Thursday Jan 29, 2015

A Young Woman Innovator Programs with Java

Hania Guiagoussou is a passionate Java developer and a high school student in Dublin, California. She developed a "Water Saver" system to control the water usage in any garden or field. She just won third place and the prize of ten thousand dollars in the Digital Innovative Challenges organized by the ITC/Telecoms  

Q: When did you start programming?

Hania: I started programming at the age of nine. My dad is a computer engineer and he encouraged my brother and me to program. I wasn’t into programming until I went to a Java programming summer workshop at Oracle where I learned object oriented programming using Alice. If it weren't for Alice, I wouldn't be interested in programming. Alice was fun and inspired me to create animation projects. 

Q: What have you been programming lately?

Hania: My last project was a “Water Saver” system. It is an implementation of machine-to-machine communication that optimizes the use of water. I used sensors to capture soil humidity and surrounding temperature. The sensors are connected to a Raspberry Pi from where an intelligent agent collects and analyzes environmental data, then records it in Java objects. I first created the system for a science fair project in Pleasanton California. My  friend and I were going to do a project to study the impact of herbal tea on the human memory. However, returning from school one day after it rained a lot, I saw sprinklers on even though plants and the soil had enough water in the entire neighborhood. At that time the news channels were all talking about water restrictions because of the drought in California. I said to myself “I’ve got the idea for my science fair competition!” 

Q: And you won an award for it...

Hania: Along with my teammate, we received a few awards from the local engineering and science fair in March 2014. We won a special award sponsored by the local utility company and third place in the Computer Science, Maths and Engineering category from over 300 projects. In September 2014, I had an opportunity to compete in an African competition in Chad where I made it to the final round in the Digital Innovative Challenges organized by the ITC/Telecoms and Information Ministries under the sponsorship of the president of Chad and in partnership with the International Telecommunication Organization (ITU). I was the youngest participant in the finals. My project won third place and I won a generous prize of 5 million local francs (around 10 thousand US dollars). 

Q: How would you advise young girls to get started in programming?

Hania: That's a really a good question because girls are not really interested in Computer Science. In my Computer Science and Engineering class, there are only 10 percent girls. I think girls should just play with tools like Alice and create animations using characters and virtual worlds of their choice. I would love to have an opportunity to show girls of my age the satisfaction of programming.

Q: How easy was it for you to get started?

Hania: Before the Alice workshop, I was not interested to go beyond the “Hello, World” application. With Alice I used advanced blocks of codes that were easy to comprehend as I was manipulating real objects using object-oriented programming. I was able to use the Java programming language without knowing I was coding. I had to get introduced in a way that I could embrace, enjoy and innovate.

Q: What do you like about Java?

Hania: I like how you can program it once and it runs on different environments. For example, for the water saver project, the program we created was targeting embedded systems and was tested on Raspberry Pi. But we initially developed the code using NetBeans on a Window PC. We took the same program and ran it on a Linux Operating system on Mac. We then moved the same code to the Raspberry Pi and it runs fine without a single code change. I really like the fact that I can program one time, run on my personal computer then have it working on many other devices. Additionally, creating a client side program using Android to connect the embedded world with our day to day devices was the icing on the cake. I was very happy when from my mobile phone and tablet I launched a standard HTML browser and controlled my application remotely. 

Q: What would you like to do as a career? 

Hania: It has always been my dream to become a doctor. Now, I’d like to pursue medical studies and combine it with tele-medicine to remotely help people in rural areas in developing country where heath-care system is not very developed. I want to become an influential women who can bring positive changes in people’s live. I hope one day to build a bridge between doctors from the U.S., Canada, Europe  in order to help doctors in Africa communicate and exchange experiences with each other and prevent deathly diseases. 


Thursday Jun 20, 2013

Submit your Nominations for 2013 Duke's Choice Awards

The 2013 Duke's Choice Award program is now accepting nominations through July 22nd. The Duke's Choice Awards celebrate innovation in the world of Java technology, and are granted to individuals, organizations and businesses for their compelling use of Java technology. Anyone can now submit a nomination online.

Innovators in Java have received the Duke's Choice Awards for over 10 years. Last year's Duke's Choice Awards winners are featured on Java.net/dukeschoice.

Winners will be announced at JavaOne 2013 in San Francisco. In addition to the Duke Choice Award statue, each winner will receive a full JavaOne SF conference pass and recognition in Java Magazine, The Java Source Blog, and Oracle's Java Developer Newsletter.

Even if you are not submitting this year, help us spread the word by hosting the banner on your website or blog.

Wednesday Mar 06, 2013

Get started with Java!

Every year, the Java platform is growing with new features for enterprise, web, embedded and mobile application and developers. To help beginners navigate the platform and get started with Java technologies, new learning resources are available on the New to Java website. Developers will write a "Hello World" application, test their Java knowledge,  create user interfaces with JavaFX, and build enterprise applications with Java EE, desktop applications with Java SE or applications for mobile and embedded devices.  

Being up to date about current trends and networking with other developers are also critical for a career in programming. Developers can connect with top leaders in the community at conferences and community networks such as local user groups. They have the chance to contribute to open-source projects such as OpenJDK and Adopt-a-JSR to name just two.

Finally, parents and educators teaching programming to children will find software tools for young developers. They are free downloadable development tools with easy to use interfaces for young students. And Minecraft is so popular! Java technologist Daniel Green walks us through Minecraft mods with Java.

Tuesday Dec 11, 2012

Call for Papers for both Devoxx UK and France now open!

The two conferences are taking place the last week of March 2013 with London on March 26th and 27 and Paris on March 28th and 29th. Oracle fully supports "Devoxx UK" and "Devoxx France" as a European Platinum Partner. Submit proposals and participate in both conferences since they are a two-hour train ride away from one another.

The Devoxx conferences are designed “for developers by developers.” The conference committees are looking for speakers who are passionate developers unafraid to share their knowledge of Java, mobile, web and beyond. The sessions are about frameworks, tools and development with in-depth conference sessions, short practical quickies, and bird-of-a-feather discussions. Those different formats allow speakers to choose the best way to present their topics and can be mentioned during the submission process

Devoxx has proven its success under Stephan Janssen, organizer of Devoxx in Belgium for the past 11 years. Devoxx has been the biggest Java conference in Europe for many years. To organize those local conferences, Stephan has enrolled the top community leaders in the UK and France. Ben Evans and Martijn Verberg are the leaders of London Java User Group (JUG) and are also known internationally for starting the Adopt-a-JSR program. Antonio Goncalves is the leader of the Paris JUG. He organized last year’s Devoxx France, which was a big success with twice the size first expected.

The organizers made sure to add the local character to the conferences. "The community energy has to feel right," said Ben Evans and for that he picked an "old Victoria hall" for the venue. Those leaders are part of very dynamic Java communities in France and in the UK. France has 22 JUGs; the Paris JUG alone has 2,000 members. The UK has over 50,000 developers working in London and its surroundings; a lot of them are Java developers working in the financial industry. The conference fee is kept as low as possible to encourage those developers to attend. Devoxx promises to be crowded and sold out in advance. Make sure to submit your talks to both Devoxx UK and France before January 31st, 2013. 



Friday Nov 09, 2012

Devoxx Coming Up!

 Devoxx, the biggest Java conference in Europe, is  only a couple of days away. From November 12th to  16th, over 3,400 developers from all over Europe  are descending on Antwerp, Belgium for a week  focused on Java.

 At the Oracle booth, Java experts will be available  to answer your  questions and demo the new  features of the Java Platform, including Java  Embedded,  JavaFX, JavaSE and Java EE.


 Beer bash at the booth Tuesday from 17:30-19:30 and Wednesday/Thursday from 18:00 to 20:00. Oracle is also raffling off two Raspberry PI and books every day. Make sure to stop by  and enter the raffle during the day.


Check the online schedule with sessions from the Java experts at Oracle.

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