Thursday Jan 29, 2015

A Young Woman Innovator Programs with Java

Hania Guiagoussou is a passionate Java developer and a high school student in Dublin, California. She developed a "Water Saver" system to control the water usage in any garden or field. She just won third place and the prize of ten thousand dollars in the Digital Innovative Challenges organized by the ITC/Telecoms  

Q: When did you start programming?

Hania: I started programming at the age of nine. My dad is a computer engineer and he encouraged my brother and me to program. I wasn’t into programming until I went to a Java programming summer workshop at Oracle where I learned object oriented programming using Alice. If it weren't for Alice, I wouldn't be interested in programming. Alice was fun and inspired me to create animation projects. 

Q: What have you been programming lately?

Hania: My last project was a “Water Saver” system. It is an implementation of machine-to-machine communication that optimizes the use of water. I used sensors to capture soil humidity and surrounding temperature. The sensors are connected to a Raspberry Pi from where an intelligent agent collects and analyzes environmental data, then records it in Java objects. I first created the system for a science fair project in Pleasanton California. My  friend and I were going to do a project to study the impact of herbal tea on the human memory. However, returning from school one day after it rained a lot, I saw sprinklers on even though plants and the soil had enough water in the entire neighborhood. At that time the news channels were all talking about water restrictions because of the drought in California. I said to myself “I’ve got the idea for my science fair competition!” 

Q: And you won an award for it...

Hania: Along with my teammate, we received a few awards from the local engineering and science fair in March 2014. We won a special award sponsored by the local utility company and third place in the Computer Science, Maths and Engineering category from over 300 projects. In September 2014, I had an opportunity to compete in an African competition in Chad where I made it to the final round in the Digital Innovative Challenges organized by the ITC/Telecoms and Information Ministries under the sponsorship of the president of Chad and in partnership with the International Telecommunication Organization (ITU). I was the youngest participant in the finals. My project won third place and I won a generous prize of 5 million local francs (around 10 thousand US dollars). 

Q: How would you advise young girls to get started in programming?

Hania: That's a really a good question because girls are not really interested in Computer Science. In my Computer Science and Engineering class, there are only 10 percent girls. I think girls should just play with tools like Alice and create animations using characters and virtual worlds of their choice. I would love to have an opportunity to show girls of my age the satisfaction of programming.

Q: How easy was it for you to get started?

Hania: Before the Alice workshop, I was not interested to go beyond the “Hello, World” application. With Alice I used advanced blocks of codes that were easy to comprehend as I was manipulating real objects using object-oriented programming. I was able to use the Java programming language without knowing I was coding. I had to get introduced in a way that I could embrace, enjoy and innovate.

Q: What do you like about Java?

Hania: I like how you can program it once and it runs on different environments. For example, for the water saver project, the program we created was targeting embedded systems and was tested on Raspberry Pi. But we initially developed the code using NetBeans on a Window PC. We took the same program and ran it on a Linux Operating system on Mac. We then moved the same code to the Raspberry Pi and it runs fine without a single code change. I really like the fact that I can program one time, run on my personal computer then have it working on many other devices. Additionally, creating a client side program using Android to connect the embedded world with our day to day devices was the icing on the cake. I was very happy when from my mobile phone and tablet I launched a standard HTML browser and controlled my application remotely. 

Q: What would you like to do as a career? 

Hania: It has always been my dream to become a doctor. Now, I’d like to pursue medical studies and combine it with tele-medicine to remotely help people in rural areas in developing country where heath-care system is not very developed. I want to become an influential women who can bring positive changes in people’s live. I hope one day to build a bridge between doctors from the U.S., Canada, Europe  in order to help doctors in Africa communicate and exchange experiences with each other and prevent deathly diseases. 


Friday Sep 12, 2014

JavaOne Rockstar Speaker Hendrik Ebbers

In a Java Magazine article, senior Java architect Hendrik Ebbers talks about his JavaOne sessions and JavaOne. "There will be some very cool JavaFX, community, open source and Internet of Things talks this year. The talks are always very professional; I have never experienced a bad one. So don't miss the talks" he explains.   

Hendrik focuses on research and development, Swing, JavaFX, middleware and DevOps. He wrote the book titled "Mastering JavaFX 8 Controls" and will present six JavaOne sessions:   
  • Smart UIs for Mobile and Embedded in JavaFX introduces a new JavaFX theme that is made for embedded devices and will fit perfect in all the cool new Internet of Things and mobile products. 
  • DataFX: From External Data to a UI Flow and Back shows how the different DataFX components make it easy to manage external data by using well-known Java technologies.
  • Enterprise JavaFX, an overview of various best practices for communication between server and client, async background tasks, MVC approaches, and the designing of complex dialogue flows
  • Extreme GUI Makeover.  JavaFX 8, a new UI toolkit, offers a lot of amazing features to help you craft modern-looking and interactive UIs.
  • The JavaFX Community and Ecosystem introduces the JavaFX ecosystem including third-party frameworks and popular knowledge base. It also illustrates the functionality and synergy effects between the libraries with a live coding session. 
  • Test-Driven Development with JavaFX

More about clients and user interface topics here

Monday Sep 08, 2014

Java for the Very Young

Children as young as 10 are learning about programming, robotics, and engineering at JavaOne. 150 kids will attend Devoxx4kids on Saturday, September 27, right before JavaOne. Oracle Academy has collaborated with Devoxx4kids to bring a fun and robust agenda. Content will include several workshops on topics such as Greenfoot, Alice, Minecraft Modding, Java, Python, Scratch, Raspberry Pi, Arduino, NAO robot, Lego Mindstorms, and others.

Here are some of the workshops offered: 
Getting Started using Java with Alice
Creating Java Programs with Greenfoot
Lego Mindstorms Programming 4 Kids
Minecraft Modding using Bukkit
Raspberry Pi Gaming 4 Kids
Run your Minecraft Server

If you want to run a programming event for kids, visit Devoxx4kids.org. Free training is available for your own event. Can't make it to JavaOne, attend one of the many Devoxx4Kids events around the world  

Devoxx4Kids the Netherlands, Belgium and Philippines Teaser from Devoxx4Kids on Vimeo.

Thursday Aug 28, 2014

Java and Security at JavaOne

In a Java Magazine interview, Jim Manico (pictured on the right) describes his JavaOne session on security. "I will be speaking about the top coding techniques and essential tools, including several Oracle Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP), Apache, and Google open source Java projects that will help developers build low-risk, high security applications". Jim is an author and educator of developer security-awareness training. You can find more details of his session in JavaOne content catalog

His session is part of a dedicated track about Java and Security, which addresses topics ranging from security tools and coding techniques to innovative products, and includes participation from recognized security leaders discussing policies and best practices. While the value of offensive security techniques is recognized, the focus of this track is primarily on defensive measures. 

Check out all the topics in the Java and Security track 

Monday Aug 25, 2014

JavaOne Hackergarten (and Others Worldwide)

by guest blogger Andres Almiray

It's with great pleasure that I announce JavaOne will host a Hackergarten this year once more. That's right, you did read it well, the name sticks, we're no longer renaming it to CodeGarten like last time ;-)

At JavaOne 2014, the Hackergarten has a dedicated space at the Java Hub in JavaOne exhibit hall, Hilton Union Square. The space has power, a private Internet network, white boards, and seating for 16. Attendees need to bring their laptops. You may stay as long as they want, from less than an hour to most of the three days. The format remains the same as other Hackergartens. Participants will contribute to open source projects. 

The idea is to gather people around specific topics at the scheduled times. Topics range from Java SE, Java EE, JSRs, pretty much anything Java-related. Contributions can be production code, test cases, documentation, or simply a friendly chat in order to gather feedback. If you want to host a session (help people to work on an open source project), please contact me. The project page is here and will be updated as we fill out the schedule.

We are also running Hackergartens at other conferences. The following ones are already confirmed:

JCrete - Aug 25th (in English)

JavaZone - Sep 9th (in Norsk & English)

JMaghreb - Nov 6th (in French)

Learn more about Hackergartens at Hackergarten.net.

Reprinted from The JavaOne Conference Blog. 

Monday Jul 28, 2014

Video: JavaFX with Gerrit Grunwald

Why use JavaFX? What can you do with it that you can't do with Swing? Java Champion, JavaFX community co-lead and JUG Leader Gerrit Grunwald answers these questions and more.

JFXtras: A set of high quality controls and add-ons for JavaFX.

JavaFX Community on Java.net. 

ControlsFX: An open source project that aims to provide really high quality UI controls and other tools to complement the core JavaFX distribution.

Thursday Jul 10, 2014

Technical Article: Leap Motion and JavaFX

In technical article "Leap Motion and JavaFX," Java Champion Johan Vos shows you how to use the Java API in a Java client application to interact with the Leap Motion Controller. 

There might come a day when parents have to explain to their children what a keyboard is.  For example, the Leap Motion Controller is equipped with infrared cameras and infrared LEDs and is capable of tracking hand and finger movements. Fortunately, a Java API is available. "Leap Motion and JavaFX," explores how you can 3-D hand movements to interact with JavaFX applications. See the Leap Motion in action:

This article is reprinted from Java Magazine, a FREE, bi-monthly, online publication. It includes technical articles on the Java language and platform; Java innovations and innovators; JUG and JCP news; Java events; links to online Java communities; and videos and multimedia demos. Subscriptions are free, registration required.

Monday May 19, 2014

JavaFX SceneBuilder 2.0

JavaFX SceneBuilder 2.0 has been released. JavaFX provides a set of graphics and media packages that enables developers to design, create, test, debug, and deploy rich client applications that operate consistently across diverse platforms. New features include Support for new JavaFX 8 UI components, 3D Support, and the ability to add custom GUI components to the Library. You can get a complete list of new features Announcing SceneBuilder 2.0 by Japser Potts.

Learn more about JavaFX.  

JavaFX is now included with the standard JDK and JRE bundles.  Download JDK8

Download Scene Builder 2.0.

Read the Scene Builder User Guide

For news and demos, check out the JavaFX Experience.

Ask questions on the JavaFX Forum.

This video demonstration of JavaFX Scene Builder 2.0 shows how you can make an aeronautical themed demo app, showing how to build layout, apply CSS and connect code.  


Wednesday Mar 26, 2014

Hacking with Raspberry Pi and Java

Two new videos about Raspberry Pi GPIO with Java are now available. This hands-on training  is part of the IoT Developer Challenge and will help you to create a winning project to submit. This is a great opportunity to win a trip to JavaOne 2014! Submissions are accepted until May 30, 2014

In the first video, you will learn about the Raspberry Pi set up and the installation of Java SE Embedded and JavaFX. In the second video below, expert Vinicius Senger explains the Raspberry Pi GPIO and protocols as well as how to use the Pi4J project, a set of libraries enabling the access of the Raspberry Pi with Java. Vinicius also gives several demonstrations using a camera, LED lights, buttons and a relay board to connect to appliances. You can download the code of his demonstrations, including Pi4J Helloworld, PiPicture, Twitter4Pi and Lcdl2C

Friday Mar 14, 2014

Video: Is It a Car? Is It a Computer? No, It’s a Raspberry Pi Java Carputer

Most of us sit inside the Internet of Things without even knowing it. Today's cars have onboard computers that generate lots of data. A self-described "petrol-head," Oracle Technology Evangelist Simon Ritter combined his love of tech with is love of cars to create a simple carputer so he could access the inner workings of his Audi.

For under £100, Ritter was able to connect a Raspberry Pi to his car. He used Java Embedded and JavaFX to build an application to monitor engine performance, throttle position, and G-forces on the car. 

Enjoy his presentation from Q-Con London

and this OTN Community Cast.

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