Wednesday Feb 03, 2016

Medusa: Gauges for JavaFX

Have you ever had a need for a standard gauge control? Gerrit Grunwald has, so he decided to create a library of gauges he calls Medusa. 

In his "Medusa: Gauges for JavaFX" article, he describes the standard gauge his library provides, plus he explains his FGauge control, which enables you to easily embed the Medusa standard gauge into a simple control you create that contains a frame and a background. 

The main idea of Medusa was to enable developers to use one gauge control class that contains all the properties a gauge needs. Grunwald also created several skins and a GaugeBuilder class that lets you easily set gauge parameters. To see examples and learn more, read the article.

Thursday Jan 28, 2016

New Java Champion Hendrik Ebbers

Welcome the new Java Champion Hendrik Ebbers

Hendrik Ebbers is Java Architect at Canoo Engineering AG and lives in Dortmund, Germany. His focus is UI technologies, Middleware and DevOps in addition to research and development. 

Hendrik Ebbers is the founder and leader of the Java User Group Dortmund and gives talks at user groups and international conferences such as JavaOne, Devoxx, JFokus JAX and more. He blogs about UI related topics at www.guigarage.com. He is also a writter for the Java Magazine and a co-creator of JavaFX Ref Card for DZone

Hendrik is one of the lead developers of DataFX that is used in several Java projects. This year Hendrik started the open source project Dolphin Platform. Here Hendrik is one of the lead developers and he is responsible for the JavaEE and Spring integration as well as the JavaFX client part. 

Hendriks JavaFX book "Mastering JavaFX 8 Controls" was released 2014 by Oracle press. Hendrik is JavaOne Rockstar and JSR expert group member. Follow him on Twitter @hendrikEbbers 

Learn more about the Java Champion program

Thursday Dec 17, 2015

Java Books in 2015

Whether you are looking for gifts or plan to catch up on reading over the holidays, there are many Java programming books available. Most of the authors are well-known leaders in the Java Community and famous writers with several programming books under their belts 

Java: The Legend by Ben Evans
Introducing Java 8 by Raoul-Gabriel Urma
Minecraft Modding with Forge by Aditya Gupta, Arun Gupta
Java Programming 24-Hour Trainer, 2nd Edition by Yakov Fain
Pragmatic Unit Testing in Java 8 with JUnit by Jeff Langr, Andy Hunt, Dave Thomas
Beginning Java Programming by Bart Baesens, Aimee Backiel, Seppe vanden Broucke
Java EE 7 Development with NetBeans 8 By David R. Heffelfinger
Functional Programming in Java by Venkat Subramaniam 
JavaFX Essentials by Mohamed Taman

If I missed anything that you wish to recommend, please suggest additional book titles as a comment.

Thursday Dec 03, 2015

Press Your Button for Raspberry Pi

By Guest Blogger Roberto Marquez  

The Raspberry Pi is a great platform for creating your own interactive games.  Recently, I designed an application utilizing an arcade button attached to a GPIO pin.

The game uses Java Standard Edition for Embedded Devices as the implementation platform.  It uses JavaFX APIs and FXML to create the user interface which runs on the screen buffer.  This means no X windowing session is required to run the game on Raspberry Pi.  It also runs on desktops with the latest version of Java 8.

The game is similar to the TV game show ‘Press Your Luck’, but differs in several ways:
  • single or multiplayer (1-3 players)

  • winner is determined by the first player to reach a predetermined score

  • Whammys only remove half the current player's score, and not the whole thing

Here is a video demo:


Here is a wiring diagram of the project:


More assembly instructions and other details are available in the project guide.

Reach out the author:


Tuesday Oct 06, 2015

About the Latest Issue of Java Magazine!

How are engineers changing the way they test applications? This new issue of the Java Magazine focuses on test-driven development. Some companies like Atlassian are moving the quality assurance responsibility entirely to developers.  The advanced features of JUnit, a simple framework to write repeatable tests, can greatly increase developer testing abilities. User interfaces require specialized testing tools; for example, TestFX is designed to test JavaFX applications. Browser based applications can be tested with Selenium against multiple web browser types and versions.

The articles about testing are:

  • Test JavaFX apps with TestFX 
  • Eight Greatly Underused Features of JUnit 
  • Building and Automating a Functional test Grid 
  • Stress Testing Java EE Applications 
  • Think Like a Tester and Get Rid of QA 

In addition, you will find the articles about: 

  • Kotlin: A Low Ceremony, High-Integration Language 
  • Functional Programming in Java 
  • Contexts and Dependency Injection 
  • A First Look at Microservices 
  • More Ideas to Boost Your Developer Career 
The magazine is available for free! 

Thursday Jul 23, 2015

Writing JavaFX Applications for Mobile Devices

Due to recent JavaFX ports, you can now create Java client applications that can be deployed on desktop, laptop, and embedded systems, as well as on mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets. In this Java Magazine recent  article, Johan Vos explores the state of JavaFX on mobile devices, focusing on the Android platform.

As Vos explains, like Java, one of the key benefits of JavaFX is the 'write once, run anywhere' paradigm. Thanks to the JavaFX ports for mobile platforms, you can now package your JavaFX applications for deployment on iOS and Android devices. The runtime environments deal with platform-specific issues, enabling you to focus on application-specific needs.

The article walks through the process of creating an Android package based on JavaFX code. It also discusses how to combine Android-specific code and JavaFX code for those situations when you might need to do so. Also see the website for JavaFXPorts , which is an initiative from the Java Community for coordinating JavaFX porting efforts. Read the article 

Friday May 29, 2015

Writing JavaFX Applications for Mobile Devices

Due to recent JavaFX ports, you can now create Java client applications that can be deployed on desktop, laptop, and embedded systems, as well as on mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets. In this recent Java Magazine article, Johan Vos explores the state of JavaFX on mobile devices, focusing on the Android platform. 

As Vos explains, like Java, one of the key benefits of JavaFX is the write once, run anywhere paradigm. Thanks to the JavaFX ports for mobile platforms, you can now package your JavaFX applications for deployment on iOS and Android devices. The runtime environments deal with platform-specific issues, enabling you to focus on application-specific needs.

The article walks through the process of creating an Android package based on JavaFX code. It also discusses how to combine Android-specific code and JavaFX code for those situations when you might need to do so.

Also see the website for JavaFXPorts, which is an initiative from the Java Community for coordinating JavaFX porting efforts.

Wednesday Apr 15, 2015

How to Contribute to the Java Platform

In this interview, Heather Van Cura gave an update about JCP. She mentioned new JSRs for Java EE 8, and Java SE 9, and discussed changed to JCP.next

Community members Simon Maples, Mani Sarkar, and Daniel Bryant pesented a vJUG session about the Adopt OpenJDK project. They describe how to contribute to OpenJDK project. Mani presented a hands-on demo on how to contribute to Java 9  Learn more

Tuesday Apr 07, 2015

Devoxx France 2015

Taking place this week April 8 to 10 in Paris is Devoxx France, one of five Java developer conferences in Europe. The conference is in English and French and all the sessions will be available on Parleys website a couple of weeks after the conference. 

This year, Oracle is a Platinum sponsor. Check out the Oracle Java sessions:  

Java Mission Control for Earthlings
April 9, 15:10 - 16:00
James Weaver, Consulting Member of Technical Staff, Oracle

Java 9 Plan
April 9, 16:35 – 17:25
Brian Goetz, Java Language Architect, Oracle
Paul Sandoz, Software Developer, Oracle

Java EE 7 Batch Processing in the Real World
April 9, 17:40 - 18:30, Neuilly 252 AB
David Delabassee, Software Evangelist, Oracle

Java 8 EE, A Snapshot Overview
April 9, 17:40 - 18:30, Neuilly 252 AB
David Delabassee, Software Evangelist, Oracle

Java EE Birds of Feather Session
April 9, 20:30 – 21:30, Neuilly 252 AB
David Delabassee, Software Evangelist, Oracle

Domotique et Java, Birds of Feather Session
April 9, 21:30 – 22:30, Paris 202-203 Lab
David Delabassee, Software Evangelist, Oracle

Batch API (JSR 352) Hands-on Lab
April 10, 11:00 – 13:50, Paris 224M-225M Lab
David Delabassee, Software Evangelist, Oracle

Project Jigsaw
April 10, 14:05 – 14:55, Maillot
Paul Sandoz, Software Developer, Oracle

IoT, Java, and Autonomous Drones
April 10, 14:05 – 14:55, Room: Amphi Bleu
James Weaver, Consulting Member of Technical Staff, Oracle

Finally, Security API JSR 375
April 10, 15:10 – 16:00, Room: Paris 241
Alex Kosowski, Principal Member of Technical Staff. Oracle

If you attend the conference, please swing by booth #P04 and chat with Java experts who will be onsite answering questions.

Thursday Apr 02, 2015

Updates to the Java Troubleshooting Guide

By Guest Blogger Poonam

Crossed post from: https://blogs.oracle.com/poonam/entry/updates_to_the_java_troubleshooting 

Mattis Castegren who is my manager at Oracle, and is the guest writer for this blog post would like to share some details on the Java Troubleshooting Guide. Here's what he has to say:--

With the release of JDK 8, the official Java Troubleshooting Guide got a big overhaul. All pages were looked over and updated for JDK 8, and the two previous guides for the JVM and for Desktop Technologies were merged into one.

In the last month, with the release of 8u40, we have launched the next phase in this project. In this phase, we have added a lot of chapters about the new supportability tools that have been introduced in Java over the last few years.

The biggest new additions are a set of pages on how to use the Java Flight Recorder (JFR). If you haven't used JFR before, you should definitely check out the following chapters:

2.3 What are Java Flight Recordings

2.4 How to Produce a Flight Recording

2.5 Inspect a Flight Recording

These chapters contain step by step instructions on how to record a JFR and also goes through what to look for in a recording to find common issues. The chapters contain lots of screen shots and details on how to interpret the data.

Once you have learned the basics, you can also look at the following two chapters on how to use JFR to debug specific issues:

3.1 Debug a Memory Leak Using Java Flight Recorder

4 Troubleshoot Performance Issues Using JFR

When you have read through these chapters, you will be ready to use this great tool to find bottle necks in your own application.

Other new additions to the troubleshooting guide is a new chapter on how to set up Java for better troubleshooting: Prepare Java for Troubleshooting, as well as a lot of minor updates and clarifications.


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