Monday Apr 14, 2014

Building Robots with Java Embedded

Join us for the new training on building robots with Java Embedded. This training is free and will be live on hangout or YouTube, Tuesday April 15 at 10:00am Singapore time; 7:30am India Mumbai; 11:00am Tokyo Japan; 2:00am UTC. Globalcode founder and embedded expert Vinicius Senger will focus on homemade robots and the Lego Mindstorms robots.

This training offers a chance to direct questions to top experts and get you started with your own project.  Once you have your own project ready, submit a video and the code by May 30 for a chance to win a trip to JavaOne 2014.

More resources and the support forum are available online. Learn about the Challenge rules.

Wednesday Mar 05, 2014

JavaOne 2014 Call for Papers Now Open!

It is time to submit all those talks you have been thinking about. "We have a huge focus on community at this event, and it would be great to have many proposals from the developer community." explains JavaOne Content Chair Stephen Chin.

There is a new dedicated track for Agile development this year, making a total of nine Java tracks.  This year's tracks are: 

• Clients and UI
• Core Java Platform
• Internet of Things
• Java Virtual Machine Languages
• Java and Security
• Tools and Techniques
• Server-Side Java
• Java in the Cloud
• Agile Development

There is no time to waste! The call for papers closes April 15th at 11:59 p.m. PDT  

You will receive a complimentary pass to JavaOne with an accepted talk.

There is a rolling submission process, so submit early! 

Wednesday Nov 20, 2013

More JavaOne Sessions Online

A new batch of JavaOne sessions are now online for you to view.  From Hadoop to M2M, and even Minecraft, these sessions give you the best technical information. My favorite from the latest batch: The Seven Deadly Sins of Java EE Projects by Markus Eisele.  

You can also download the JavaOne app from Parleys (for iPad or Android) to view the JavaOne sessions both online and offline.

We'll be rolling out new sessions until the end of the year, so check back often for the latest content. It's all free, brought to you by the Oracle. Check them out!

Monday Oct 21, 2013

Oracle’s Java Community Outreach Plan

As the steward of Java, Oracle recognizes the importance and value of the Java community, and the relevant role it plays in keeping Java the largest, most vibrant developer community in the world.  

In order to increase Oracle’s touch with Java developers worldwide, we are shifting our focus from a flagship JavaOne event followed by several regional JavaOne conferences, to a new outreach model which continues with the JavaOne flagship event, as well as a mix of online content, regional Java Tours, and regional 3rd party event participation. 

1. JavaOne

  • JavaOne continues to remain the premier hub for Java developers where you are given the opportunity to improve your Java technical skills, and interact with other members of the Java community. JavaOne is centered on open collaboration and sharing, and Oracle will continue to invest in JavaOne as a unique stand-alone event for the Java community.
  • Oracle recognizes that many developers cannot attend JavaOne in person, therefore Oracle will share the wealth of the unique event material to those developers through a new and easy-to-access online Java program. While online JavaOne content cannot address the importance of actual face-to-face community/developer engagements and networking, online content does aide in extending the Java technical learning opportunity to a broader collection of developers.
2. Java Developer Day Tours
  • Oracle will execute regional Java Developer Days with recognized Java User Groups (JUGs) with participation from Java Evangelist and Java Champions. This allows local, regional specific Java topics to be addressed both by Oracle and the Java community.
  • In addition, Oracle will deliver more virtual technical content programs to reach developers where an existing JUG may not have a presence.
3. Sponsorship of Community-Driven Regional Events/Conferences
  • Oracle also recognizes that improved community dialog and relations are achievable by continued Oracle sponsorship and onsite participation at both established/well-recognized 3rd party events and new emerging/growing 3rd party events.

Oracle’s ultimate goal is to be an even better steward for Java by reaching more of the Java ecosystem with face-to-face and online community engagements. We look forward to planning tours and events with you, members of the Java community.

Monday Oct 14, 2013

JavaOne 2013 Review: Java Takes on the Internet of Things

A new article, now up on otn/java titled “JavaOne 2013 Review: Java Takes on the Internet of Things,” takes a look back at the lively happenings at JavaOne 2013, which reprised the 2012 JavaOne "Make the Future Java" theme. The articles quotes JavaOne keynoter Peter Utzschneider, Vice President, Java Product Management at Oracle, who said, "There is a lot going on in the industry, with massive shifts and innovation happening which pose huge challenges and opportunities for Java."

He observed that Oracle shares a common goal with the Java community—to make Java better, stronger, more robust, and relevant for decades to come.

The article reviews the extraordinary success of the Java platform:
* There are 9 million Java developers worldwide.
* It's the #1 choice for developers.
* It's the #1 development platform.
* 3 billion mobile phones run Java.
* 100 percent of Blu-ray disc players ship with Java.
* 97 percent of enterprise desktops run Java.
* 5 billion Java Cards are in use.
* 7 billion Java Cards have been sold.
* 89 percent of desktops run Java.
* 125 million TV devices run Java.
* Five of the top-five OEMs ship Java.

A central theme of JavaOne 2013 was how Java makes a perfect fit for the coming Internet of Things (IoT):

“First,” the article points out, “the Internet of Things (IoT) is here to stay and is likely to alter our daily lives in coming years. As embedded devices get cheaper, more powerful, and more connected, and as the IoT grows, Java developers will face radical new challenges—not the least of which is security. Along with this, cloud computing has taken hold, complementing the IoT and making big and fast data available and ready to be analyzed.”

Nandini Ramani, VP of Engineering, Java Client and Embedded Platforms, Oracle, pointed out that the Java platform is in the process of being unified: "First, Moore's Law is making devices more capable. Second, Java SE is being shrunk to fit into the embedded space and smaller devices. And third, Java ME is being brought up to be in parity with Java SE."

Find out about the Duke’s Choice and Java Community Process Awards, the JavaOne DEMOgrounds, the JavaOne Codegarten and much more.
Link to it here.

Wednesday Oct 02, 2013

Video: Java Powers the Smart Home

How much control do you want to have over everything in your home? With Java, you can control lights, cameras and appliances easily. You can even determine when to run the washing machine based on the cost of power! In this video, Engineer Volker Bauche shows Java powering sensors around a smart home. From the DEMOgrounds of JavaOne 2013, by Tori Wieldt.

Learn more about the Java and the Internet of Things on the Oracle Technology Network.

Wednesday Sep 25, 2013

Brazilian Java Man at JavaOne

In this video, Bruno Souza and Java Community Manager Tori Wieldt discuss JavaOne, the Java Community Process (JCP), cloud computing and mad scientists.

Java in Action at JavaOne: The People Counter

There's a lot of action at JavaOne, lots of movement. We've got robots, cars, door sensors, apps in the cloud and more. In this video, Architect Oleg Kostukovsky describes the People Counter, a combination of sensors, gateways, a database in the cloud, and a JavaFX UI which provides real time data on people movement.

Tuesday Sep 24, 2013

Session Report: Internet of Things with Java

by Timothy Beneke

Jai Suri, Group Product Manager, Java Platform, at Oracle, with Oracle Embedded Java architect, Noel Poore, gave a session that was both practical and visionary, titled “Internet of Things with Java” that provided a glimpse of the challenges and prospects faced by the coming Internet of Things (IoT). Suri was quick to point out that the session was not a showcase of Oracle solutions for IoT; nor would it provide best practices or design patterns for IoT. “It’s too early and we’re not there yet,” said Suri.

He pointed out that the potential range of IoT applications is vast, from home and industrial automation to improved healthcare. His team has been spending a lot of time and effort trying to figure out how Java fits into the IoT space.

The IoT market is relatively new and evolving, and full of proprietary technologies with, as yet, no standardization. The biggest challenge Java faces is creating a horizontal technology stack that addresses a wide range of needs and challenges. IoT, he pointed out is nothing new – machines connecting with other machines go back to the dawn of computing. But recently, new technologies have made it more accessible than ever before. In the US, Comcast offers XFINITY home automation offering remote monitoring, temperature, lighting and small appliance control, real-time alerts when doors or windows are opened, and more. In Europe, Deutsche Telekom offers a similar system.

In health care, remote patient monitoring is an area of rapid growth. IoT is making a difference in industrial automation and business optimization and efficiency. Other segments of IoT growth include building management, energy, consumer, retail, IT and networks. Research groups are predicting a market of somewhere around $350 Billion by 2017, some of which will be committed to technology.

According to Suri, various factors are driving the growth in IoT. First, connected devices are growing rapidly, with shipments expected to range from $50B to $200B by 2020. Moore’s law is allowing devices to become smarter and, as a result, connectivity is cheaper. Extra bandwidth is available to be redeployed for data traffic and channels are being created that allow companies to move data more cheaply.

IoT traffic data is being stored in databases to be analyzed, so data is growing rapidly. Business opportunities are increasing as the number of devices connected to the cloud allowing for the tracking of shipments, cars and other things grows.

Why is this different from a simple client and server? First the number of web, desktop and mobile applications talking to a server is rapidly increasing. Devices may be on batteries, Wifi, Bluetooth or a long range network – the complexity is huge. And most of these devices do not have a human operating them.

IoT lacks any standard protocol for communication among devices. Protocols depend upon the industry. In home automation, Bluetooth is common along with short range radio networks. Ultimately it is about how users get and receive data from devices. Suri pointed out that most developers give little thought to security. When he joined Oracle he received a badge that allows him to access and send protected data; the badge provides his identity, which governs access. But how do we put an identity on a temperature sensor connected to our home gateway? Or on data about our medical condition?

Some companies are building data centers that allow companies to connect their enterprise applications to a data center so they won’t have to worry about scaling. But is this the right approach when a company has invested millions of dollars in enterprise infrastructure? Why leverage what you already have?

Suri summarized the critical issues:
--Communication across multiple-protocol networks
--End-to-end security
--Software provisioning & lifecycle management across diverse devices
--Data acquisition from thousands of diverse devices
--Managing large volumes of fast data in a scalable architecture
--Leveraging existing enterprise architectures for evolving IoT needs

With most IoT solutions currently being written from scratch, the need for a horizontal platform seems obvious.

How Java Fits In
Noel Poore then showed how Java is the best fit for IoT, emphasizing that his focus was on the IoT with Java and not the Java Internet of Things. In a situation so fragmented with different device drivers, chip sets, operating systems and so on, the availability of a platform that allows developers to move code around with little worry about which device is running it is ideal.

Managing 50 billion devices sensibly and scalably constitutes a huge challenge. Poore presented a conceptual architecture with the pieces that need to be in place for a horizontal IoT platform to work. This would enable developers to build solutions based on platform rather than rebuilding the solution every time a different IoT problem must be solved. The conceptual architecture begins with wireless and wired sensors feeding into an initial gateway which feeds into a core network; in addition smart sensors may bypass the initial gateway and go directly to the network. The network feeds into an IoT communication gateway, which in turn feeds access management, IoT management and data routing and analysis. The first of these two feed into identity access and management, while data routing and analysis is sent to enterprise business and business intelligence to attempt to gain value from the data.

Suri closed by summarizing the take-home points of the session:

* IoT technologies are a “Wild West” full of proprietary implementations and a highly fragmented vendor ecosystem.
* Java enables an open and standards-based secure IoT platform that seamlessly integrates devices with enterprise applications.
* But significant innovations are needed across the platform and the ecosystem products to make this vision a reality.
* The good news is that Java is ahead of the curve, and very well positioned to become the de facto platform for IoT applications.

Look for podcasts of JavaOne sessions at Parleys.com starting in early October.

Monday Sep 23, 2013

Videos: JavaOne Keynote Highlights

Watch highlights from yesterday's JavaOne keynotes.

JavaOne Strategy Keynote Highlights 

JavaOne Technical Keynote Highlights 

Want more? Read At the JavaOne 2013 Strategy Keynote.

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