Tuesday Sep 17, 2013

A Conversation with Java Champion Johan Vos

A new interview is now up on otn/java. In it, Johan Vos, a highly regarded Java Champion whose focus is on combining the strengths of back-end systems and embedded devices, provides his insightful take on what’s happening in the world of Java technology. His favorite technologies are currently Java EE/Glassfish at the backend and JavaFX at the front-end. He is a co-author of Pro JavaFX 2, and will be offering two sessions at JavaOne 2013.  

In the interview, Vos summarizes his sessions:

“In ‘Building Social Software on Top of Java EE 7 with DaliCore,’ I’ll show how you can integrate social software functionality into Java EE 7 applications. Many enterprise applications can benefit from some kinds of integration with e.g., Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, etc., without jeopardizing the user’s privacy and without giving up ownership of the data. The DaliCore framework adds the concept of User and OnlineAccount to the Java EE world, and provides the coupling with existing social networks. This saves lots of project-specific boilerplate code. This approach works both in web-applications as well as in desktop applications.

In ‘DataFX: The Best Way to Get Real-World Data into Your JavaFX Application,’ Hendrik Ebbers and I will present DataFX 2, a framework that helps JavaFX developers to populate JavaFX controls with real-world data. Now that JavaFX is beyond the stage of demos and POCs, it becomes important that the fake data used in demos be replaced with real data, often coming from back-end servers and databases. Apart from the regular cases where a JDBC source or a RESTful web service is queried, we will also show how changes in the local data can be propagated to the backend again...”

In discussing his efforts to combine Java EE and JavaFX, Vos remarks: “I am convinced that these two technologies are complementary, and while they are completely decoupled, the combination of them can lead to great end-to-end projects. As a POC, and in order to get more realistic use cases that could benefit both DaliCore and DataFX, I started to write a JavaFX application that offers community functionality. The front-end of that application is written in JavaFX, and the back-end is using DaliCore on top of Java EE 7. In this application, lots of data is sent from and to the back-end.”

In addition, Vos discusses his experiences with Java EE 7 and Java SE 8, the revolution that lambda expressions bring to Java, the client aspect of Java, how JavaFX fits into Java SE 8, and much more.

Check out the interview here.

Wednesday Feb 15, 2012

GlassFish Adds Agility to Java EE Deployment

A new article by Julien Ponge on the front page of otn/java, titled “Adding Some Agility to Java EE Application Deployment with GlassFish,” reports on four noteworthy features in GlassFish that increase agility to Java EE application deployment.

* Session data preservation across redeployments

* Servlet fragments

* Application-scoped resources

* Application versioning

The article relies on a running example called TaskEE, a simple task list application that functions as a deployable application in which tasks are stored in a volatile Web session. Ponge shows how to morph TaskEE into TaskEEPA in order to store tasks in a relational database rather than a Web session.

Directly from the article:
“Deploying and managing Java Platform, Enterprise Edition (Java EE) applications seems like a fairly established activity. Applications can be deployed, undeployed, and upgraded through a combination of deployment and undeployment. Applications use various types of resources, such as JDBC connection pools or Java Message Service (JMS) destinations. Such resources need to be created, configured, and administered using an application server means, such as configuration files, command-line tools, and graphical interfaces. While the tasks do not vary much from one Java EE application server to another, each one is free to provide a broader set of features that make the developer’s and the infrastructure team’s jobs more enjoyable.”

Read the complete article here.

Monday Jan 09, 2012

Interfaces on Demand with CDI and EJB 3.1

A new article by Java Champion Adam Bien, up on otn/java, “Interfaces on Demand with CDI and EJB 3.1” explains that since Java EE 6, interfaces are no longer required by the container in order to realize common use cases, thus enabling developers to use them more consciously and strategically for the realization of business logic. Bien shows how interfaces can now be used as vehicles for encapsulation or abstraction, as they were originally intended.

From the article:

“There is nothing wrong with the abstraction of every implementation with an interface if such an approach can be clearly justified, but interfaces become dubious when you have to introduce artificial naming conventions to avoid name clashes…
Interfaces should be introduced only as a contract for already existing classes, for the realization of Strategy or Bridge patterns, or when you need to design an API, such as Java Database Connectivity (JDBC), Java Message Service (JMS), and so on. In typical business applications, this occurs in only a fraction of all cases.”
Read the complete article here.


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