Monday Sep 23, 2013

More on the JavaOne 2013 Strategy Keynote - IBM's Java Focus

John Duimovich, Java CTO and IBM Distinguished Engineer, took the stage at Sunday’s JavaOne 2013 keynote and stated that IBM had a new approach to this year’s JavaOne. They arrived at JavaOne with 20 developers of all ranks, giving 28 sessions -- and only one marketing person. This was consistent with a mantra he repeated throughout his keynote: “It’s a great time to be a developer.” Duimovich also commented several times that developers ultimately have a lot of power, a recognition that leads IBM to shape many policies around the needs and desires of developers.

“With so many frameworks, languages and tools available, developers have all they need to create great applications,” he observed. “With the cloud and PaaS it is easy to go to market and, in fact, possible to take a good idea, test it, and deploy it within a day.” This, he insisted, has changed the landscape for developers. Since Java is the leading platform being used to deploy to the cloud, along with Javascript and HTML5, IBM will continue to follow and invest in developers.

Systems of Interaction and Engagement
Duimovich identified an interesting turn of events. “There is a new class of application development out there now called systems of interaction, which are typically delivered via the cloud." “Systems of interaction” is a term that encompasses what has traditionally been called systems of record, which are what many Java developers work with in Java EE using containers and databases in such domains as business process-oriented bank accounts and HR systems.

He observed that there are new and growing open cloud ecosystems centered around such platforms and projects as CloudFoundry and OpenStack, offering the next “big thing” for developers -- the ability to access a whole open stack and write applications. “What’s different about IBM is that we are investing in open things a bit earlier in their life cycle,” said Duimovich. “We don’t wait until they are done and competing with us. We try to influence them early.”

New applications are being developed that offer systems of interaction which he characterized as user-centric applications specifically targeted to support user work flow.  These are mobile apps similar to what is in a phone or a car that bridge both systems of record and social networks. “So the application might take Twitter or Facebook into account, while bridging big data and bring together capabilities that drive user-focused applications,” explained Duimovich. “You are on the way to the airport and the app tells you the plane is late; you take off and the app tells you about the weather in the city of arrival. After that, you might be interested in where to buy new clothes because your luggage is still at the airline.”

Such applications have contextual “awareness” driving them. All of this is driven by the cloud as systems of record get pushed out to the cloud as services. “IBM has created an experimental platform that developers can try out called IBM BlueMix which is based on OpenSource and CloudFoundry,” said Duimovich. “It has runtimes and frameworks, like Java, and new ones like Node, and other scripting languages like Ruby.”

IBM BlueMix offers standard services such as database, caching, and messaging, but also includes new ones like social information, and location and geo-spatial database information. “This is all brought together so the enterprise can engage with their customers in a much richer way -- the way they do that is via the cloud.”

Java Innovation at IBM
He discussed the IBM WebSphere Liberty Buildpack, which is freely available for developers. It can be downloaded and pushed to any Cloud Foundry-based system. “This is our first step in making Java to PaaS deployment as easy as possible for developers.” Liberty is a Java profile that supports Java EE and is a container offering lots of features for clouds.

IBM has also been working on a multi-tenancy JVM, which means the VM can run and stack more VMs inside of it to save space and enable faster startup performance. This allows developers to manage life cycles independently. It’s intended for those who want to get more dense and efficient deployment on the cloud. “Just as peanut butter and chocolate go together – Liberty and multi-tenancy VMs are delicious,” said Duimovich.

He explained that running the Liberty profile and on the multi-tenancy JDK results in 2-3 times faster startup and twice as much density, so developers can stack twice as many instances on a machine than before without loss of performance.

Duimovich closed with some remarks about hardware innovation at IBM, and where the Java language may be headed in the future.

IBM BlueMix

IBM WebSphere Liberty Buildpack

Watch Keynote and Session Highlights on Demand

Friday Sep 21, 2012

JavaOne 2012 Conference Preview

A new article, by noted freelancer Steve Meloan, now up on otn/java, titled “JavaOne 2012 Conference Preview,” looks ahead to the fast approaching JavaOne 2012 Conference, scheduled for September 30-October 4 in San Francisco. The Conference will celebrate and highlight one of the world’s leading technologies. As Meloan states, “With 9 million Java developers worldwide, 5 billion Java cards in use, 3 billion mobile phones running Java, 1 billion Java downloads each year, and 100 percent of Blu-ray disk players and 97 percent of enterprise desktops running Java, Java is a technology that literally permeates our world.”

The 2012 JavaOne is organized under seven technical tracks:

* Core Java Platform
* Development Tools and Techniques
* Emerging Languages on the JVM
* Enterprise Service Architectures and the Cloud
* Java EE Web Profile and Platform Technologies
* Java ME, Java Card, Embedded, and Devices
* JavaFX and Rich User Experiences

Conference keynotes will lay out the Java roadmap. For the Sunday keynote, such Oracle luminaries as Cameron Purdy, Vice President of Development; Nandini Ramani, Vice President of Engineering, Java Client and Mobile Platforms; Richard Bair, Chief Architect, Client Java Platform; and Mark Reinhold, Chief Architect, Java Platform will be presenting.

For the Thursday IBM keynote, Jason McGee, Distinguished Engineer and Chief Architect for IBM PureApplication System, and John Duimovich, Java CTO and IBM Distinguished Engineer, will explore Java and IBM's cloud-based initiatives.
All in all, the JavaOne 2012 Conference should be as exciting as ever.

Link to the article here.

Originally published on blogs.oracle.com/javaone.

Monday Oct 17, 2011

Java Community Keynote: Enabling Collaboration, Enabling Innovation

IBM, Java, and the Cloud

The morning JavaOne 2011 Community Keynote began with IBM, presented by Jason McGee, IBM Distinguished Engineer, Chief Architect, Cloud Computing. McGee focused on Java and Cloud computing-the challenges in the language and the JVM for running in the Cloud, how to make your applications elastic and scale well in the Cloud, and the latest innovations (driven by IBM and others) for deploying applications to the Cloud.

McGee explored several recent IBM offerings for the Cloud-including WebSphere eXtreme Scale, a Java based, in-memory data grid product for elastic scalability in Cloud environments; and IBM Workload Deployer, a Cloud deployment and management system for existing virtualized hardware. McGee ended by reiterating IBM's commitment to the Java community, noting their membership in OpenJDK as of 2010.

Community: Best Practices, Innovation, and Learning Resources

Sharat Chander, Principle Product Director, JavaOne Program Committee Chairperson, Oracle began his portion of the keynote by offering a moment of silence in respect for the passing of Apple's Steve Jobs, noting his passion and innovation in the world of technology. The Apple logo briefly appeared on the large screen.

Chander emphasized that Java isn't just about technology, it's also about community. Within this context, he first recognized Mike DeNicola, John Rose, and Patrick Curran, for their outstanding participation and leadership within the JCP this past year. And as part of ever-broadening the Java community, Chander next paid tribute to the Java Dutchess program-with over 400 groups around the world, globally connecting women in Java technology.

From there, Donald Smith, Director of Product Management, Java Platform Group, Oracle invited onstage a panel of representatives from the global Java community: Martijn Verburg, London Java Community; John Duimovich, OpenJDK; Deepak Bhole, OpenJDK; Stephen Chin, SvJugFx; and Bruno Souza, SouJava. The group noted that this was the first JavaOne conference with a community-themed keynote. In true connected community fashion, the group invited those watching the presentation to informally vote (via text message) on Java technologies and initiatives of current and future interest.

The panel members all urged active participation in Java User Groups, from both a technical and professional advancement perspective. Such community involvement not only drives open standards, they declared, but also drives innovation among vendors. The OpenJDK representatives then explored the challenges and promises of the initiative, agreeing that participants should have high expectations for openness, and to push on that. They strongly urged developers to download OpenJDK, and to use it.

Community: Moving Java Forward

Smith explored with the panel how the Java community can best take part in moving Java forward. The consensus was that the process ideally involves vision, innovation, and execution, and that the community can participate at all of these levels-getting involved via JUGs, as well as testing and submitting bug reports, and thereby helping Oracle and other Java vendors build the best and most innovative technologies. One technique being explored at some JUGs, to better facilitate participation, is to both stream them live and offer audio archives via Parleys.com. Within the context of making community content as available as possible, Oracle announced their agreement with Parleys.com to host many of the JavaOne sessions on the learning site-including video, demos, and synchronized audio/slides.

Duke's Choice Award Winners

What JavaOne would be complete without acknowledging the Duke's Choice Award Winners (this year with community input in the selection and review process). Featured onstage were representatives of Rockwell Automation, for their Java Embedded factory floor automation solutions; Sodbeans Project, for their NetBeans-based accessibility suite to aid blind software developers; and JHome, a Glassfish/Java EE-based home automation system for the control of almost any device in the home, including lamps, gates, coffee machines, and more.
Java Posse Comes to Town

To the tune of Spaghetti Western soundtrack music, representatives of the fabled Java Posse next took the stage (to Sharat Chander's mock amazement). The Java Posse site has long been known for its podcasts offering news, discussions, interviews, and "general mayhem" surrounding the world of Java. The Java Posse members emphasized what they see as the three elements of Java-the language, the platform, and (most importantly), the Java community. "We have a development community that other development platforms dream of having," they said. They promised in-depth appearances from many of the Duke's Choice Award winners. And in parting the stage, they deputized Chander as an official honorary member of the Java Posse, presenting him with a 10-gallon hat.

In closing, JavaOne participants were urged to get involved and make their voices heard-to participate in the JavaOne Community Steering Committee, to participate in the JavaOne Program Committee, to submit speaker papers, to participate in the OpenJDK project, and to join a local JUG. Chander parted by noting that JavaOne 2012 would feature a community member as one of the keynote speakers.



Learn More:

WebSphere eXtreme Scale
IBM Workload Deployer
Java Dutchess
2011 Duke's Choice Award Winners
Parleys.com
The Java Posse

The Ninth Annual Java Community Process Program Awards

In a festive room full of Java luminaries and fine food at JavaOne 2011, the 9th annual JCP Program Awards were handed out Tuesday night at the Anzu Restaurant of the Nikko Hotel. The award categories were: JCP Member/Participant of the Year; Most Innovative JSR; and Outstanding Spec Lead.

The nominees in their respective categories were:

JCP Member/Participant of the Year

--Mike DeNicola, of Fujitsu, for his role as JCP.next Working Group Lead: While not officially Spec Lead of JSR 348, Mike has contributed a lot in getting the JCP reform plans where they are at a great pace, compared to earlier efforts. Helping the JCP to be fit for the next decades of Java following the Oracle-Sun merger.

--SouJava: For tirelessly promoting the JCP, JSRs, openness, transparency and our community at large (to say nothing of Bruno Souza's marvelous cape!).

--IBM: For their participation in the OpenJDK project, which has significantly increased the momentum of Java SE.   

--London Java Community: For their efforts to involve the developer community in the activities of the JCP.   

--Doug Lea: After a long and distinguished tenure on the JCP EC, Doug Lea (along with Tim Peierls and The Apache Software Foundation) felt he had no choice but to resign at the end of 2010. In doing so, he demonstrated integrity, independence, and courage that truly sets him apart. If the JCP is to retain any shred of legitimacy and relevance in the future, it will be through the actions other members who display the traits exemplified by Doug: integrity, independence, and courage, coupled with unparalleled technical expertise and a genuine love for the Java ecosystem.

Most Innovative JSR

--JSR 321: Trusted Computing API for Java. Beside a picture book example for Agile and Transparent Expert Group work, JSR 321 also anticipated another vision of JCP.next, by being the first JSR with a known implementation in a language other than Java, called Hybrid JSR by JCP.next (Part 2 and beyond). Apart from all that, Trusted Java holds the key to a safer more reliable and trusted usage of PaaS/Cloud or other Pervasive Technologies like Social Networking and Mobile.

--JSR 334: Small Enhancements to the Java Programming Language (Project Coin): Due to the process it was run under and the requirement of participants to 'put some skin in the game'.

--JSR 292:  Supporting Dynamically Typed Languages on the Java Platform: As the first JSR specifically designed to support languages other than Java, JSR 292 will ensure the long-term success of the Java VM.

Outstanding Spec Lead

--John Rose: (JSR 292 Supporting Dynamically Typed Languages on the Java Platform) Due to his excellence in ensuring consensus across the community -- both EG members and the wider JVM language community.

--Alex Buckley: (JSR 901, Java Language Specification and JSR 924: Java Virtual Machine Specification.) For his leadership.

--Mark Reinhold: For his leadership and promotion of the first Java SE platform JSR in several years.

The Winners

JCP Member/Participant of the Year: Mike DeNicola of Fujitsu

Most Innovative JSR: JSR 292, John Rose, Oracle, spec lead for JSR 292

Outstanding Spec Lead: John Rose, Oracle: JSR 292 Supporting Dynamically Typed Languages on the Java Platform


Community Leadership Award

Finally, the JCP Executive Committee gave a special Community Leadership Award to  Patrick Curran, Chair, Java Community Process, Oracle, who was recognized for the fabulous job he has done coping with a period of substantial change and conflict in the JCP over the past 18 months.

Obviously, the work of John Rose and his team was singularly honored. But as Rose himself graciously emphasized, it was itself a great honor to be counted among his fellow nominees.

Congratulations to all involved!

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