Wednesday Aug 26, 2015

New Java Champion Vinicius Senger

Welcome to the new Java Champion: Vinicius Senger 

Vinicius Senger is the founder of Globalcode, a company teaching programming to trainers and professionals.

He has 20 years of experience in programming. His first Java app ran in HPUX capturing SNMP data from the network and storing in Sybase. He did a number of projects with J2EE for financial services and banks using web components, EJB, JMS and many different types of architectures using JSF, Seam, Spring, etc.

In addition, he wrote programs on embedded devices and created the 2011 Duke's Choice Award project called jHome Automation that uses Java EE to provide home automation using different devices and communication protocols. He is dedicated to developing Java Embedded and Java EE projects. Last year, he implemented Java Embedded for a sailboat for JavaOne 2014. He just launched Combike project, which is a Smart Helmet for bikers using camera, GPS, accelerometer and a social network behind.

He is a frequent speaker at many Java conferences around the world including Devoxx, JFokus, and The Developer Conference in Brazil that he co-organizes. He has been a JavaOne rockstar speaker for several years.

He is a regular contributor to the Java Magazine and wrote an article about device I/O for the November 2014 issue. He also authored an IoT video series in English and Portuguese on YouTube.com/java 

Java champions are an exclusive group of passionate Java technologists and community leaders who are community-nominated. Learn more about Java Champions.   

Wednesday May 06, 2015

Think Functional With Java 8

Want to master parallel programming in Java 8? The syntax of Lambda Expressions is fairly simple. How Lambdas and the Streams work together is not as straightforward. Both features introduce a functional style of programming into Java for the first time.  In his Virtual Technology Summit session, Simon Ritter will explain how to rethink the way you program with functional programming and Java in mind.  He will use real world examples to show how to write functional code in Java and what things to avoid. Join him for this session at the next Virtual Technology Summit (VTS).  

We are celebrating 20 years of Java and innovations with Reactive Java EE, Java 8 Lambdas and IoT projects. The VTS is an interactive, online event, sponsored by the Oracle Technology Network (OTN). VTS is free, but you must register.  Join us for one of these exclusive events in your time zone:  

EMEA - May 12 - 9am to 12:30pm GMT
APAC - May 19 - 3pm to 6:30pm AU/SYD

Register now. The event is free 


Tuesday Apr 07, 2015

Devoxx France 2015

Taking place this week April 8 to 10 in Paris is Devoxx France, one of five Java developer conferences in Europe. The conference is in English and French and all the sessions will be available on Parleys website a couple of weeks after the conference. 

This year, Oracle is a Platinum sponsor. Check out the Oracle Java sessions:  

Java Mission Control for Earthlings
April 9, 15:10 - 16:00
James Weaver, Consulting Member of Technical Staff, Oracle

Java 9 Plan
April 9, 16:35 – 17:25
Brian Goetz, Java Language Architect, Oracle
Paul Sandoz, Software Developer, Oracle

Java EE 7 Batch Processing in the Real World
April 9, 17:40 - 18:30, Neuilly 252 AB
David Delabassee, Software Evangelist, Oracle

Java 8 EE, A Snapshot Overview
April 9, 17:40 - 18:30, Neuilly 252 AB
David Delabassee, Software Evangelist, Oracle

Java EE Birds of Feather Session
April 9, 20:30 – 21:30, Neuilly 252 AB
David Delabassee, Software Evangelist, Oracle

Domotique et Java, Birds of Feather Session
April 9, 21:30 – 22:30, Paris 202-203 Lab
David Delabassee, Software Evangelist, Oracle

Batch API (JSR 352) Hands-on Lab
April 10, 11:00 – 13:50, Paris 224M-225M Lab
David Delabassee, Software Evangelist, Oracle

Project Jigsaw
April 10, 14:05 – 14:55, Maillot
Paul Sandoz, Software Developer, Oracle

IoT, Java, and Autonomous Drones
April 10, 14:05 – 14:55, Room: Amphi Bleu
James Weaver, Consulting Member of Technical Staff, Oracle

Finally, Security API JSR 375
April 10, 15:10 – 16:00, Room: Paris 241
Alex Kosowski, Principal Member of Technical Staff. Oracle

If you attend the conference, please swing by booth #P04 and chat with Java experts who will be onsite answering questions.

Thursday Mar 19, 2015

Nighthacking at JavaLand

By Guest Blogger Stephen Chin

JavaLand is a community conference in Germany that is held in an amusement park. Come learn not only about Java and technology, but also about how geeks have fun!

We will have a live NightHacking stream running from the Java Community Area on Tuesday and Wednesday with an all-star interview line-up. Each day will also conclude with an exciting combined vJUG session, which you won’t want to miss!

Catch the action at http://nighthacking.com/, and follow the NightHacking Twitter handel for late-breaking updates.

Schedule (Time Zone is CET)



Tuesday Feb 17, 2015

Free Open Source Tools for Maven, HTML5, IoT, and Java EE

Are you struggling with being productive in Maven, HTML5 frameworks such as AngularJS, IoT hardware such as the Raspberry Pi, or Java EE? Do you want free, easy to use, out-of-the-box tools for quickly and efficiently developing all kinds of applications? You really need to give the NetBeans IDE a whirl! At the next Virtual Technology Summit,  OTN will show you the latest enhancements and cool features of the free, open-source NetBeans IDE, which are used around the world, from engineers at Boeing and NASA to Java architects such as James Gosling and Stuart Marks! This is one of four Java sessions of the OTN Virtual Technology Day. Other topics include JavaScript on the JVM, Java Application Monitoring and Java Wearables.

If you haven't looked at the NetBeans IDE lately, you'll be blown away by the fast speed and performance enhancements. If you are completely new to the NetBeans IDE, see how easy it is to get started and be productive. For example, did you know NetBeans can refactor all your code from Java SE 7 to Java SE 8? See how in this session, lead by NetBeans expert Geertjan Wielenga.

Virtual Technology Summits (VTS) are interactive, online events, sponsored by the Oracle Technology Network (OTN). VTSs are free, but you must register:

 • EMEA – 25 February  - 9:00 to 13:00 BST  REGISTER

APAC – 4 March  –  9:30 to 13:30 IST  REGISTER

Each OTN VTS features four technical tracks, each with a unique focus on specific tools, technologies, and tips: Java, Database, Middleware and Systems. Registration allows you to attend any session on any track. We'll kick off the VTS with Java Community Update by Tori Wieldt. There will be places to hang out and meet other attendees between sessions. Please join us!

Thursday Jan 29, 2015

A Young Woman Innovator Programs with Java

Hania Guiagoussou is a passionate Java developer and a high school student in Dublin, California. She developed a "Water Saver" system to control the water usage in any garden or field. She just won third place and the prize of ten thousand dollars in the Digital Innovative Challenges organized by the ITC/Telecoms  

Q: When did you start programming?

Hania: I started programming at the age of nine. My dad is a computer engineer and he encouraged my brother and me to program. I wasn’t into programming until I went to a Java programming summer workshop at Oracle where I learned object oriented programming using Alice. If it weren't for Alice, I wouldn't be interested in programming. Alice was fun and inspired me to create animation projects. 

Q: What have you been programming lately?

Hania: My last project was a “Water Saver” system. It is an implementation of machine-to-machine communication that optimizes the use of water. I used sensors to capture soil humidity and surrounding temperature. The sensors are connected to a Raspberry Pi from where an intelligent agent collects and analyzes environmental data, then records it in Java objects. I first created the system for a science fair project in Pleasanton California. My  friend and I were going to do a project to study the impact of herbal tea on the human memory. However, returning from school one day after it rained a lot, I saw sprinklers on even though plants and the soil had enough water in the entire neighborhood. At that time the news channels were all talking about water restrictions because of the drought in California. I said to myself “I’ve got the idea for my science fair competition!” 

Q: And you won an award for it...

Hania: Along with my teammate, we received a few awards from the local engineering and science fair in March 2014. We won a special award sponsored by the local utility company and third place in the Computer Science, Maths and Engineering category from over 300 projects. In September 2014, I had an opportunity to compete in an African competition in Chad where I made it to the final round in the Digital Innovative Challenges organized by the ITC/Telecoms and Information Ministries under the sponsorship of the president of Chad and in partnership with the International Telecommunication Organization (ITU). I was the youngest participant in the finals. My project won third place and I won a generous prize of 5 million local francs (around 10 thousand US dollars). 

Q: How would you advise young girls to get started in programming?

Hania: That's a really a good question because girls are not really interested in Computer Science. In my Computer Science and Engineering class, there are only 10 percent girls. I think girls should just play with tools like Alice and create animations using characters and virtual worlds of their choice. I would love to have an opportunity to show girls of my age the satisfaction of programming.

Q: How easy was it for you to get started?

Hania: Before the Alice workshop, I was not interested to go beyond the “Hello, World” application. With Alice I used advanced blocks of codes that were easy to comprehend as I was manipulating real objects using object-oriented programming. I was able to use the Java programming language without knowing I was coding. I had to get introduced in a way that I could embrace, enjoy and innovate.

Q: What do you like about Java?

Hania: I like how you can program it once and it runs on different environments. For example, for the water saver project, the program we created was targeting embedded systems and was tested on Raspberry Pi. But we initially developed the code using NetBeans on a Window PC. We took the same program and ran it on a Linux Operating system on Mac. We then moved the same code to the Raspberry Pi and it runs fine without a single code change. I really like the fact that I can program one time, run on my personal computer then have it working on many other devices. Additionally, creating a client side program using Android to connect the embedded world with our day to day devices was the icing on the cake. I was very happy when from my mobile phone and tablet I launched a standard HTML browser and controlled my application remotely. 

Q: What would you like to do as a career? 

Hania: It has always been my dream to become a doctor. Now, I’d like to pursue medical studies and combine it with tele-medicine to remotely help people in rural areas in developing country where heath-care system is not very developed. I want to become an influential women who can bring positive changes in people’s live. I hope one day to build a bridge between doctors from the U.S., Canada, Europe  in order to help doctors in Africa communicate and exchange experiences with each other and prevent deathly diseases. 


Wednesday Jan 07, 2015

Attracting Women Speakers to Tech Conferences

Hear from Trisha Gee and Regina Ten Bruggencate as they share tips and tricks to help women and new speakers get started. They themselves are veteran speakers, members of program committees and community leaders for user groups and the Duchess organization, a community of technical women. 

Tuesday Nov 18, 2014

Java Magazine: The Internet of Things

Java is everywhere. As the Internet of Things (IoT) moves from hype to reality, we’re seeing embedded Java used in a wide range of applications, from industrial automation systems and medical imaging devices to connected vehicles and smart meters. In the November/December 2014 issue of Java Magazine, we bring you the latest on Java and the IoT.

In our interview with Oracle’s Henrik Ståhl, we discuss the opportunities and challenges that the IoT presents for Java developers, and how changes in Java SE and Java ME (and their embedded versions) make it easier to reassemble and strip down code for smaller devices.

We also talk to Freescale’s Maulin Patel about the IoT and Java, profile IoT Developer Challenge winner Lhings Connected Table, and show you how robots make factories smarter. Plus, Vinicius Senger introduces the Device I/O API, Kai Kreuzer brings us the latest on smart homes, and Michael Kölling shows us how to program in Java on the Raspberry Pi.

Plus, we take a look at the developers of tomorrow in “Java: the Next Generation.” I’ve been talking to kids at various programming events for the last few months, and I am inspired. These kids are brave, bold, and so smart. They do not fear technology; they embrace it. I’m thrilled to see so many programs around the world that are teaching young people to code and helping them to create their futures.

Read all about it in the current issue of Java Magazine!

Monday Nov 10, 2014

Devoxx Conference Is Underway!

The biggest Java developer conference in Europe started today with two days of University Sessions, 3 hour labs on various Java topics. 

The sessions from Oracle speakers during those two days are:

Monday, November 10

  • Devoxx4Kids Workshops Lab with Stephen Chin, Daniel De Luca, and Arun Gupta
  • Devoxx Future: IoT Magic Show with Stephen Chin and Angela Caicedo 

Tuesday, November 11

  • 
Rapberry Pi with Java 8 with Stephen Chin, James Weaver and Robert Savage 

  • Go With The Flow: Streams and Lambdas Power Lab – Hands on Labs with 
Simon Ritter, Stuart Marks, and Angela Caicedo, 

  • Birds-of-a-feather: JCP, Adopt-a-JSR, and You with Heather Van Cura

On Tuesday, attendees will get the chance to work on open source projects such as JSRs with the help of veteran contributors and spec leads at the Hackergarten.

Starting tomorrow at the Oracle booth, enter the raffle for a chance to win a Raspberry Pi. Three Raspberry Pis will be raffled off every day. Don’t miss the beer bash late in the afternoon on Tuesday and Thursday.

Check out all the Oracle sessions during Devoxx 2014 

Tuesday Sep 30, 2014

Life around the Java Hub

By Guest Blogger Timothy Beneke

At the Java Hub, Java’s flexibility was illustrated through a number of demos and displays. The message was clear: any Java developer can program in Java Embedded, so get your Raspberry Pi, connect it to your favorite device, and have fun with the Internet of Things (IoT). Aldebaran Robotics presented the friendly, 2-foot-tall, high-tech Nao robot, which can be used to enhance social awareness among autistic children. It danced, gave fist bumps, and seemed to drink in the attention. Across the room, a 3-D printer performed its magic, creating clones of Duke using JavaFX and Oracle Java Embedded.

James Gosling’s Wave Glider
A Liquid Robotics Wave Glider, with software developed by James Gosling, was also on display. Wave Glider, which looks like a souped-up yellow surfboard, is an autonomous water and solar-powered platform that transmits oceanic information such as water temperature and chemistry, wind speed, living organisms, and ocean bottom topography using Java SE Embedded applications for defense, oil and gas, and commercial and science customers.

Wave Glider has two parts, the surfboard-like “float” loaded with solar panels to recharge lithium-ion batteries—which resides at the ocean’s surface—and the sub, equipped with wings and tethered six meters below.  

Java Capabilities for the Green Power Industry

Alexander Belokrylov, product manager for Java ME Embedded, showed off Java ME capabilities for the green power industry, demonstrating how a Java ME Embedded application can control and monitor energy sources on a bicycle-driven electric generator.

“This is just a regular bicycle that illustrates the Raspberry Pi functionality,” explained Belokrylov. “Here it is connected to a bicycle, but it could also function with an irrigation system or many other things. The key point is that with Java ME and no libraries, we can run a fully autonomous system that connects to the cloud and measures energy usage. This is a small footprint and it can do a lot. We want Java developers to take this power and run with it!”

A Car that Knows You
Gary Collins, principal member of technical staff at Oracle, showed off the Telematics Car Demo from Sunday’s Java Strategy keynote, where a simulated electric car used Java ME Embedded data and JavaFX to aggregate and display temperature, speed, light sensor, crash, and other data. “The functionality enables a car to make adjustments for drivers,” explained Collins. “Suppose you drive this car from a rental agency and come back to rent it again. The agency can access data about you and adjust the car for temperature, seating position, preferred radio stations and many other applications. It’s a car that can learn your preferences and patterns.”


Playing with Java SE Embedded

Across from the car simulator, a row of Raspberry Pis interfaced with cubed light bulbs, Sphero Robotic Balls, XY-Plotters for drawing, and more. Attendees were invited to choose an “if statement” and then tweet, send an SMS message using a motion or light sensor, draw their names with a Java or Oracle logo or picture of Duke, and more. Light bulbs could light up in strange ways; a Sphero Ball could act crazy. It was all in the spirit of play to illustrate that Java SE Embedded offers a wide range of possibilities for developers who want to try out the IoT with Java 8.

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