Wednesday Sep 25, 2013

Session Report: Is It a Car? Is It a Computer? No, It’s a Raspberry Pi JavaFX Informatics System

by Timothy Beneke

On Tuesday, Oracle Technology Evangelist Simon Ritter presented a session that demonstrated how a simple Raspberry Pi computer could be connected to an Audi to access far more information about the inner workings of the Audi than is currently available. Ritter, a great showman who has entertained thousands of JavaOne attendees over the years with his Java tricks, communicated his contagious passion for gadgets – and for sharing them with others.


“I love computers and all things electronic, and I also love cars – I’m a petrolhead -- so I’ve combined these 2 passions into one thing,” said Ritter. 

His talk was divided into several sections. He began by talking about the reliance of cars upon computers and moved to a discussion of the Raspberry Pi and why it’s a good choice for the kinds of systems he built into his car. He went on to briefly provide some background about embedded Java and JavaFX, and why they are good choices for the Raspberry Pi. He then spent much of the session describing the software system he built in his car, its functionality, how it works, and so on. He speculated on possible future enhancements to his “carputer,” and, finally, showed a video that provided a sense of what it is like to ride in the car with the new data accessible.

He initially made the point that computers and cars are now inexorably tied together. His first car, a 1971 Mini Clubman 1000 had, aside from a radio, no electronics. In contrast, his most recent car, a 2011 Audi S3, has lots of electronic devices, like all modern cars: an engine control unit, fuel injection/electronic timing, “Fly-by-wire” throttle, an anti-lock braking system, Satellite navigation, auto-sensing wipers and lights, and much more, some of which are mandated by law. The key point is that cars are already heavily computerized.

He described how the bus architecture works in the Audi, a communication system that transfers data between components inside a computer, and presented basic information about embedded Java, Java ME and JavaFX.

The Advantages of the Raspberry Pi for Car Computing
Ritter described the history of the remarkable Raspberry Pi, a project begun in 2006 that was initially created to inspire children to learn about computers. It was officially launched on Feb 29th, 2012 and currently, nearly 2 million have been shipped at a cost of around $25. It is ideal for children because of its cost and ease of use.

Its core features are:

* CPU: ARM 11 (v6) core running at 700MHz
– Broadcom SoC package
– Can now be overclocked to 1GHz (without breaking the warranty!)
* Memory: 512Mb
* I/O:
– HDMI and composite video
– Audio out (3.5mm plug)
– 2 x USB ports
– Ethernet
– Header pins for GPIO, UART, SPI and I2C

Ritter pointed out that adult computer geeks have been playing with the Raspberry Pi in countless ways. He then summarized why it is ideal for car computing:
* It has plenty of computing power with low electrical power consumption (< 1 Amp at 5V).
* Persistent storage is provided by the SD card.
– Disk drives are not ideal in hot places with lots of vibration.
– It’s a supported device for embedded Java.
– It is configured for floating point acceleration.
– It works with Java SE Embedded and Java ME Embedded.
                  --   A JavaFX Prism graphics engine is ported.

His goal was to gain new information from his car in real-time and have it available for analysis to ultimately improve his driving style:
* Display realtime data
– Engine performance (Power, Torque, Load)
– Driver data (Throttle position, steering angle, braking force, etc)
– G-Forces on car
* Record data for later analysis
– Produce graphs to display changes over time
– Play at Formula 1
– Improve driving style

He went on to describe the creation of the accelerometer, touch screen, measures of torque, among other things, and closed with a 3-minute video showing the box in action in the car from the perspective of someone riding in the car with various measures visible. Then he played back the information recorded on the drive.

All in all, a super entertaining, informative session.

Ritter will be posting more info about his session here: blogs.oracle.com/speakjava

Audi
The Raspberry Pi
Check out Parleys.com where you can listen to the session in early October.

Java in Action at JavaOne: The People Counter

There's a lot of action at JavaOne, lots of movement. We've got robots, cars, door sensors, apps in the cloud and more. In this video, Architect Oleg Kostukovsky describes the People Counter, a combination of sensors, gateways, a database in the cloud, and a JavaFX UI which provides real time data on people movement.

Tuesday Sep 17, 2013

A Conversation with Java Champion Johan Vos

A new interview is now up on otn/java. In it, Johan Vos, a highly regarded Java Champion whose focus is on combining the strengths of back-end systems and embedded devices, provides his insightful take on what’s happening in the world of Java technology. His favorite technologies are currently Java EE/Glassfish at the backend and JavaFX at the front-end. He is a co-author of Pro JavaFX 2, and will be offering two sessions at JavaOne 2013.  

In the interview, Vos summarizes his sessions:

“In ‘Building Social Software on Top of Java EE 7 with DaliCore,’ I’ll show how you can integrate social software functionality into Java EE 7 applications. Many enterprise applications can benefit from some kinds of integration with e.g., Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, etc., without jeopardizing the user’s privacy and without giving up ownership of the data. The DaliCore framework adds the concept of User and OnlineAccount to the Java EE world, and provides the coupling with existing social networks. This saves lots of project-specific boilerplate code. This approach works both in web-applications as well as in desktop applications.

In ‘DataFX: The Best Way to Get Real-World Data into Your JavaFX Application,’ Hendrik Ebbers and I will present DataFX 2, a framework that helps JavaFX developers to populate JavaFX controls with real-world data. Now that JavaFX is beyond the stage of demos and POCs, it becomes important that the fake data used in demos be replaced with real data, often coming from back-end servers and databases. Apart from the regular cases where a JDBC source or a RESTful web service is queried, we will also show how changes in the local data can be propagated to the backend again...”

In discussing his efforts to combine Java EE and JavaFX, Vos remarks: “I am convinced that these two technologies are complementary, and while they are completely decoupled, the combination of them can lead to great end-to-end projects. As a POC, and in order to get more realistic use cases that could benefit both DaliCore and DataFX, I started to write a JavaFX application that offers community functionality. The front-end of that application is written in JavaFX, and the back-end is using DaliCore on top of Java EE 7. In this application, lots of data is sent from and to the back-end.”

In addition, Vos discusses his experiences with Java EE 7 and Java SE 8, the revolution that lambda expressions bring to Java, the client aspect of Java, how JavaFX fits into Java SE 8, and much more.

Check out the interview here.

Friday Sep 13, 2013

Simon Ritter Prepares to Show off Java SE 8 at JavaOne

Oracle’s Simon Ritter has more tricks up his sleeve with cars and hand-tracking devices.[Read More]

Friday Sep 06, 2013

Java Champion/Rock Star Adam Bien at JavaOne 2013

Java Champions are developers who have made important contributions to the Java community; JavaOne Rock Stars are developers who have given highly rated sessions at JavaOne. Adam Bien is both – and one of the most distinguished Java developers in the community. He is an Expert Group member for the Java EE 6/7, EJB 3.X, JAX-RS and JPA 2.X JSRs and is an architect and developer for Java SE and Java EE projects. He has edited several books about JavaFX, J2EE, and Java EE, and is the author of Real World Java EE Patterns—Rethinking Best Practices, and Real World Java EE Night Hacks.

Bien is a Top Java Ambassador 2012, and JavaOne 2009, 2011, 2012 Rock Star. If all this were not enough, he was, in 2010, named Oracle Magazine’s Java Developer of the Year.

His 2013 sessions include:

CON2196: “Lean and Opinionated Java EE 7 Applications”
CON2229: “Architecting Enterprise JavaFX 8 Applications”
CON2230:  “Unit Tests Don’t Break: Stress-Testing Java EE Applications”
CON2231: “Demystifying Java EE”
UGF10369: “Cool NetBeans Tips and Tricks for Java EE 7 Development”

Q: Tell us about your JavaOne sessions.

Bien: In “Cool NetBeans Tips and Tricks for Java EE 7 Development,” I will introduce my favorite NetBeans features. I think I may surprise some attendees with NetBean's productivity and effectiveness.

In “Architecting Enterprise JavaFX 8 Applications,” I would like to introduce a Model View Presenter Architecture with Dependency Injection based on a "framework," only containing two classes. I would also like to highlight the interaction with SceneBuilder, the JavaFX WYSIWYG editor, without being too heavily dependent on it.

In the session "Demystifying Java EE," I will discuss some recurring misconceptions about the concepts and inner workings of Java EE. There is no magic in Java EE – Java EE 7 is very effective, if you follow some rules.

In “Lean and Opinionated Java EE 7 Applications,” I will introduce opinionated approaches and best practices for the design and implementation of Java EE 7 applications. I'm probably going to shock some architects, but the developers should like this session.

In “Unit Tests Don’t Break: Stress-Testing Java EE Applications,” I plan to stress test a Java EE 7 application and monitor the results in real time. Stress testing is incredibly important and sometimes not even a part of the development cycle.

Q: In addition to your sessions, what do you have planned for JavaOne?

Bien: JavaOne is one of the few conferences where I attend other sessions -- from dawn to dusk. In recent years there was not always time to pick lunch. At NetBeans/GlassFish days before JavaOne I will probably meet some Java friends, while at the actual JavaOne I’ve never managed to do that. The technical content is too good and there is not enough time between the sessions.

Q: Tell us about what’s happening with Enterprise JavaFX 8 apps.

Bien: In the recent edition of airhacks.com I started with HTML 5, but most of the attendees waited for Java FX 8 news. There are a lot of Swing applications out there. Migration from Swing to JavaFX is one of the FAQs. Also JavaFX is "just" Java. You can develop now from the User Interface to the back end using the same language, tools, and environments. You can use the same debugger, profiler or memory analyzer for all of your application tiers and layers. JavaFX suits perfectly enterprise application needs.

Q: What have you been working on lately?

Bien: I’ve helped my customers implement Java EE 7 and JavaFX applications. Also, I ported lightfish.adam-bien.com to Java EE 7 and GlassFish v4 and was even able to simplify the code. I also ported Apache FTP Mina to JavaEE7: http://e2ftp.adam-bien.com

Q: What are your expectations for Java EE 7? For Java SE 8?

Bien: I was already very happy with Java EE 6, so Java EE 7 can only exceed my expectations. I'm using daily builds of JavaFX coming with JDK 1.8 for my "leisure" activities. Here I would expect more stability and even better performance. 

Q: How do you assess the state of Java today?

Bien: Java is more interesting for building apps, than ever. And the interest is huge. This year there is an increased tendency to sell out workshops, sessions and conferences. Java 8 together with Java EE 7 and JavaFX 8 will make it even more interesting.

Java has only one problem: its age. We tend to forget how performant, scalable, ubiquitous, and "cutting edge" the Java ecosystem actually is.

Q: What should Java developers understand about unit testing?

Bien: Don't overdo it. Statistics do not matter. Test complex stuff first -- and there is no difference between writing tests for Java SE and Java EE applications

Q: Tell us about ways NetBeans can be used for Java EE 7 development?

A: With NetBeans I'm still able to surprise seasoned developers with productivity without any magic. As a contractor/freelancer I really don't like to spend any time with IDE maintenance and setup. With NetBeans I'm able to set up my full Java EE environment in about a minute on Linux, Windows or Mac. Without any plugins, configurations or restarts. For that reason, I'm using NetBeans daily builds without any friction. What I like the most: NetBeans supports me with integrated code completion, JavaDoc, hints and occasional helpers on demand (like, e.g., creation of beans.xml or persistence.xml) without excessive code generation or opaque wizards. You can achieve 80% with two shortcuts: ctrl + space and alt + enter.

Adam Bien’s Blog

Wednesday Jul 17, 2013

And The Winners Are.... the most popular articles on otn

Here is a list of the most popular articles, in terms of traffic, on otn/java in the last 12 months. It's, as usual, a rich mix of Java and Java-related technologies, types of articles and variety of authors.

Check out any that you might have missed and vote with your visit.


1.  “Getting Started with Java® SE Embedded on the Raspberry Pi" by Bill Courington and Gary Collins August 2012

2. “How to Get Started (FAST!) with JavaFX 2 and Scene Builder”  by Mark Heckler  November 2012

3. “Arun Gupta on Higher Productivity from Embracing HTML5 with Java EE 7”  by Janice J. Heiss  February 2013

4. “Java Experts on the State of Java” by Janice J. Heiss   January 2013

5. “Java EE 7 and JAX-RS 2.0” by Adam Bien  April 2013

6. “Coding on Crete: An Interview with Java Specialist Heinz Kabutz” by Janice J. Heiss     January 2013  http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/articles/java/heinzkabutz-1899134.html

7. “Why, Where, and How JavaFX Makes Sense”  by Björn Müller  March 2013

8. “The Advent of Kotlin: A Conversation with JetBrains' Andrey Breslav”  by Janice J. Heiss  April 2013

9. “The Enterprise Side of JavaFX”  by Adam Bien   June 2012

10. “JSR 356, Java API for WebSocket”  by Johan Vos  April 2013

And here are five runners up.

11. “Introducing Groovy”  by Jim Driscoll  July 2012

12. “The Enterprise Side of JavaFX: Part Two”  by Adam Bien  June 2012

13. “Expressing the UI for Enterprise Applications with JavaFX 2.0 FXML” by James L. Weaver  June 2012

14. “JavaOne 2012 Review: Make the Future Java” by Steve Meloan  October 2012

15. “Expressing the UI for Enterprise Applications with JavaFX 2.0 FXML - Part Two”  By James L. Weaver  September 2012

Thursday Jul 11, 2013

New Java Tutorials

Three new tutorials are now available on the Oracle Learning Library:
- New Java EE 7 tutorials and videos show how to create an application that uses the WebSocket API for real-time communication between a client and a server.
- Java SE tutorial on how the built-in Java™ security features protect you from malevolent programs

The Oracle Learning Library (OLL) is a repository of free online learning content covering Java technologies. The content ranges from videos, tutorials, articles, demos, step-by-step instructions to accomplish a specific task to in-depth, self-paced interactive learning modules. The content is developed by Oracle developers as well as trusted community members. New content is uploaded daily. 

The OLL have many features that include:
- Collections: groups of content that includes OLL content items, related training, and external links. You can choose to share your collection with others or keep your collections private. 
- My Library: A feature that helps you track all of the content that you have read, create bookmarks, and track the feedback and reviews you've created.
- OLL-Live: FREE, one-hour interactive webcasts from Oracle. At an OLL Live webcasts, you will experience an information packed session led by an Oracle expert showing you ways you can use Oracle products.

Monday Jul 08, 2013

Java Embedded Keynote at Jfokus 2014 now Available!

Senior Director of Product Management Henrik Stahl presented the keynote titled "Taking Development to the Edge."

"There is no cap in the number of devices you can have. You can have a device in every light bulb in your house. In your car, you might have 200 devices. They all will have to be programmed, secured and updated remotely" he commented. 

According to ARM, there are some 2,000 developers who program on embedded systems today. Java developers can easily build a career programming embedded systems because Java has technical and business advantages in the space. 

Henrik gives an update Java releases and presents use cases in smart grid, healthcare, traffic management, transportation, telemetry and more. 

Jfokus is an annual developer conference focusing on JVM languages and Java technologies. International rock-star speakers present the latest innovations and trends in the Java ecosystems.  Jfokus 2014 will be from February 3rd to 5th, 2014 in Stockholm, Sweden. 

Sunday Mar 24, 2013

Devoxx U.K. and France Coming Up!

The two spring Java developer conferences are taking place in two European capitals, London and Paris this week. Devoxx UK is on Tuesday and Wednesday, March 26 and 27 in London and Devoxx France is in on Thursday and Friday, March 28 and 29 in Paris. Devoxx France is sold out, but you can still join us in London. Register right away!

Oracle experts are giving a number of sessions about the future of Java technologies:
  • Arun Gupta and David Delabassee, Getting started with WebSocket and server sent events using Java
  • Attila Szegedi, project Nashorn
  • Milton Smith, securing the future with Java
  • Simon Ritter, 55 new features in Java SE 8
  • Angela Caicedo, beyond Beauty: JavaFX, parallax, touch, gyroscopes and much more
  • Simon Ritter and Steven Chin, the Mocha Rapberry Pi Lab
  • Angela Caicedo, opening the hidden door: JavaFX deployment everywhere
  • Patrick Curran and Heather Vancura, JCP & Adopt-a-JSR workshop
  • Patrick Curran and Heather Vancura, How to participate in the future of Java
  • Arun Gupta, teaching Java to a 10 year old

Come by the Oracle booth to talk to Oracle experts and staff members, hang out and win Raspberry Pis. Experts will demo Java SE, JavaFX, Java EE, Java ME and Embedded. Open seating area is available for anyone to hang out, meeting fellow developers and network. We will raffle Raspberry Pis (RPis) at the end of every day. At Devoxx UK, winners of 4 RPis will be announced at 7pm on Tuesday and at 3:45pm on Wednesday. At Devoxx France, winners of 3 RPis will be announced every day at 4:45pm.

Wednesday Mar 06, 2013

Get started with Java!

Every year, the Java platform is growing with new features for enterprise, web, embedded and mobile application and developers. To help beginners navigate the platform and get started with Java technologies, new learning resources are available on the New to Java website. Developers will write a "Hello World" application, test their Java knowledge,  create user interfaces with JavaFX, and build enterprise applications with Java EE, desktop applications with Java SE or applications for mobile and embedded devices.  

Being up to date about current trends and networking with other developers are also critical for a career in programming. Developers can connect with top leaders in the community at conferences and community networks such as local user groups. They have the chance to contribute to open-source projects such as OpenJDK and Adopt-a-JSR to name just two.

Finally, parents and educators teaching programming to children will find software tools for young developers. They are free downloadable development tools with easy to use interfaces for young students. And Minecraft is so popular! Java technologist Daniel Green walks us through Minecraft mods with Java.
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Insider News from the Java Team at Oracle!

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