Monday Feb 08, 2016

Security Alert Released

Oracle released Security Alert CVE-2016-0603 to address a vulnerability that can be exploited when installing Java 6, 7 or 8 on the Windows platform. This vulnerability has received a CVSS Base Score of 7.6.

To be successfully exploited, this vulnerability requires that an unsuspecting user be tricked into visiting a malicious web site and download files to the user's system before installing Java 6, 7 or 8. Though considered relatively complex to exploit, this vulnerability may result, if successfully exploited, in a complete compromise of the unsuspecting user’s system.

Because the exposure exists only during the installation process, users need not upgrade existing Java installations to address the vulnerability. However, Java users who have downloaded any old version of Java prior to 6u113, 7u97 or 8u73, should discard these old downloads and replace them with 6u113, 7u97 or 8u73 or later.

As a reminder, Oracle recommends that Java home users visit Java.com to ensure that they are running the most recent version of Java SE and that all older versions of Java SE have been completely removed. Oracle further advises against downloading Java from sites other than Java.com as these sites may be malicious

For more information, check out the Security Alert CVE-2016-0603

Wednesday Feb 03, 2016

Medusa: Gauges for JavaFX

Have you ever had a need for a standard gauge control? Gerrit Grunwald has, so he decided to create a library of gauges he calls Medusa. 

In his "Medusa: Gauges for JavaFX" article, he describes the standard gauge his library provides, plus he explains his FGauge control, which enables you to easily embed the Medusa standard gauge into a simple control you create that contains a frame and a background. 

The main idea of Medusa was to enable developers to use one gauge control class that contains all the properties a gauge needs. Grunwald also created several skins and a GaugeBuilder class that lets you easily set gauge parameters. To see examples and learn more, read the article.

Thursday Jan 21, 2016

Java 8 Streams API

Are you effectively using Java SE 8 streams for data processing? Introduced in Java 8, streams allow you to process data in a declarative way and leverage multi-core architectures without writing multithread code. 

Watch two JavaOne 2015 sessions about streams. Paul Sandoz presented the ‘Effective Java Stream’ session, where he discusses tips and tricks, effective parallel execution and what to expect in Java 9 and beyond. 

Brian Goetz and Stuart Marks from the Java Platform group presented the ‘API Design with Java 8 Lambdas and Streams’ session. They discussed the design of lambdas and streams, lessons learned, as well as when and why to use specific APIs. Stuart explained the design of streams, the difference between collections and streams and how to best use them.  



Watch additional JavaOne 2015 sessions

Tuesday Jan 19, 2016

New Release JDK 8u71 and JDK 8u72

JDK 8u71 and 8u72, two new Java 8 updates are now available. Oracle strongly recommends that most Java SE users upgrade to the latest Java 8u71 CPU release, which includes important security fixes. Java SE 8u72 is a patch-set update, including all of 8u71 plus additional features. You can download the latest JDK releases from Java SE Downloads page. 

For information on new features and bug fixes included in these releases, see the following release notes: 


Check out Java CPU and PSU Releases Explained for more details 

Wednesday Jan 13, 2016

Optionals: Patterns and Good Practices

Interested in learning about elegant patterns that provide new ways to handle corner cases for data processing pipelines?

In this article, José Paumard explores several patterns that use Optional, a new Java SE 8 final class with a private constructor. This class provides alternatives for writing data processing pipelines built on streams, resulting in better and more-fluent code.

Paumard describes how to build optionals, explains why we need them, and demonstrates several patterns you can use in various scenarios. The first patterns use an optional as a wrapper object, which may or not have a value. The second patterns expose methods of the optional class. 

To learn more, read the article.

Thursday Jan 07, 2016

New Java Champion José Paumard

Congratulations to the new Java Champion: José Paumard!

José is an assistant professor at the Institut Galilée (Université Paris 13), PhD in applied mathematics from the ENS de Cachan. He has also worked as one of the lead members of the Paris JUG for 6 years, and is a co-founder of Devoxx France.

As a member of the CDI 2.0 Expert Group, he has contributed new ways of handling events, especially in the asynchronous part of the spec. He provided new patterns that have been adopted by the EG. 

José has been working as an independent programmer for 20 years and is a well-known Java / Java EE / software craftsmanship expert and trainer. His expertise includes Tomcat, JBoss, Weblogic, Websphere, Glassfish, and the most popular Java EE parts: JPA (Hibernate & Eclipselink), EJB (including version 2), JMS, JTA, the Web tier, and more.  

José speaks at conferences, including JavaOne and Devoxx; and writes technical articles for various publications including Java Magazine and Oracle Technology Network. Passionate about education, he publishes MOOC for several companies: Oracle Virtual Technology Summit, Pluralsight, Microsoft Virtual Academy and Voxxed.

His blog: blog.paumard.org/en/ Follow him @josepaumard

Java champions are an exclusive group of passionate Java technologists and community leaders who are community-nominated. Learn more about Java Champions

Thursday Dec 17, 2015

Java Books in 2015

Whether you are looking for gifts or plan to catch up on reading over the holidays, there are many Java programming books available. Most of the authors are well-known leaders in the Java Community and famous writers with several programming books under their belts 

Java: The Legend by Ben Evans
Introducing Java 8 by Raoul-Gabriel Urma
Minecraft Modding with Forge by Aditya Gupta, Arun Gupta
Java Programming 24-Hour Trainer, 2nd Edition by Yakov Fain
Pragmatic Unit Testing in Java 8 with JUnit by Jeff Langr, Andy Hunt, Dave Thomas
Beginning Java Programming by Bart Baesens, Aimee Backiel, Seppe vanden Broucke
Java EE 7 Development with NetBeans 8 By David R. Heffelfinger
Functional Programming in Java by Venkat Subramaniam 
JavaFX Essentials by Mohamed Taman

If I missed anything that you wish to recommend, please suggest additional book titles as a comment.

Thursday Dec 10, 2015

Certification Discount ends December 31

Get 20% off any Java certification exam until December 31! Don’t miss this great opportunity to get Java certified and show off your credentials. 

How to get started 

1. Find the Java exam that meets your skill level and experience.
2. Review exam preparation and topics.
3. Register at Pearson VUE. Use promotion code Java20 to receive the 20% discount.

This globally available offer is open until December 31, 2015. 


Thursday Dec 03, 2015

Press Your Button for Raspberry Pi

By Guest Blogger Roberto Marquez  

The Raspberry Pi is a great platform for creating your own interactive games.  Recently, I designed an application utilizing an arcade button attached to a GPIO pin.

The game uses Java Standard Edition for Embedded Devices as the implementation platform.  It uses JavaFX APIs and FXML to create the user interface which runs on the screen buffer.  This means no X windowing session is required to run the game on Raspberry Pi.  It also runs on desktops with the latest version of Java 8.

The game is similar to the TV game show ‘Press Your Luck’, but differs in several ways:
  • single or multiplayer (1-3 players)

  • winner is determined by the first player to reach a predetermined score

  • Whammys only remove half the current player's score, and not the whole thing

Here is a video demo:


Here is a wiring diagram of the project:


More assembly instructions and other details are available in the project guide.

Reach out the author:


Thursday Nov 12, 2015

Java ME 8 + Raspberry Pi + Sensors=IoT World

This is the fourth article about how to create an application with Raspberry Pi and Java ME 8.  Jose Cruz explains in detail how you can develop Java ME 8 classes that allow you to gather data and control these devices. It focuses on using a serial peripheral interface (SPI) bus to control an analog-to-digital converter (ADC), a ferroelectric RAM (FRAM), and an organic light-emitting diode (OLED) display. 

In Part 1 of his series on using Java ME 8 to control Internet of Things (IOT) devices--such as LEDs, relays, LCDs, sensors, motors, and switches--connected to a Raspberry Pi, Jose Cruz explains how to work with devices that use a simple general-purpose input/output (GPIO) interface. GPIO devices can be used as either a digital input or digital output, can be disabled or enabled, and can be used to drive interrupt lines. Part 1 explores how to connect and control a flame sensor, a movement sensor, and a motion sensor.

In Part 2, Cruz describes how to connect and control devices that use an inter-integrated circuit bus (I2C) interface. Then in Part 3, he demonstrated how to use universal asynchronous receiver/transmitter (UART) interfaces to connect devices that read latitude, longitude, altitude, and time from a GPS receiver engine board and provide the information via spoken voice in English and Spanish.
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