Wednesday Mar 30, 2016

Last Interactive Online Java Webinar with Q&A

The Virtual Technology Summit (VTS) delivers interactive Java technical content from Java Champions and Oracle experts to your desk.  

The interactive, online event, is sponsored by the Oracle Technology Network (OTN). The April 5 event is the last one in this VTS series. It features six Java technical sessions about Java EE, cloud, and Java SE API. Register now

The Java Track includes three code-heavy sessions:

Java on Mobile: Thanks to innovations in mobile JVM's and the availability of JavaFX on iOS and Android, it is now possible to write applications once (in Java) and deploy them on the major mobile platforms. In this session, we will show how easy it is to create a highly-polished Material Design Java application, and to deploy it on an Android device and an iOS device with exactly the same code used in both deployments.

Asynchronous programming in Java 8: how to use CompletableFuture: This presentation aims to explain how the patterns introduced by this interface and its implementing class are new to the Java platform, and how they fill the gap in the old Future patterns.The different models are precisely presented: how to create complex asynchronous processing pipelines, how to deal with exceptions, how to test complex code. 

Down-to-Earth Microservices with Java EE: the session explores microservices using a simple but representative example using Java EE. You'll see how the Java EE programming model and APIs like JAX-RS, WebSocket, JSON-P, Bean Validation, CDI, JPA, EJB 3, JMS 2 and JTA aligns with the concept of microservices.

Java SE 8 for Java EE Developers: Java SE 8 brings a bounty of improvements. In this session, you will learn about Lambda expressions, a new Date and Time API, the Streams API, Completable Futures, Nashorn, Repeatable Annotations, String joiners, etc.

Thinking Beyond ORM in JPA:  This session discusses native-query support in JPA along with stored procedures and result set mappings in JPA 2.1. The presented code samples illustrate the details of the API, highlighting their strengths and weaknesses. Our analysis reveals applicable use cases and most popular approaches. The summary provides guidelines on how and when to utilize native queries.

Visualizing Data in the Cloud with Oracle JET: Oracle JET is a free and open source toolkit, providing a solid basis for enterprise JavaScript applications, including built-in solutions for accessibility, modularity, and data visualization. In this code-driven session, you will learn everything you need to know to create maintainable enterprise applications in JavaScript!

Tuesday Mar 15, 2016

JAX-RS and Hypermedia

How to build a Hypermedia-Driven RESTful Web Service. Sebastian Daschner describes different approaches to realize RESTful services with JavaEE 7 and JAX-RS. Watch his presentation as he shows best practices and different frameworks that accelerate your development.

Wednesday Mar 02, 2016

NightHacking Tour of Germany

Java Community Lead Stephen Chin and Freelancer Sebastian Daschner are touring Java User Groups in Germany. And, you can watch them live at NightHacking during JavaLand. 

In his presentation, Stephen will walk you through how to build your own retro handheld console that is powered by Java, runs on a Raspberry Pi, and is printed on a 3D printer. Some of the topics that he will cover along the journey include: hacking Java on the Raspberry Pi
, rigging input devices with Pi4J, Insane performance tuning on the JVM
, why your boss [or SO] needs to buy you a 3D printer!
 And of course your retro gaming mettle will be put to the test, so make sure to dust off your old 8 and 16 bit consoles to prepare. This presentation is about the most fun you can have while still legitimately calling this conference “work.” 

Sebastian will give an introduction of RESTful web services with Hypermedia as the engine of application state, what the benefits and costs of using this approach are and show different approaches how to realize such REST services with JavaEE 7 and JAX-RS. Most of the time will be spend demonstrating different implementations (plain JavaEE 7, existing libraries, etc.) with live coding. The session is held in English. 

Agenda

3/3/16    JUG Berlin
3/4/16    JUG Hannover
3/5/16    JUG Münster
3/6/16    JUG Dortmund
3/8/16    JavaLand
3/9/16    JavaLand
3/10/16  JUG Darmstadt
3/14/16  JUG Bodensee



Thursday Feb 18, 2016

Writing Web Apps

By Java Magazine Editor Andrew Binstock

Welcome to the January/February issue of Java Magazine whose focus is on developing Web applications. Not so long ago, this topic would require us to cover and compare innumerable Java frameworks. But as Web apps have turned increasingly to microservices in their architecture and REST for their APIs, the need for heavyweight frameworks has decreased significantly. By and large, Spring remains the principal widely used framework. And so, we cover its latest incarnation, Spring Boot, in a lengthy tutorial, which highlights how easy it makes creating Web apps. 

A companion examination of the JAX-RS library, with emphasis on lesser used capabilities that you might not realize it offers, is also included. And for readers who use some form of xFaces for the Web part of the app, we dig into OmniFaces, a well-designed utility library that integrates easily with JSF, MyFaces, PrimeFaces, RichFaces, etc.

[Read More]

Tuesday Feb 16, 2016

Down to Earth Microservices and Java EE!

Not sure whether microservices make sense for your project? Will a microservices architecture improve the performance and scalability of your project? In the Down to Earth Microservices with Java EE session, Reza Rahman looks beyond the buzz and gives you a concrete approach to microservices that will help you think about how to implement them.   

Reza will explain the ins-and-outs of microservices within the well-established context of SOA and takes a close look at when it makes sense to implement them. He will walk you through an example showing how to use the lightweight Java EE programming model with Java EE. The Java EE programming model and APIs are aligned with microservices. You’ll learn how APIs such as JAX-RS, WebSocket, JSON-P, Bean Validation, CDI, JPA, EJB 3, JMS 2, and JTA can help you build microservices. The microservices architecture style fits well within the Java EE framework and taps into Java knowledge that you currently have.  

This presentation is part of the next Virtual Technology Summit sponsored by the Oracle Technology Network. Register, it's free! For your convenience, we offer the event in three time zones as follows: 
  • Americas - March 8th- 9:30am to 1:00 PST - Register
  • APAC - March 15th - 9:30am to 1:00pm IST - Register
  • EMEA - April 5th - 9:30am to 1:00pm BST - Register
This VTS provides two tracks on Java SE and Java EE with six hands-on sessions. Check out the full VTS agenda here

Tuesday Jul 14, 2015

Develop Non-Blocking Web Applications in Java

As Re Lai explains in this article, web applications have traditionally processed requests synchronously on the server side. Asynchronous programming is generally used on the client side. However, due to the advent of social networking, mobile devices, and the Internet of Things, non-blocking request processing on the server side has taken off as an important technique for meeting ever-more-daunting performance demands.

Lai's article explores the asynchronous support provided in several popular web frameworks--Servlet, JAX-RS, Spring MVC, Vert.x, and the Play Framework--for implementing non-blocking server-side request processing. He also discusses a sample application, todosapp, to show how to implement non-blocking web applications in these frameworks. Read Lai's article

Tuesday Sep 09, 2014

GlassFish Server Open Source Edition 4.1 Released!

Thursday Sep 26, 2013

Session Report: 50 New Features of Java EE 7 in 50 minutes

 by Timothy Beneke

On Tuesday afternoon, noted Java EE authors Arun Gupta and Antonio Goncalves offered a whirlwind tour of new features in “Java EE 7: Fifty New Features of Java EE 7 in 50 Minutes”. Gupta is legendary at Oracle for his hard work and astute grasp of the Java EE platform. His blog offers a wealth of insight into Java EE and other Java matters. He is the author, most recently, of Java EE 7 Essentials published by O’Reilly. Goncalves is one of the most highly regarded writers on EE anywhere and the author of Beginning Java EE 7, published by Apress.

Java EE 7’s new features enhance HTML5 support, increase developer productivity, and further improve how enterprise demands can be met. Developers will write significantly less boilerplate code, have better support for the latest Web applications, and gain access to enhanced scalability and richer, simpler functionality. The session did a stellar job of spelling out the details to a packed house.

With four new components (WebSocket, JSON-P, batch, and concurrency), and three old ones significantly updated (JAX-RS, JMS, and EL), along with other significant changes to the platform, a lot of new functionality has been added.

They divided the new Java EE 7 features into 19 categories and explained an average of two to three features in each category.  Here were the categories:

CDI 1.1 (JSR 346)
Bean Validation 1.1 (JSR 349)
Interceptors 1.2 (JSR 318)
Concurrency utilities 1.0 (JSR 236)
JPA 2.1 (JSR 338)
JTA 1.2 (JSR 907)
EJB 3.2 (JSR 345)
JMS 2.0 (JSR 343)
Servlet 3.1 (JSR 340)
Web Socket 1.0 (JSR 356)
Expression Language 3.0 (JSR 341)
JSF 2.2 (JSR 344)
JAX-RS 2.0 (JSR 339)
JSON-P 1.0 (JSR 353)
Batch 1.0 (JSR 352)
JavaMail 1.5 (JSR 919)
JCA 1.7 (JSR 322)
Java Connector Architecture
Default Resources

Here are just a few of the high points:

CDI 1.1 (JSR 346) enables finer scanning control and the ability to veto the processing of a class or package. Bean Validation 1.1 (JSR 349) allows for method validation and the ability to pre/post conditions on method and constructors. Interceptors 1.2 (JSR 318) focused on the ability to associate an Interceptor associated with a constructor and the ability to prioritize interceptor bindings.

For Concurrency utilities 1.0 (JSR 236), the emphasis was on ManagedExecutor with a focus on:
* User threads in Java EE applications
* The ability to support simple and advance concurrency design patterns
* And to extend Concurrency Utilities API from Java SE (JSR 166y)

Further emphasis in concurrency was on ManagedThreadFactory and DynamicProxy.

Dynamic Proxy:
* Creates dynamic proxy objects, and adds contextual information available for applications running in Java EE environment
* It supports Classloading, JNDI, Security, …

Also covered as part of concurrency: ManagedExecutor
* User threads in Java EE applications
* Support simple and advance concurrency design patterns
* Extend Concurrency Utilities API from Java SE (JSR 166y)
– java.util.concurrent package

In addition: ManagedScheduledExecutor
* Managed version of ScheduledExecutorService
* Submit delayed or periodic tasks

For JPA 2.1 (JSR 338), standardized database schema generation and the ability to define additional indexes in schema generation were emphasized. JTA 1.2 (JSR 907) was praised for its capacity for transaction management on Managed Beans as a CDI interceptor binding; in addition, it offers CDI scope whose lifecycle is scoped to the currently active JTA transaction.

They discussed WebSocket and annotated server endpoint which enables full-duplex bi-directional communication over a single TCP connection.

JSON Builder creates an object model (or an array) in memory by adding elements. JsonParser is an event-based parser that can read JSON data from a stream.

All in all, it was an impressive display of Java SE 7 expertise.

Java EE 7 Essentials by Arun Gupta

Beginning Java EE 7 by Antonio Goncalves

Be sure to check out Parleys.com in early October to listen to the entire session. It's well worth it.

Friday Jul 19, 2013

Java API for JSON Processing: An Introduction to JSON

A new article, now up on otn/java, by Oracle’s Jitandra Kotamraju, titled “Java API for JSON Processing: An Introduction to JSON,” takes a look at how Java API for JSON Processing provides portable APIs to parse, generate, transform and query JSON, also known as JavaScript Object Notation. Kotamraju, a principal member of the technical staff at Oracle, is the JSON Processing specification lead.

JSO, a lightweight, text-based, language-independent data exchange format that is easy to read and write by both humans and machines, can represent two structured types: objects and arrays. Kotamraju, the JSON Processing specification lead, explains that “an object is an unordered collection of zero or more name/value pairs. An array is an ordered sequence of zero or more values. The values can be strings, numbers, booleans, null and these two structured types.”

JSON is frequently used in Ajax applications, configurations, databases, and RESTful web services. JSON is offered as the data exchange format with their RESTful web services by all popular websites.

Kotamraju gets under the hood with both the object model and streaming APIs. He concludes that the API for JSON Processing offers the following capabilities:
* “Parsing input streams into immutable objects or event streams
* Writing event streams or immutable objects to output streams
* Programmatically navigating immutable objects
* Programmatically building immutable objects with builders”

The API forms a base for building data binding, transformation, querying, or other manipulation APIs. JAX-RS 2.0 provides native integration for the Java API for JSON Processing.

Check out the article here.

Monday Apr 08, 2013

Technical Article: Java EE 7 and JAX-RS 2.0

A new article by Java Champion Adam Bien, titled “Java EE 7 and JAX-RS 2.0” is up on otn/java. The article demonstrates how Java EE 7 with JAX-RS 2.0 has several new useful features which further simplify development, and lead to the creation of more sophisticated Java SE/EE RESTful applications.

Using a Java-friendly, but simplistic JAX-RS 2.0 example Bien takes the reader through aspects, request interception, client and configuration issues and much more. He concludes the article as follows:

“Interestingly, JAX-RS does not even require a full-fledged application server. After fulfilling the specified Context Types, a JAX-RS 2.0–compliant API can be anything. However, the combination with EJB 3.2 brings asynchronous processing, pooling (and so throttling), and monitoring. Tight integration with Servlet 3+ comes with efficient asynchronous processing of @Suspended responses through AsyncContext support and CDI runtime brings eventing. Also Bean Validation is well integrated and can be used for validation of resource parameters. Using JAX-RS 2.0 together with other Java EE 7 APIs brings the most convenient (=no configuration) and most productive (=no re-invention) way of exposing objects to remote systems.”

Check out the article here.

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