Wednesday Apr 15, 2015

How to Contribute to the Java Platform

In this interview, Heather Van Cura gave an update about JCP. She mentioned new JSRs for Java EE 8, and Java SE 9, and discussed changed to JCP.next

Community members Simon Maples, Mani Sarkar, and Daniel Bryant pesented a vJUG session about the Adopt OpenJDK project. They describe how to contribute to OpenJDK project. Mani presented a hands-on demo on how to contribute to Java 9  Learn more

Tuesday Apr 07, 2015

Devoxx France 2015

Taking place this week April 8 to 10 in Paris is Devoxx France, one of five Java developer conferences in Europe. The conference is in English and French and all the sessions will be available on Parleys website a couple of weeks after the conference. 

This year, Oracle is a Platinum sponsor. Check out the Oracle Java sessions:  

Java Mission Control for Earthlings
April 9, 15:10 - 16:00
James Weaver, Consulting Member of Technical Staff, Oracle

Java 9 Plan
April 9, 16:35 – 17:25
Brian Goetz, Java Language Architect, Oracle
Paul Sandoz, Software Developer, Oracle

Java EE 7 Batch Processing in the Real World
April 9, 17:40 - 18:30, Neuilly 252 AB
David Delabassee, Software Evangelist, Oracle

Java 8 EE, A Snapshot Overview
April 9, 17:40 - 18:30, Neuilly 252 AB
David Delabassee, Software Evangelist, Oracle

Java EE Birds of Feather Session
April 9, 20:30 – 21:30, Neuilly 252 AB
David Delabassee, Software Evangelist, Oracle

Domotique et Java, Birds of Feather Session
April 9, 21:30 – 22:30, Paris 202-203 Lab
David Delabassee, Software Evangelist, Oracle

Batch API (JSR 352) Hands-on Lab
April 10, 11:00 – 13:50, Paris 224M-225M Lab
David Delabassee, Software Evangelist, Oracle

Project Jigsaw
April 10, 14:05 – 14:55, Maillot
Paul Sandoz, Software Developer, Oracle

IoT, Java, and Autonomous Drones
April 10, 14:05 – 14:55, Room: Amphi Bleu
James Weaver, Consulting Member of Technical Staff, Oracle

Finally, Security API JSR 375
April 10, 15:10 – 16:00, Room: Paris 241
Alex Kosowski, Principal Member of Technical Staff. Oracle

If you attend the conference, please swing by booth #P04 and chat with Java experts who will be onsite answering questions.

Thursday Apr 02, 2015

Updates to the Java Troubleshooting Guide

By Guest Blogger Poonam

Crossed post from: https://blogs.oracle.com/poonam/entry/updates_to_the_java_troubleshooting 

Mattis Castegren who is my manager at Oracle, and is the guest writer for this blog post would like to share some details on the Java Troubleshooting Guide. Here's what he has to say:--

With the release of JDK 8, the official Java Troubleshooting Guide got a big overhaul. All pages were looked over and updated for JDK 8, and the two previous guides for the JVM and for Desktop Technologies were merged into one.

In the last month, with the release of 8u40, we have launched the next phase in this project. In this phase, we have added a lot of chapters about the new supportability tools that have been introduced in Java over the last few years.

The biggest new additions are a set of pages on how to use the Java Flight Recorder (JFR). If you haven't used JFR before, you should definitely check out the following chapters:

2.3 What are Java Flight Recordings

2.4 How to Produce a Flight Recording

2.5 Inspect a Flight Recording

These chapters contain step by step instructions on how to record a JFR and also goes through what to look for in a recording to find common issues. The chapters contain lots of screen shots and details on how to interpret the data.

Once you have learned the basics, you can also look at the following two chapters on how to use JFR to debug specific issues:

3.1 Debug a Memory Leak Using Java Flight Recorder

4 Troubleshoot Performance Issues Using JFR

When you have read through these chapters, you will be ready to use this great tool to find bottle necks in your own application.

Other new additions to the troubleshooting guide is a new chapter on how to set up Java for better troubleshooting: Prepare Java for Troubleshooting, as well as a lot of minor updates and clarifications.


Monday Mar 30, 2015

New Java Champion Martin Thompson

Congratulations to the new Java Champion Martin Thompson 

Martin is a consultant, trainer, and coach specializing in designing high-performance and low-latency systems. In the performance space, he has changed expectations about what is possible with Java by showing that Java can compete with and even outperform native applications. His passions include concurrent programming (the Disruptor being one of his creations) and teaching people how to write algorithms that best utilize modern hardware. He started the Mechanical Sympathy blog and forum, a popular forum of high-performance systems to get guidance for understanding the implications of running their code on modern hardware and for producing code that works in harmony with hardware to be significantly more efficient and robust. Follow Martin on Twitter @mjpt777

Martin is a very active open source contributor. He wrote the initial release of LMAX  Disruptor, an inter thread event processing framework, which won the Duke Choice Award. He also contributed to Aeron, a high throughput, and low latency message transport, surpass native C/C++ implementations by the top commercial vendors in the financial trading space. He contributed to SBE, a message codec that is typically 20X faster than Google Protobufs. 

Martin is a frequent presenter at global conferences. His techniques in high-performance application development have become a standard in every low latency industry and have influenced millions in finance, gaming, and everywhere that high-performance is required.

Monday Mar 23, 2015

Two Live Streaming Java Sessions from vJUG

The vJUG, a virtual Java user group, presents live streaming technical sessions about topics related to Java, JVM, Java EE, Internet of Things and more. Organized by Mani Sarkar and Simon Maple from the London Java Community, their aim is to get the greatest minds and speakers of the Java industry to give talks and presentations in the form of webinars and live streaming from JUG meetups.

First session: How is Java/JVM built?  Tuesday, March 24, 2015 at 14:45 UTC, 15:45 in Germany, 10:45am in New York, 7:45am in San Francisco, and 22:45 in Beijing

Mani Sarkar and Daniel Bryant will give an overview of the Adopt OpenJDK program. They’ll explain why developers should get involved, how to participate, and how front-end developers can take advantage of the Adopt OpenJDK. Watch the session live at http://nighthacking.com/event/javaland-2015/

Second session: What's coming in Java.Next? Wednesday, March 25, 2015 at 14:45 UTC, 15:45 in Germany, 10:45am in New York, 7:45am in San Francisco, and 22:45 in Beijing

Learn from Heather VanCura how you can take part in Java technology by Adopting a JSR. This session give a brief overview of the Adopt-a-JSR program. Andres Almiray will discuss JSR 377, Desktop|Embedded Application API; Anatole Tresch will discuss JSR 354, Money & Currency API; and Ed Burns will discuss the two JSRs he is currently leading, JSR 369, Java Servlet 4.0 Specification and JSR 372, JavaServer Faces (JSF 2.3) Specification.

Two sessions are scheduled for next week. They are live from the JavaLand Conference in Germany, in partnership with the Nighthacking community.  You can watch them online at http://nighthacking.com/event/javaland-2015/  

Tuesday Mar 10, 2015

New Java Champion: Tom Schindl

Congratulations to the new Java Champion Tom Schindl! 

Tom Schindl is an Austrian Java Software developer working on the Eclipse Platform and the JavaFX integration named e(fx)clipse. He's a member of the Eclipse Platform team and part of the team who designed and implemented the Eclipse 4 platform. He is also the CTO of BestSolution, a company specialized in Eclipse and JavaFX consulting for companies around the world.

Tom is a regular speaker at EclipseCon (Europe and NA) and JavaOne where he talks about Eclipse, JavaFX and how to develop modern applications with JavaFX and Eclipse. He authored an SWT prototype which uses JavaFX instead of the native UI-Toolkit. 

Java Champions are an exclusive group of passionate Java technology and community leaders who are community-nominated. Learn more about Java Champions

Tuesday Mar 03, 2015

Announcing Java SE 8 Update 40

Improved performance, scalability and administration in Java SE 8 Update 40 will allow Java developers to innovate faster and improve application services. Here are some features and changes including JavaFX updates: 

JVM Reaction to Memory Pressure: “Memory pressure” is a property that represents the total memory usage (RAM) on the system. This new feature can be leveraged to reduce the amount of memory used on a system where multiple JVMs are deployed and control the amount of memory designated to be consumed by each JVM, avoiding Out of Memory Errors (OOMEs) from occurring.

Improvements to the native packager: Enables developers to create native-feel applications that do not require clients to have an existing Java Runtime installed. These self-contained applications can then be deployed into areas like the Mac app store. The application developer has full control over the runtime and application entry points.

Ability to modernize the JavaFX stack on Mac OS X: The JavaFX media stack has been ported on Mac OS X® from QTKit and Quicktime, which have been deprecated, to the newer AVFoundation framework. With this, developers using the JavaFX media stack can now gain Mac App Store acceptance and have the opportunity to have their applications released on the Mac App Store. 

Nashorn Support: Numerous Nashorn optimizations including support for dynamic languages are incorporated into this release. Also added is a Nashorn Class Filter, which provides fine-grained control over access to Java classes from JavaScript code via a new filtering interface. 

New Time Zone Date Updater Tool: This tool can consume the ‘raw’ time zone data (tzdata) rules from the IANA time zone registry database and convert those to the necessary format required by the JRE. This provides users with the ability to immediately update the JDK/JRE time zone rules with the latest updates from IANA. 

Find out more details in the release notes

Thursday Jan 29, 2015

A Young Woman Innovator Programs with Java

Hania Guiagoussou is a passionate Java developer and a high school student in Dublin, California. She developed a "Water Saver" system to control the water usage in any garden or field. She just won third place and the prize of ten thousand dollars in the Digital Innovative Challenges organized by the ITC/Telecoms  

Q: When did you start programming?

Hania: I started programming at the age of nine. My dad is a computer engineer and he encouraged my brother and me to program. I wasn’t into programming until I went to a Java programming summer workshop at Oracle where I learned object oriented programming using Alice. If it weren't for Alice, I wouldn't be interested in programming. Alice was fun and inspired me to create animation projects. 

Q: What have you been programming lately?

Hania: My last project was a “Water Saver” system. It is an implementation of machine-to-machine communication that optimizes the use of water. I used sensors to capture soil humidity and surrounding temperature. The sensors are connected to a Raspberry Pi from where an intelligent agent collects and analyzes environmental data, then records it in Java objects. I first created the system for a science fair project in Pleasanton California. My  friend and I were going to do a project to study the impact of herbal tea on the human memory. However, returning from school one day after it rained a lot, I saw sprinklers on even though plants and the soil had enough water in the entire neighborhood. At that time the news channels were all talking about water restrictions because of the drought in California. I said to myself “I’ve got the idea for my science fair competition!” 

Q: And you won an award for it...

Hania: Along with my teammate, we received a few awards from the local engineering and science fair in March 2014. We won a special award sponsored by the local utility company and third place in the Computer Science, Maths and Engineering category from over 300 projects. In September 2014, I had an opportunity to compete in an African competition in Chad where I made it to the final round in the Digital Innovative Challenges organized by the ITC/Telecoms and Information Ministries under the sponsorship of the president of Chad and in partnership with the International Telecommunication Organization (ITU). I was the youngest participant in the finals. My project won third place and I won a generous prize of 5 million local francs (around 10 thousand US dollars). 

Q: How would you advise young girls to get started in programming?

Hania: That's a really a good question because girls are not really interested in Computer Science. In my Computer Science and Engineering class, there are only 10 percent girls. I think girls should just play with tools like Alice and create animations using characters and virtual worlds of their choice. I would love to have an opportunity to show girls of my age the satisfaction of programming.

Q: How easy was it for you to get started?

Hania: Before the Alice workshop, I was not interested to go beyond the “Hello, World” application. With Alice I used advanced blocks of codes that were easy to comprehend as I was manipulating real objects using object-oriented programming. I was able to use the Java programming language without knowing I was coding. I had to get introduced in a way that I could embrace, enjoy and innovate.

Q: What do you like about Java?

Hania: I like how you can program it once and it runs on different environments. For example, for the water saver project, the program we created was targeting embedded systems and was tested on Raspberry Pi. But we initially developed the code using NetBeans on a Window PC. We took the same program and ran it on a Linux Operating system on Mac. We then moved the same code to the Raspberry Pi and it runs fine without a single code change. I really like the fact that I can program one time, run on my personal computer then have it working on many other devices. Additionally, creating a client side program using Android to connect the embedded world with our day to day devices was the icing on the cake. I was very happy when from my mobile phone and tablet I launched a standard HTML browser and controlled my application remotely. 

Q: What would you like to do as a career? 

Hania: It has always been my dream to become a doctor. Now, I’d like to pursue medical studies and combine it with tele-medicine to remotely help people in rural areas in developing country where heath-care system is not very developed. I want to become an influential women who can bring positive changes in people’s live. I hope one day to build a bridge between doctors from the U.S., Canada, Europe  in order to help doctors in Africa communicate and exchange experiences with each other and prevent deathly diseases. 


Friday Sep 12, 2014

JavaOne Rockstar Speaker Hendrik Ebbers

In a Java Magazine article, senior Java architect Hendrik Ebbers talks about his JavaOne sessions and JavaOne. "There will be some very cool JavaFX, community, open source and Internet of Things talks this year. The talks are always very professional; I have never experienced a bad one. So don't miss the talks" he explains.   

Hendrik focuses on research and development, Swing, JavaFX, middleware and DevOps. He wrote the book titled "Mastering JavaFX 8 Controls" and will present six JavaOne sessions:   
  • Smart UIs for Mobile and Embedded in JavaFX introduces a new JavaFX theme that is made for embedded devices and will fit perfect in all the cool new Internet of Things and mobile products. 
  • DataFX: From External Data to a UI Flow and Back shows how the different DataFX components make it easy to manage external data by using well-known Java technologies.
  • Enterprise JavaFX, an overview of various best practices for communication between server and client, async background tasks, MVC approaches, and the designing of complex dialogue flows
  • Extreme GUI Makeover.  JavaFX 8, a new UI toolkit, offers a lot of amazing features to help you craft modern-looking and interactive UIs.
  • The JavaFX Community and Ecosystem introduces the JavaFX ecosystem including third-party frameworks and popular knowledge base. It also illustrates the functionality and synergy effects between the libraries with a live coding session. 
  • Test-Driven Development with JavaFX

More about clients and user interface topics here

Monday Sep 08, 2014

Java for the Very Young

Children as young as 10 are learning about programming, robotics, and engineering at JavaOne. 150 kids will attend Devoxx4kids on Saturday, September 27, right before JavaOne. Oracle Academy has collaborated with Devoxx4kids to bring a fun and robust agenda. Content will include several workshops on topics such as Greenfoot, Alice, Minecraft Modding, Java, Python, Scratch, Raspberry Pi, Arduino, NAO robot, Lego Mindstorms, and others.

Here are some of the workshops offered: 
Getting Started using Java with Alice
Creating Java Programs with Greenfoot
Lego Mindstorms Programming 4 Kids
Minecraft Modding using Bukkit
Raspberry Pi Gaming 4 Kids
Run your Minecraft Server

If you want to run a programming event for kids, visit Devoxx4kids.org. Free training is available for your own event. Can't make it to JavaOne, attend one of the many Devoxx4Kids events around the world  

Devoxx4Kids the Netherlands, Belgium and Philippines Teaser from Devoxx4Kids on Vimeo.

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