Tuesday May 03, 2016

Java SE 8 Certification

Prepare for the Java SE 8 exam or upgrade your certification from any previous Java SE to Java SE 8.  There are resources available, whether you are getting a certification for the first time or want to upgrade your certification.

Upgrade Java SE 7 to Java SE 8 OCP Programmer | 1Z0-810
Recommended Training: Java SE 8 New Features

Upgrade to Java SE 8 OCP (Java SE 6 and all prior versions) | 1Z0-813
Exam Topics: Upgrade to Java SE 8 OCP (Java SE 6 and all prior versions)

More about Certification:



Thursday Apr 28, 2016

Tips and Tricks for Better Applications

How to take full advantage of Java EE and Java SE features in your web applications. In this presentation, David Blevins discussed the topic of extensibility with CDI, CDI Scopes and EJB. He explains how to use scopes in CDI, and add your own Bean types. He shows scope samples you can download and basic classes for making your own scopes. In the second part of his presentation, he explains the new Java 8 features and how to leverage them for your Java EE applications. Watch his presentation. 

Tuesday Apr 26, 2016

New Java Champion Pratik Patel

Welcome New Java Champion Pratik Patel


Pratik Patel is a long time Java expert, advocate and community organizer. While working as a graduate student at the University of North Carolina’s SunSITE research lab (which was sponsored by Sun Microsystems), he learned about Java and was immediately hooked by the potential of the platform and the language. That year, in 1996, he co-authored the 2nd book on Java. The following year, he wrote the first book on enterprise Java. He went on to implement large-scale Java based systems in investment banking, health-care and telco in various places in the world including New York, London, and Hong Kong.

Starting in 2005, Pratik became involved with the Atlanta Java User’s Group (AJUG), and later became a board member. His work in bringing the world’s experts on Java technology to Atlanta have helped make DevNexus one of the largest community run Java centric conferences in the world. Around the same time, he started to share his deep knowledge of Java and the JVM to developers in the USA and around the world. He is a frequent speaker at the No Fluff Just Stuff tour and other Java-centric conferences. He also is the primary organizer of DevNexusJr, a venture that is part of AJUG to bring the joy of programming to the next generation of developers. Follow him at @prpatel

The Java Champions are an exclusive group of passionate Java technology and community leaders who are community-nominated and selected under a project sponsored by Oracle. Learn more about Java Champions


Thursday Apr 14, 2016

2016 JavaOne Call for Papers Open

Join the premier Java conference in San Francisco as a speaker. This year JavaOne will take place from September 18th to 22nd, 2016. Speakers on accepted submissions will receive a complimentary pass with access to all conference sessions. Submit a proposal today in one of the conference tracks: 

  • Core Java Platform
  • Emerging Languages
  • Java, Cloud, and Server-Side Development
  • Java and Devices
  • Java Clients and User Interfaces
  • Java Development Tools
  • Java, DevOps, and Methodologies
Make sure to check out the general tips before submitting your proposals General Tips

Wednesday Apr 13, 2016

Humanoid Robot Programming with Java

“The Nao Robot can play soccer and compete for RobotCup with its cameras tracking the ball and field movements” explains Nicolas Rigaud community manager at Aldebaran Robotics. Watch this interview where Nicolas explains the Nao’s hardware.

Monday Apr 11, 2016

Java Magazine March/April Issue

By Java Magazine Editor Andrew Binstock

Welcome to the March/April issue of Java Magazine in which we dig into the inner workings of Java and the JVM. This issue is pure nerd-stim: bits and bytes have never been as much fun as exploring how the JVM manages garbage collectors and code caches. All good developers are mindful of how their code executes, but due to constant advances in the language and the JVM, knowing what's going on behind the scenes is not always easy.

So, let's dig in. We start by looking into the fundamentals of just-in-time (JIT) compilation in the JVM, we compare the performance of different garbage collectors, and then we update an article on the JVM's code cache and its effects on performance. To these, we add deep dives into how Java itself works: how annotations are handled and how to write your own annotations; plus we examine how the Java Collections Framework was optimized using laziness, which is a technique that is available to you in your code.

The rest of the issue shows off Golo, a new JVM language; better persistence in Java EE; and how enums work in Java--all topped off by our famous language quiz, our no-holds-barred book review, and my editorial, which discusses a new proposal by the Java team to add greater type inference to the language. Enjoy! 

Read this new edition of the Java Magazine


Wednesday Mar 30, 2016

Last Interactive Online Java Webinar with Q&A

 The Virtual Technology Summit (VTS) delivers interactive Java technical content from Java Champions and Oracle experts to your desk.  

The interactive, online event, is sponsored by the Oracle Technology Network (OTN). The April 5 event is the last one in this VTS series. It features six Java technical sessions about Java EE, cloud, and Java SE API. Register now

The Java Track includes three code-heavy sessions:

Java on Mobile: Thanks to innovations in mobile JVM's and the availability of JavaFX on iOS and Android, it is now possible to write applications once (in Java) and deploy them on the major mobile platforms. In this session, we will show how easy it is to create a highly-polished Material Design Java application, and to deploy it on an Android device and an iOS device with exactly the same code used in both deployments.

Asynchronous programming in Java 8: how to use CompletableFuture: This presentation aims to explain how the patterns introduced by this interface and its implementing class are new to the Java platform, and how they fill the gap in the old Future patterns.The different models are precisely presented: how to create complex asynchronous processing pipelines, how to deal with exceptions, how to test complex code. 

Down-to-Earth Microservices with Java EE: the session explores microservices using a simple but representative example using Java EE. You'll see how the Java EE programming model and APIs like JAX-RS, WebSocket, JSON-P, Bean Validation, CDI, JPA, EJB 3, JMS 2 and JTA aligns with the concept of microservices.

Java SE 8 for Java EE Developers: Java SE 8 brings a bounty of improvements. In this session, you will learn about Lambda expressions, a new Date and Time API, the Streams API, Completable Futures, Nashorn, Repeatable Annotations, String joiners, etc.

Thinking Beyond ORM in JPA:  This session discusses native-query support in JPA along with stored procedures and result set mappings in JPA 2.1. The presented code samples illustrate the details of the API, highlighting their strengths and weaknesses. Our analysis reveals applicable use cases and most popular approaches. The summary provides guidelines on how and when to utilize native queries.

Visualizing Data in the Cloud with Oracle JET: Oracle JET is a free and open source toolkit, providing a solid basis for enterprise JavaScript applications, including built-in solutions for accessibility, modularity, and data visualization. In this code-driven session, you will learn everything you need to know to create maintainable enterprise applications in JavaScript!

Tuesday Mar 29, 2016

Moving to Garbage First

Garbage First (G1) is likely to become the default collector in Java 9. In this presentation, Kirk Pepperdine shows different case studies on how to use the G1 with your applications. He also demonstrates tips and tricks to work around some of the hiccups.


In this interview, Kirk Pepperdine shows his Censum performance diagnostics tool from jClarity and describes the state of G1 GC


Waste Management in JDK 9

“Instead of a simple garbage collector to free up memory, Garbage First (G1) takes the role of a waste management consultant: freeing unused memory and identifying ways to reduce the overall amount of garbage.” explains Eric Costlow in a new blog


Costlow demonstrates how string Deduplication can significantly decrease heap usage. Using the Eclipse IDE, he runs a performance test using Java Flight Recorder to benchmark the results.

Monday Mar 28, 2016

Module System in JDK 9

From original blog post by Mark Reinhold

The module system (JSR 376 and JEP 261), was integrated into JDK 9 last week and is now available for testing in early-access build 111.

Project Jigsaw is an enormous effort, encompassing six JEPs implemented by dozens of engineers over many years. So far we’ve defined a modular structure for the JDK (JEP 200), reorganized the source code according to that structure (JEP 201), and restructured the JDK and JRE run-time images to support modules (JEP 220).

Like the previous major change, the introduction of modular run-time images, the introduction of the module system might impact you even if you don’t make direct use of it. That’s because the module system is now fully operative at both compile time and run time, at least for the modules comprising the JDK itself. Most of the JDK’s internal APIs are, as a consequence, fully encapsulated and hence, by default, inaccessible to code outside of the JDK.

An existing application that uses only standard Java SE APIs and runs on JDK 8 should just work, as they say, on JDK 9. If, however, your application uses a JDK-internal API, or uses a library or framework that does so, then it’s likely to fail. In many cases you can work around this via the -XaddExports option of the javac and java commands. If, e.g., your application uses the internal sun.security.x509.X500Name class then you can enable access to it via the option

-XaddExports:java.base/sun.security.x509=ALL-UNNAMED 

This causes all members of the sun.security.x509 package in the java.base module to be exported to the special unnamed module in which classes from the class path are defined.

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