into Java 8 and the latest JEE7 APIs for the cloud. Martjin Verburg, London Java Community(LJC) JUG Leader explained, "With JSR-348 bringing openness and transparency to the way in which JSRs are run, this is a great opportunity for everyone in the Java Community to help the Java ecosystem thrive."

The idea behind this program is to have a greater involvement of JUGs into the Java standards process so that:

  • Standards get earlier feedback, leading to more developer-friendly APIs
  • Standards get 'end user/developer' expert input
  • Standards get developed faster as the community helps with some of the heavy lifting
    of building Reference Implementations (RI) and Technical Compatibility Kits (TCK)
  • JUGs can help with the management of the open source projects that springs up
    around a JSR (managing mailing lists, triaging issues, etc.)

The benefits to JUGs and individual members adopting a JSR are obvious, hopefully. "It looks great on your our resume(CV), gives you new technical and community skills, and much more!" exclaimed Ben Evans, LJC Leader. Along those lines, Java Recruiter Barry Cranford wrote the blog "Give your career a boost by Adopting a JSR."

If you'd like to get your JUG involved, learn more about the Adopt a JSR program. Some JSRs have already been adopted, so please check the page so you can coordinate with other JUGs. Send comments or questions to the JUG Leaders list. Help adopt a JSR today. They need you!

Monday Oct 17, 2011

The Ninth Annual Java Community Process Program Awards

In a festive room full of Java luminaries and fine food at JavaOne 2011, the 9th annual JCP Program Awards were handed out Tuesday night at the Anzu Restaurant of the Nikko Hotel. The award categories were: JCP Member/Participant of the Year; Most Innovative JSR; and Outstanding Spec Lead.

The nominees in their respective categories were:

JCP Member/Participant of the Year

--Mike DeNicola, of Fujitsu, for his role as JCP.next Working Group Lead: While not officially Spec Lead of JSR 348, Mike has contributed a lot in getting the JCP reform plans where they are at a great pace, compared to earlier efforts. Helping the JCP to be fit for the next decades of Java following the Oracle-Sun merger.

--SouJava: For tirelessly promoting the JCP, JSRs, openness, transparency and our community at large (to say nothing of Bruno Souza's marvelous cape!).

--IBM: For their participation in the OpenJDK project, which has significantly increased the momentum of Java SE.   

--London Java Community: For their efforts to involve the developer community in the activities of the JCP.   

--Doug Lea: After a long and distinguished tenure on the JCP EC, Doug Lea (along with Tim Peierls and The Apache Software Foundation) felt he had no choice but to resign at the end of 2010. In doing so, he demonstrated integrity, independence, and courage that truly sets him apart. If the JCP is to retain any shred of legitimacy and relevance in the future, it will be through the actions other members who display the traits exemplified by Doug: integrity, independence, and courage, coupled with unparalleled technical expertise and a genuine love for the Java ecosystem.

Most Innovative JSR

--JSR 321: Trusted Computing API for Java. Beside a picture book example for Agile and Transparent Expert Group work, JSR 321 also anticipated another vision of JCP.next, by being the first JSR with a known implementation in a language other than Java, called Hybrid JSR by JCP.next (Part 2 and beyond). Apart from all that, Trusted Java holds the key to a safer more reliable and trusted usage of PaaS/Cloud or other Pervasive Technologies like Social Networking and Mobile.

--JSR 334: Small Enhancements to the Java Programming Language (Project Coin): Due to the process it was run under and the requirement of participants to 'put some skin in the game'.

--JSR 292:  Supporting Dynamically Typed Languages on the Java Platform: As the first JSR specifically designed to support languages other than Java, JSR 292 will ensure the long-term success of the Java VM.

Outstanding Spec Lead

--John Rose: (JSR 292 Supporting Dynamically Typed Languages on the Java Platform) Due to his excellence in ensuring consensus across the community -- both EG members and the wider JVM language community.

--Alex Buckley: (JSR 901, Java Language Specification and JSR 924: Java Virtual Machine Specification.) For his leadership.

--Mark Reinhold: For his leadership and promotion of the first Java SE platform JSR in several years.

The Winners

JCP Member/Participant of the Year: Mike DeNicola of Fujitsu

Most Innovative JSR: JSR 292, John Rose, Oracle, spec lead for JSR 292

Outstanding Spec Lead: John Rose, Oracle: JSR 292 Supporting Dynamically Typed Languages on the Java Platform


Community Leadership Award

Finally, the JCP Executive Committee gave a special Community Leadership Award to  Patrick Curran, Chair, Java Community Process, Oracle, who was recognized for the fabulous job he has done coping with a period of substantial change and conflict in the JCP over the past 18 months.

Obviously, the work of John Rose and his team was singularly honored. But as Rose himself graciously emphasized, it was itself a great honor to be counted among his fellow nominees.

Congratulations to all involved!

JCP.next, JSR 348 -- Towards a New Version of the Java Community Process

At JavaOne 2011, Tuesday's mid-day JCP discussion, presented by Heather VanCura, Oracle Manager, JCP Program, and Patrick Curran, Chair, Java Community Process, Oracle, explored some big news about the JCP. Oracle's commitment to greater transparency, participation, and openness is coming through loud and clear in JSR 348, "Towards a new version of the Java Community Process" -- otherwise known as JCP.next.

The main improvements, at this stage, involve gaining greater transparency by requiring, rather than suggesting, that all development is done on open mailing lists and issue trackers.  Furthermore, the recruiting process for Expert Group members will be publicly viewable, and ways to disclose TCK testing process results will be investigated - currently, the public is rarely aware of the results of the TCK testing process. All of these developments are designed to result in a more public, open, accessible and transparent JCP.

JSR 348 passed through a Pubic Review Ballot in mid-September with results for the SE/EE Executive Community showing 14 YES votes, one Abstain (Google) and one non-vote (VMWare). Oracle expects the initial version of JSR 348 to be concluded in October 2011, offering simple changes that will be quickly implemented. A subsequent second JSR, to be filed soon afterward, will tackle more complex issues, including any changes required to the Java Specification Participation Agreement (JSPA).

The JSPA is defined by the JCP as "a one-year, renewable agreement between you [[the participant in the agreement]] and Oracle America. It entitles you to review and comment on JSRs during the Community Review period - after they are initially approved by their sponsoring Expert Group and before they are open for Public Review. The agreement carries an annual fee, depending on your Member category."

The success of the Java community depends upon an open and transparent JCP, so JCP.next is worthy of our praise and attention.

Wednesday Jun 08, 2011

JCP.next Update

Did you know it takes a JSR to change the JCP process? JSR 348, titled "Towards a New Version of the Java Community Process," has been approved by both Executive Committees, who will now serve as the Expert Group for this JSR. The Early Draft Review is planned for early this (Northern Hemisphere) summer 2011.

JSR 348 focuses on changes to the JCP Process Document in the following areas:  transparency, participation, agility and governance. The JCP program office has posted a new article detailing plans for JSR 348 (AKA JCP.next). This article explains the background of the JSR, how to find the java.net project, and how to follow the workings of the JCP Executive Committee and how you can get involved. On the java.net project page you can find instructions for joining the Observer alias, a link to the discussion forum, a document archive and an (upcoming) issue tracker. Now is the time for community members to get involved!

Resources:

JCP Article: The JCP Program Moves Towards a New Version: JCP.next
JCP Program Office Blog: How to Participate in JCP.Next
JSR 348: Towards a New Version of the Java Community Process
JSR 348 Java.net Project Page



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