Thursday Apr 25, 2013

JavaOne India: Hear about Java from the Source!

JavaOne India
May 8-9, 2013,
Hyderabad International Convention Center

Java Strategy and Technical Keynotes 

Technical Sessions, In addition to Technical Sessions, Hands On Labs and an OTN VIP room with community sessions, and the Java Demogrounds, JavaOne India will include keynotes from the people who develop and drive the Java language and platform. You can hear from them, meet them, and ask your questions directly (you can tweet them during the keynote!).  In these keynotes, Oracle’s Java engineering luminaries will provide a glimpse of the future:

Java Strategy Keynote Speakers
Anil Gaur, Vice President of Server Technologies, Oracle
Nandini Ramani, Vice President of Engineering, Java Client and Mobile Platforms, Oracle
Georges Saab, Vice President of Development, Oracle
Sharat Chander, Group Director, Product Technology Outreach, Oracle

Java Technical Keynote Speakers
Angela Caicedo, Senior Member of Technical Staff, Oracle
Stephen Chin, Java Technology Ambassador and JavaOne Content Chair, Oracle
Arun Gupta, Java EE Technology Evangelist, Oracle
Simon Ritter, Java Technology Evangelist, Oracle
Jim Weaver, Consulting Member of Technical Staff, Oracle

What more could you ask? How about a savings of INR 1,400 on Registration Through 7 May 2013! Register now for JavaOne India, and you can acquire new skills, network with colleagues, and reconnect with your passion for Java.

Thursday Dec 06, 2012

JavaOne Latin America Opening Keynotes

Originally published on blogs.oracle.com/javaone

It was a great first day at JavaOne Brazil, which included the Java Strategy and Java Technical keynotes. Henrik Stahl, Senior Director, Product Management for Java opened the keynotes by saying that this is the third year for JavaOne Latin America. He explained, "You know what they say, the first time doesn't count, the second time is a habit and the third time it's a tradition!" He mentioned that he was thrilled that this is largest JavaOne in Brazil to date, and he wants next year to be larger. He said that Oracle knows Latin America is an important hub for development.  "We continually come back to Latin America because of the dedication the community has with driving the continued innovation for Java," he said. Stahl explained that Oracle and the Java community must continue to innovate and Make the Future Java together. The success of Java depends on three important factors: technological innovation, Oracle as a strong steward of Java, and community participation. "The Latin American Java Community (especially in Brazil) is a shining example of how to be positive contributor to Java," Stahl said.

Next, George Saab, VP software dev, Java Platform Group at Oracle, discussed some of the recent and upcoming changes to Java. "In addition to the incremental improvements to Java 7, we have also increased the set of platforms supported by Oracle from Linux, Windows, and Solaris to now also include Mac OS X and Linux/ARM for ARM-based PCs such as the Raspberry Pi and emerging ARM based microservers."  Saab announced that EA builds for Linux ARM Hard Float ABI will be available by the end of the year. 

Staffan Friberg, Product Manager, Java Platform Group, provided an overview of some of the language coming in Java 8, including Lambda, remove of PermGen, improved data and time APIs and improved security, Java 8 development is moving along. He reminded the audience that they can go to OpenJDK to see this development being done in real-time, and that there are weekly early access builds of OracleJDK 8 that developers can download and try today.

Judson Althoff, Senior Vice President, Worldwide Alliances and Channels and Embedded Sales, was invited to the stage, and the audience was told that "even though he is wearing a suit, he is still pretty technical." Althoff started off with a bang: "The Internet of Things is on a collision course with big data and this is a huge opportunity for developers."  For example, Althoff said, today cars are more a data device than a mechanical device. A car embedded with sensors for fuel efficiency, temperature, tire pressure, etc. can generate a petabyte of data A DAY. There are similar examples in healthcare (patient monitoring and privacy requirements creates a complex data problem) and transportation management (sending a package around the world with sensors for humidity, temperature and light). Althoff then brought on stage representatives from three companies that are successful with Java today, first Axel Hansmann, VP Strategy & Marketing Communications, Cinterion. Mr. Hansmann explained that Cinterion, a market leader in Latin America, enables M2M services with Java. At JavaOne San Francisco, Cinterion launched the EHS5, the smallest 3g solderable module, with Java installed on it. This provides Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) with a cost effective, flexible platform for bringing advanced M2M technology to market.

Next, Steve Nelson, Director of Marketing for the Americas, at Freescale explained that Freescale is #1 in Embedded Processors in Wired and Wireless Communications, and #1 in Automotive Semiconductors in the Americas. He said that Java provides a mature, proven platform that is uniquely suited to meet the requirements of almost any type of embedded device. He encouraged University students to get involved in the Freescale Cup, a global competition where student teams build, program, and race a model car around a track for speed.

Roberto Franco, SBTVD Forum President, SBTVD, talked about Ginga, a Java-based standard for television in Brazil. He said there are 4 million Ginga TV sets in Brazil, and they expect over 20 million TV sets to be sold by the end of 2014. Ginga is also being adopted in other 11 countries in Latin America. Ginga brings interactive services not only at TV set, but also on other devices such as tablets,  PCs or smartphones, as the main or second screen. "Interactive services is already a reality," he said, ' but in a near future, we foresee interactivity enhanced TV content, convergence with OTT services and a big participation from the audience,  all integrated on TV, tablets, smartphones and second screen devices."

Before he left the stage, Nandini Ramani thanked Judson for being part of the Java community and invited him to the next Geek Bike Ride in Brazil. She presented him an official geek bike ride jersey.

For the Technical Keynote, a "blue screen of death" appeared. With mock concern, Stephin Chin asked the rest of the presenters if they could go on without slides. What followed was a interesting collection of demos, including JavaFX on a tablet, a look at Project Easel in NetBeans, and even Simon Ritter controlling legos with his brainwaves!

Stay tuned for more dispatches.

Friday Oct 19, 2012

An Interview with JavaOne Rock Star Martijn Verburg

An interview with JavaOne Rock Star Martijn Verburg, by yours truly, titled “Challenging the Diabolical Developer: A Conversation with JavaOne Rock Star Martijn Verburg,” is now up on otn/java. Verburg, one of the leading movers and shakers in the Java community, is well known for his ‘diabolical developer” talks at JavaOne where he uncovers some of the worst practices that Java developers are prone to.

He mentions a few in the interview:

* “A lack of communication: Software development is far more a social activity than a technical one; most projects fail because of communication issues and social dynamics, not because of a bad technical decision. Sadly, many developers never learn this lesson.
* No source control: Some developers simply store code in local file systems and e-mail the code in order to integrate their changes; yes, this still happens.
* Design-driven design: Some developers are inclined to cram every design pattern from the Gang of Four (GoF) book into their projects. Of course, by that stage, they've actually forgotten why they're building the software in the first place.”

He points to a couple of core assumptions and confusions that lead to trouble:

“One is that developers think that the JVM is a magic box that will clean up their memory and make their code run fast, as well as make them cups of coffee. The JVM does help in a lot of cases, but bad code can and will still lead to terrible results!

The other trend is to try to force Java (the language) to do something it's not very good at, such as rapid Web development. So you get a proliferation of overly complex frameworks, libraries, and techniques trying to get around the fact that Java is a monolithic, statically typed, compiled, OO environment. It's not a Golden Hammer!”

Verburg has many insightful things to say about how to keep a Java User Group (JUG) going, about the “Adopt a JSR” program, bugathons, and much more.

Check out the article here.

Friday Oct 12, 2012

JavaOne 2012 in Review

Noted freelance writer Steve Meloan has a new article up on otn/java, titled, “JavaOne 2012 Review: Make the Future Java” in which he summarizes the happenings at JavaOne 2012.

Along the way, he reminds us that if the future turns out to be anything like the past, Java will do fine:

The repeated theme for this year's conference was ‘Make the Future Java,’ and according to recent stats, the groundwork is already firmly in place:

    There are 9 million Java developers worldwide.
    Three billion devices run Java.
    Five billion Java Cards are in use.
    One hundred percent of Blu-ray Disc players ship with Java.
    Ninety-seven percent of enterprise desktops run Java.
    Eighty-nine percent of PC desktops run Java.

This year's content curriculum program was organized under seven technical tracks:

    Core Java Platform
    Development Tools and Techniques
    Emerging Languages on the JVM
    Enterprise Service Architectures and the Cloud
    Java EE Web Profile and Platform Technologies
    Java ME, Java Card, Embedded, and Devices
    JavaFX and Rich User Experiences”

Meloan artfully reminds us of how JavaOne makes learning fun.

Have a look at the article here.

Monday Oct 08, 2012

JavaOne Content Available for Free

JavaOne content is available in video in three sizes, depending on if you want to have a sip, have a drink, or go to the proverbial firehose.

Tall (Keynote Highlights)

Go to the JavaOne playlist on the YouTube Java channel for highlights of the JavaOne Keynotes. 

Grande (Keynotes in Full)

Go to the Oracle Media Network JavaOne 2012 channel to view the keynotes in full (Community Keynote coming soon).

Venti (All Sessions, BOFs and Tutorials)

To view slides paired with audio of each session, go to the JavaOne content catalog (JavaOne homepage, click on JavaOne Technical Sessions) and select a session. If a video is available, you'll see "Media" in the right column. Look under "Presentation Download" to get the slides. Sessions are being made available as quickly as possible.

"It's exciting to see Oracle take community stewardship so seriously," said Sharat Chander, Group Director for Java Technology Outreach. "Making all JavaOne sessions on video available online for free will helps make the future Java for everyone." Thanks to Oracle for funding this and providing to it to the Java Community for free.

Wednesday Oct 03, 2012

Huge Opportunity in Small Things

Addressing the strong demand for Java in the embedded market, Oracle is hosting a new Java Embedded @ JavaOne event in San Francisco October 3-4. The event allows decision makers to attend the Java Embedded @ JavaOne business-focused program, while their IT/development staff can attend the technically-focused JavaOne conference. [Obligatory comment about suits & ties vs. jeans & T-shirts removed.]

The two-day event includes keynotes, sessions and demonstrations. In his keynote this morning, Judson Althoff, Senior Vice President of Worldwide Alliances and Channels and Embedded Sales, Oracle explained 
  • Devices are all around us - on 24x7, connected all the time.
  • The explosion of devices is the next IT revolution.
  • Java is the right solution for this space.
  • Java embedded solutions provide a framework to  provision, manage, and secure devices. 
  • Java embedded solutions also provide the ability to aggregate, process and analyze multitude of data. 
  • Java is one platform to program them all.
Terrance Barr, Java Evangelist and Java ME expert is enthusiastic about the huge opportunity, "It's the right time and right place for Java Embedded," he said, "Oracle is looking for partners who want to take advantage of this next wave in IT."

The Embedded space continues to heat up. Today, Cinterion launched the EHS5, an ultra compact, high-speed M2M communication module providing secure wireless connectivity for a wide variety of industrial applications. Last week, Oracle announced Oracle Java ME Embedded 3.2, a complete client Java runtime Optimized for resource-constrained, connected, embedded systems, Oracle Java Wireless Client 3.2, Oracle Java ME Software Development Kit (SDK) 3.2, and Oracle Java Embedded Suite 7.0 for larger embedded devices. There is a huge opportunity in small things. 

Sunday Sep 30, 2012

Talking JavaOne with Rock Star Kirk Pepperdine

Kirk Pepperdine is not only a JavaOne Rock Star but a Java Champion and a highly regarded expert in Java performance tuning who works as a consultant, educator, and author. He is the principal consultant at Kodewerk Ltd. He speaks frequently at conferences and co-authored the Ant Developer's Handbook. In the rapidly shifting world of information technology, Pepperdine, as much as anyone, keeps up with what's happening with Java performance tuning.

Pepperdine will participate in the following sessions:

  • CON5405 - Are Your Garbage Collection Logs Speaking to You?
  • BOF6540 - Java Champions and JUG Leaders Meet Oracle Executives (with Jeff Genender, Mattias Karlsson, Henrik Stahl, Georges Saab)
  • HOL6500 - Finding and Solving Java Deadlocks (with Heinz Kabutz, Ellen Kraffmiller Martijn Verburg, Jeff Genender, and Henri Tremblay)


I asked him what technological changes need to be taken into account in performance tuning. “The volume of data we're dealing with just seems to be getting bigger and bigger all the time,” observed Pepperdine. “A couple of years ago you'd never think of needing a heap that was 64g, but today there are deployments where the heap has grown to 256g and tomorrow there are plans for heaps that are even larger. Dealing with all that data simply requires more horse power and some very specialized techniques. In some cases, teams are trying to push hardware to the breaking point. Under those conditions, you need to be very clever just to get things to work -- let alone to get them to be fast. We are very quickly moving from a world where everything happens in a transaction to one where if you were to even consider using a transaction, you've lost."

When asked about the greatest misconceptions about performance tuning that he currently encounters, he said, “If you have a performance problem, you should start looking at code at the very least and for that extra step, whip out an execution profiler. I'm not going to say that I never use execution profilers or look at code. What I will say is that execution profilers are effective for a small subset of performance problems and code is literally the last thing you should look at.

And what is the most exciting thing happening in the world of Java today? “Interesting question because so many people would say that nothing exciting is happening in Java. Some might be disappointed that a few features have slipped in terms of scheduling. But I'd disagree with the first group and I'm not so concerned about the slippage because I still see a lot of exciting things happening. First, lambda will finally be with us and with lambda will come better ways.”

For JavaOne, he is proctoring for Heinz Kabutz's lab. “I'm actually looking forward to that more than I am to my own talk,” he remarked. “Heinz will be the third non-Sun/Oracle employee to present a lab and the first since Oracle began hosting JavaOne. He's got a great message. He's spent a ton of time making sure things are going to work, and we've got a great team of proctors to help out. After that, getting my talk done, the Java Champion's panel session and then kicking back and just meeting up and talking to some Java heads."

Finally, what should Java developers know that they currently do not know? “’Write Once, Run Everywhere’ is a great slogan and Java has come closer to that dream than any other technology stack that I've used. That said, different hardware bits work differently and as hard as we try, the JVM can't hide all the differences. Plus, if we are to get good performance we need to work with our hardware and not against it. All this implies that Java developers need to know more about the hardware they are deploying to.”

Originally published on blogs.oracle.com/javaone.

Friday Sep 28, 2012

JavaOne LAD Call for Papers

JavaOne LAD Call for Papers closes next Friday, October 5. Here are Java Evangelist Steven Chin's top three reasons why you submit a session:

1) Imagine a parallel world where Java is king. Where the government has mandated that all software be open-source and recognized Java as an official platform. That is exactly what happened in Brazil and it shows in all aspects of their country from government systems to TV standards.

2) A JUG in Every Village - Brazil has the most user groups of any country in the world by a significant margin. "I've stayed after JavaOne to visit several cities and gotten a great audience whether it was a large city like Brasilia or Goiania, or a coastal town like Fortaleza, Salvador, or Maceio," Chin explains.

3) A Community-Supported Conference - SouJava and the entire Brazilian user group community is active and involved with JavaOne Brazil, making it a really engaging regional JavaOne conference.

Submissions should be:

  • From the community, all proposals should be non-Oracle.
  • Java-related topics (not technologies such as Flex, .NET, Objective C, etc... unless it's specifically a topic about how such things INTEGRATE with Java)
  • Non-product pitches
  • Interesting/innovative uses of Java
  • Practical relevant case studies/examples/practices/etc.

The call for papers will close on Friday, October 5, 2012 at 11:59 pm local time.
We look forward to hearing from you!

Thursday Sep 27, 2012

Talking JavaOne with Rock Star Martijn Verburg

JavaOne Rock Stars, conceived in 2005, are the top-rated speakers at each JavaOne Conference. They are awarded by their peers, who, through conference surveys, recognize them for their outstanding sessions and speaking ability. Over the years many of the world’s leading Java developers have been so recognized.

Martijn Verburg has, in recent years, established himself as an important mover and shaker in the Java community. His “Diabolical Developer” session at the JavaOne 2011 Conference got people’s attention by identifying some of the worst practices Java developers are prone to engage in. Among other things, he is co-leader and organizer of the thriving London Java User Group (JUG) which has more than 2,500 members, co-represents the London JUG on the Executive Committee of the Java Community Process, and leads the global effort for the Java User Group “Adopt a JSR” and “Adopt OpenJDK” programs.

Career highlights include overhauling technology stacks and SDLC practices at Mizuho International, mentoring Oracle on technical community management, and running off shore development teams for AIG. He is currently CTO at jClarity, a start-up focusing on automating optimization for Java/JVM related technologies, and Product Advisor at ZeroTurnaround. He co-authored, with Ben Evans, "The Well-Grounded Java Developer" published by Manning and, as a leading authority on technical team optimization, he is in high demand at major software conferences.

Verburg is participating in five sessions, a busy man indeed. Here they are:

  • CON6152 - Modern Software Development Antipatterns (with Ben Evans)
  • UGF10434 - JCP and OpenJDK: Using the JUGs’ “Adopt” Programs in Your Group (with Csaba Toth)
  • BOF4047 - OpenJDK Building and Testing: Case Study—Java User Group OpenJDK Bugathon (with Ben Evans and Cecilia Borg)
  • BOF6283 - 101 Ways to Improve Java: Why Developer Participation Matters (with Bruno Souza and Heather Vancura-Chilson)
  • HOL6500 - Finding and Solving Java Deadlocks (with Heinz Kabutz, Kirk Pepperdine, Ellen Kraffmiller and Henri Tremblay)
When I asked Verburg about the biggest mistakes Java developers tend to make, he listed three:
  1. A lack of communication -- Software development is far more a social activity than a technical one; most projects fail because of communication issues and social dynamics, not because of a bad technical decision. Sadly, many developers never learn this lesson.
  2. No source control -- Developers simply storing code in local filesystems and emailing code in order to integrate
  3. Design-driven Design -- The need for some developers to cram every design pattern from the Gang of Four (GoF) book into their source code

All of which raises the question: If these practices are so bad, why do developers engage in them? “I've seen a wide gamut of reasons,” said Verburg, who lists them as:

* They were never taught at high school/university that their bad habits were harmful.
* They weren't mentored in their first professional roles.
* They've lost passion for their craft.
* They're being deliberately malicious!
* They think software development is a technical activity and not a social one.
* They think that they'll be able to tidy it up later.

A couple of key confusions and misconceptions beset Java developers, according to Verburg.

“With Java and the JVM in particular I've seen a couple of trends,” he remarked. “One is that developers think that the JVM is a magic box that will clean up their memory, make their code run fast, as well as make them cups of coffee. The JVM does help in a lot of cases, but bad code can and will still lead to terrible results! The other trend is to try and force Java (the language) to do something it's not very good at, such as rapid web development. So you get a proliferation of overly complex frameworks, libraries and techniques trying to get around the fact that Java is a monolithic, statically typed, compiled, OO environment. It's not a Golden Hammer!”

I asked him about the keys to running a good Java User Group. “You need to have a ‘Why,’” he observed. “Many user groups know what they do (typically, events) and how they do it (the logistics), but what really drives users to join your group and to stay is to give them a purpose. For example, within the LJC we constantly talk about the ‘Why,’ which in our case is several whys:

* Re-ignite the passion that developers have for their craft
* Raise the bar of Java developers in London
* We want developers to have a voice in deciding the future of Java
* We want to inspire the next generation of tech leaders
* To bring the disparate tech groups in London together
* So we could learn from each other
* We believe that the Java ecosystem forms a cornerstone of our society today -- we want to protect that for the future

Looking ahead to Java 8 Verburg expressed excitement about Lambdas.

“I cannot wait for Lambdas,” he enthused. “Brian Goetz and his group are doing a great job, especially given some of the backwards compatibility that they have to maintain. It's going to remove a lot of boiler plate and yet maintain readability, plus enable massive scaling.”

Check out Martijn Verburg at JavaOne if you get a chance, and, stay tuned for a longer interview yours truly did with Martijn to be publish on otn/java some time after JavaOne.

Originally published on blogs.oracle.com/javaone.



Mini Theater at OTN Lounge During JavaOne

This year, the Oracle Technology Network Lounge at JavaOne will be in the Hilton Ballroom, right in the center of theJavaOne DEMOgrounds. We'll have Java experts, community members and OTN staff to answer your questions. We've also even created a "Mini Theater" for casual demos from community members and Oracle staff. We are keeping the slots short, there will be no tests afterwards. It's your chance to talk to the experts 1 on 1.

See how easy it is to turn on a lightbulb with Java and a violin.

Here is the full schedule:

Monday, October 1

9:40-9:50am  Learn about the Oracle Social Network Developer Challenge

11:20-11:30  Update from the Oracle Academy

11:40-11:50  Caroline Kvitka, @OracleJavaMag, Editor-in-Chief of Java Magazine

12:00-12:20pm  SouJava demonstrates Duke's Choice Award Winner JHome

12:20-12:30pm  Geertjan Wielenga (@geertjanw) Shows What's new in NetBeans

12:40-12:50pm  Learn about the OSN Developer Challenge

 2:00-2:10pm  Java.net Robotics

 2:30-2:40pm  Geertjan Wielenga (@geertjanw) Java EE and NetBeans

 3:10-3:15pm  Learn about the Oracle Social Network Developer Challenge

 4:10-4:20pm Update on the Java Community Process (JCP)

Tuesday, October 2

9:40-9:50am  Greenfoot/Kinect demo by Michael Kolling

11:20-11:30  Caroline Kvitka, @OracleJavaMag, Editor-in-Chief of Java Magazine

11:40-11:50  Stephen Chin and Jim Weaver, Top Ten JavaFX Features

12:00-12:10pm  Nokia Student Developer

12:20-12:30pm Arun Gupta, HTML 5 and Java EE 7

1:00-1:10pm Update on the Java Community Process (JCP)

1:20-1:30pm  Update from the Oracle Academy

 2:00-2:10pm  Java.net Robotics

 2:30-2:40pm  Geertjan Wielenga (@geertjanw) NetBeans Java Editor

Wednesday, October 3

9:40-9:50am  Greenfoot/Kinect demo by Michael Kolling

11:00-11:10  Caroline Kvitka, @OracleJavaMag, Editor-in-Chief of Java Magazine

11:20-11:30  Angela Caicedo and Jim Weaver, Leveraging JavaFX and HTML5

12:00-12:10pm  Nokia Student Developer

12:10-12:30pm  SouJava demonstrates Duke's Choice Award Winner JHome

12:40-12:50  Angela Caicedo and Jim Weaver, Using Canvas and Pixels in JavaFX

 2:00-2:10pm  Stephen Chin and Jim Weaver, JavaFX Deployment with Self-Contained Apps

 2:30-2:40pm  Geertjan Wielenga (@geertjanw) NetBeans Platform

 2:50-3:00pm  Petr Jiricka, Project Easel

Changes to this schedule will be announced on @JavaOneConf.

About

Insider News from the Java Team at Oracle!

duke
javeone logo
Links


Search

Archives
« April 2014
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
  
2
5
6
7
12
13
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
   
       
Today