Thursday Nov 14, 2013

Video: Richard Bair on Java and the Internet of Things, Lambdas and more

Richard Bair, Client Java Architect, discusses Java and the Internet of Things, JavaFX, Lambdas and more. Video, from the Devoxx conference:

Wednesday Nov 13, 2013

Rainbows and Unicorns at the Devoxx OTN Hack Fest

At the OTN Hack Fest at Devoxx, several developers did their first "hello world" with the Internet of Things (IoT). They had fun and built basic applications with Java Embedded, Raspberry Pi and Leap Motion controllers. Experts Yara & Vinicius Senger and Geert Bevin provided the basics and support. Senior Developer from ZeroTurnaround Geert Bevin did a bit of hacking too. Check out this video to see what he came up with in an hour:


Learn more about Java Embedded at the Oracle Technology Network

Wednesday Oct 02, 2013

Video: Java Powers the Smart Home

How much control do you want to have over everything in your home? With Java, you can control lights, cameras and appliances easily. You can even determine when to run the washing machine based on the cost of power! In this video, Engineer Volker Bauche shows Java powering sensors around a smart home. From the DEMOgrounds of JavaOne 2013, by Tori Wieldt.

Learn more about the Java and the Internet of Things on the Oracle Technology Network.

Wednesday Sep 25, 2013

Java in Action at JavaOne: The People Counter

There's a lot of action at JavaOne, lots of movement. We've got robots, cars, door sensors, apps in the cloud and more. In this video, Architect Oleg Kostukovsky describes the People Counter, a combination of sensors, gateways, a database in the cloud, and a JavaFX UI which provides real time data on people movement.

Thursday Apr 18, 2013

Getting Started with Oracle Java ME Embedded 3.3 on the Keil Evaluation Board

The new release this week of Oracle Java ME Embedded 3.3 for ARM Cortex M3 make the Oracle Java ME Embedded product available as a reference binary for the Keil MCBSTM32F200 platform for development/evaluation purposes. This binary comes integrated with RTX OS. To help you get up and running, Oracle Java Evangelist Angela Caicedo has created a new two part video that shows you all the steps you need to follow to develop your first applications using Java ME Embedded 3.3 on the Keil evaluation board.

Video: Getting Started with Java ME Embedded 3.3 Part One


   Part I

This new tutorial video provides the step-by-step guide to get Oracle Java ME Embedded for ARM Cortex M3 up and running on the on Keil evaluation board: from the configuration of the software and hardware, and how to    test; how to connect to the command line and logging interfaces; and of course how to get started with this Java ME Embedded application. Angela walks us through how to install, update and even uninstall the application.


Video: Getting Started with Java ME Embedded 3.3 Part Two


Part Two

In the second video, Caicedo uses Netbeans 7.3 with Oracle Java ME SDK 3.3 NetBeans Plugin, Java ME SDK 3.3 (early access) and the Oracle Java ME Embedded 3.3 for ARM Cortex M3/RTX software distribution to create an embedded application, run it on an emulator and provides tips on how you can debug your application. Then using these tools you will be taken through the steps to create your first application, deploy it, and test that everything is running properly.

Oracle Java ME Embedded 3.3 complete product functionality such as peripheral IO, AMS operations, headless operations, functionality for remote application management/configurability, etc. is available on the Keil MCBSTM32F200 platform. Download and see the documentation on OTN to learn more.

Tuesday Mar 19, 2013

Java Shows Off at Embedded World

James Allen of Oracle's Global Market Development Group shows some of the examples of how Java can work from devices to the data center. With the explosion of the Machine-to-Machine (M2M) space, thousands of smart devices will be connected to each other and to a data collector. See how Java is scalable, can run on devices, the middle tier, and the backend. From the floor of Embedded World 2013.

Learn more about Java Embedded:

Thursday Mar 14, 2013

Early Access Release of Oracle Java ME Embedded 3.3 for the Raspberry Pi and Java ME SDK 3.3 now available

Oracle has announced Early Access releases for Java ME Embedded 3.3 and the Java ME Software Development Kit (SDK) 3.3. This release provides an early access version of the reference binary for the Raspberry Pi, and is available on the Oracle Technology Network. Developers can start testing out the new features and functionality in the first complete Java runtime client optimized for ARM architecture connected microcontrollers and other resource-constrained devices--for just $35! The early access release of the Java ME SDK 3.3 adds support for embedded development on all the same supported platforms as Java ME Embedded 3.3, as well as full featured plug-ins for Netbeans and Eclipse. These releases provide everything a developer needs to get up and running quickly and easily in the small embedded world.

Java ME Embedded 3.3 is available as an early access release for Raspberry Pi (Model B) development board (for ARM11, Linux). This early access version of the product is available as a reference binary that is ready to install and run on the target development board. There is a rich set of peripheral IO APIs that make it possible to access a variety of different devices. Please send us your your feedback from testing this early access release. Tell us/show us what you are doing with small embedded devices and Java! (Ed Note: You can submit a video URL for the Java YouTube channel to otnfeedback_usAToracleDOTcom.) Additional functionality includes:

  • the ability to monitor application memory status and network traffic at runtime.
  • logging enhancements so you can better filter and customize edge data collected by your target device.
  • build configurability to simplify right-sizing of stack at build time for small devices.

Java ME Software Development Kit (SDK) 3.3 provides a complete development and debugging environment for Java ME applications, now including support for embedded development on several platforms, including Windows 7. This release provides a device abstraction layer for your development environment via the SDK, on-device development with the Raspberry Pi, and new device emulators.

To get started, you can watch this video by Java Evangelist Simon Ritter "Getting Started with Oracle Java ME Embedded and Raspberry Pi"

Download Java ME Embedded 3.3
Download Java ME Software Development Kit (SDK) 3.3

Thursday Feb 28, 2013

Java in the Internet of Things

In this video, I talk to Product Manager for Small Embedded Java Terrence Barr at Embedded World. He gave presentations that included the slide that said "Stop Reinventing the Plumbing." I asked him what that means:

Java already has the connectivity, manageability, interoperability, and back-end integration you need for apps, so you can concentrate on your area of expertise, your "value add" on top of that plumbing. Java -- saving the world, one developer, one sensor at a time. ;-)

Wednesday Feb 27, 2013

mHealth Powered by Java

toriwires
Yours Truly Generating Data

Ever pay to have someone watch you sleep? I have. It's not as kinky as it sounds; because of my loud snoring, my spouse insisted I get a sleep study. There I was, in a room with a camera, hooked up to a diagnostic sleep system. I had sensors attached to my head, neck, legs and chest. I even had an ET finger that glowed red (a sensor using light to determine how much oxygen was in my blood). And what was I thinking about as I drifted off to sleep? The data I was generating! Where was it going? What format was it in? Who wrote the app?

There is lots of data being generated by medical devices currently, and much, much more to come. The number of mobile connected devices is expected to increase by 100% to nearly 12 billion by 2020; resulting in a market opportunity of $1.2 trillion. Now what? Where does the data go? What format does the data need to be in? Will developers have to write an different app for every device manufacturer? Java to the rescue! Manfred Kube, Director of Business Development, mHealth, for Gemalto Systems explains, "Through the power of Java, we are enabling medical devices to  connect to cloud in a standard-based, interoperable fashion, and avoid the silos that are common today." See how Java makes it easy to get started and be successful in mHealth:


The GMSA supports standards throughout the mobile world, and is taking the lead in M2M standards. To accelerate and simplify mobile health application development, the GMSA is partnering with the Continua Health Alliance, whose mission is to developing design guidelines that will enable vendors to build interoperable sensors, home networks, telehealth platforms, and health and wellness services. Orange Telecomm This demo included connection to the cellular network with help from Orange Telecom. Learn more about Gemalto and Java at Gemalto.com/m2m

Monday Feb 25, 2013

Java Save Lives at Mobile World Congress

Mobile World Congress used to just be about mobile phones and the industry around mobile networks. Now "mobile" has redefined itself and is about sensors everywhere: cars, scooters, buildings, people, etc. The M2M (or "Internet of Everything") revolution is here, with mobile phones as just one of the many components that create an intelligent, connected world. As the mobile industry moves its focus from voice to data, developers now have the entire world as a potential for apps. The world is literally your oyster (sorry, had to).

With all this opportunity comes decisions to make. Todays' developers have a wide range of choices in terms of what device they are going to use and how to control it. How smart is the device? Do you want it to be tailored and tuned to a specific solution or something more broad? How do you get the data from the device to the data center? The device and platform you choice are key components for a successful implementation. Java has been on devices for a long time: smart cards, cars, ATMs, phones, underwater probes, and more. Java enables devices to be intelligent, scalable and supportable. Want to update a device remotely? Done. Want it to be headless? Done. Want a remote sensor on your grandmother that calls the hospital if she falls, and also lets the paramedics open the door to her house? Done. Here's video that shows Java saving grandma's life at Mobile World Congress:

If you are at MWC, drop by the Oracle booth and learn more. You also have a shot at winning a Raspberry Pi at WIPJam @ MWC 2013 event for mobile developers Thursday evening. See how Oracle and Deutsche Telekom have made it possible to make your coffee by phone, by combining a coffee machine, a Raspberry Pi, Java SE and the Deutsche Telekom network. M2M can deliver your favorite brew (and programming language and platform)!

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