Monday Mar 23, 2015

Two Live Streaming Java Sessions from vJUG

The vJUG, a virtual Java user group, presents live streaming technical sessions about topics related to Java, JVM, Java EE, Internet of Things and more. Organized by Mani Sarkar and Simon Maple from the London Java Community, their aim is to get the greatest minds and speakers of the Java industry to give talks and presentations in the form of webinars and live streaming from JUG meetups.

First session: How is Java/JVM built?  Tuesday, March 24, 2015 at 14:45 UTC, 15:45 in Germany, 10:45am in New York, 7:45am in San Francisco, and 22:45 in Beijing

Mani Sarkar and Daniel Bryant will give an overview of the Adopt OpenJDK program. They’ll explain why developers should get involved, how to participate, and how front-end developers can take advantage of the Adopt OpenJDK. Watch the session live at http://nighthacking.com/event/javaland-2015/

Second session: What's coming in Java.Next? Wednesday, March 25, 2015 at 14:45 UTC, 15:45 in Germany, 10:45am in New York, 7:45am in San Francisco, and 22:45 in Beijing

Learn from Heather VanCura how you can take part in Java technology by Adopting a JSR. This session give a brief overview of the Adopt-a-JSR program. Andres Almiray will discuss JSR 377, Desktop|Embedded Application API; Anatole Tresch will discuss JSR 354, Money & Currency API; and Ed Burns will discuss the two JSRs he is currently leading, JSR 369, Java Servlet 4.0 Specification and JSR 372, JavaServer Faces (JSF 2.3) Specification.

Two sessions are scheduled for next week. They are live from the JavaLand Conference in Germany, in partnership with the Nighthacking community.  You can watch them online at http://nighthacking.com/event/javaland-2015/  

Thursday Mar 19, 2015

Nighthacking at JavaLand

By Guest Blogger Stephen Chin

JavaLand is a community conference in Germany that is held in an amusement park. Come learn not only about Java and technology, but also about how geeks have fun!

We will have a live NightHacking stream running from the Java Community Area on Tuesday and Wednesday with an all-star interview line-up. Each day will also conclude with an exciting combined vJUG session, which you won’t want to miss!

Catch the action at http://nighthacking.com/, and follow the NightHacking Twitter handel for late-breaking updates.

Schedule (Time Zone is CET)



Wednesday Mar 18, 2015

Join JavaOne in Brazil

The premier Java conference in Latin America will bring together Java experts and enthusiasts for three days from June 23 to 25, 2015. Register before May 4 and you will save R$900 off the onsite price. 

Visionaries and world-renowned speakers will present conference and hands-on sessions covering five tracks, which include clients and user interface; core Java platform; Java and the Internet of Things; server side Java and the new track about Java, DevOps and the cloud.

Don’t wait, register now!

Thursday Jan 29, 2015

A Young Woman Innovator Programs with Java

Hania Guiagoussou is a passionate Java developer and a high school student in Dublin, California. She developed a "Water Saver" system to control the water usage in any garden or field. She just won third place and the prize of ten thousand dollars in the Digital Innovative Challenges organized by the ITC/Telecoms  

Q: When did you start programming?

Hania: I started programming at the age of nine. My dad is a computer engineer and he encouraged my brother and me to program. I wasn’t into programming until I went to a Java programming summer workshop at Oracle where I learned object oriented programming using Alice. If it weren't for Alice, I wouldn't be interested in programming. Alice was fun and inspired me to create animation projects. 

Q: What have you been programming lately?

Hania: My last project was a “Water Saver” system. It is an implementation of machine-to-machine communication that optimizes the use of water. I used sensors to capture soil humidity and surrounding temperature. The sensors are connected to a Raspberry Pi from where an intelligent agent collects and analyzes environmental data, then records it in Java objects. I first created the system for a science fair project in Pleasanton California. My  friend and I were going to do a project to study the impact of herbal tea on the human memory. However, returning from school one day after it rained a lot, I saw sprinklers on even though plants and the soil had enough water in the entire neighborhood. At that time the news channels were all talking about water restrictions because of the drought in California. I said to myself “I’ve got the idea for my science fair competition!” 

Q: And you won an award for it...

Hania: Along with my teammate, we received a few awards from the local engineering and science fair in March 2014. We won a special award sponsored by the local utility company and third place in the Computer Science, Maths and Engineering category from over 300 projects. In September 2014, I had an opportunity to compete in an African competition in Chad where I made it to the final round in the Digital Innovative Challenges organized by the ITC/Telecoms and Information Ministries under the sponsorship of the president of Chad and in partnership with the International Telecommunication Organization (ITU). I was the youngest participant in the finals. My project won third place and I won a generous prize of 5 million local francs (around 10 thousand US dollars). 

Q: How would you advise young girls to get started in programming?

Hania: That's a really a good question because girls are not really interested in Computer Science. In my Computer Science and Engineering class, there are only 10 percent girls. I think girls should just play with tools like Alice and create animations using characters and virtual worlds of their choice. I would love to have an opportunity to show girls of my age the satisfaction of programming.

Q: How easy was it for you to get started?

Hania: Before the Alice workshop, I was not interested to go beyond the “Hello, World” application. With Alice I used advanced blocks of codes that were easy to comprehend as I was manipulating real objects using object-oriented programming. I was able to use the Java programming language without knowing I was coding. I had to get introduced in a way that I could embrace, enjoy and innovate.

Q: What do you like about Java?

Hania: I like how you can program it once and it runs on different environments. For example, for the water saver project, the program we created was targeting embedded systems and was tested on Raspberry Pi. But we initially developed the code using NetBeans on a Window PC. We took the same program and ran it on a Linux Operating system on Mac. We then moved the same code to the Raspberry Pi and it runs fine without a single code change. I really like the fact that I can program one time, run on my personal computer then have it working on many other devices. Additionally, creating a client side program using Android to connect the embedded world with our day to day devices was the icing on the cake. I was very happy when from my mobile phone and tablet I launched a standard HTML browser and controlled my application remotely. 

Q: What would you like to do as a career? 

Hania: It has always been my dream to become a doctor. Now, I’d like to pursue medical studies and combine it with tele-medicine to remotely help people in rural areas in developing country where heath-care system is not very developed. I want to become an influential women who can bring positive changes in people’s live. I hope one day to build a bridge between doctors from the U.S., Canada, Europe  in order to help doctors in Africa communicate and exchange experiences with each other and prevent deathly diseases. 


Tuesday Nov 18, 2014

Java Magazine: The Internet of Things

Java is everywhere. As the Internet of Things (IoT) moves from hype to reality, we’re seeing embedded Java used in a wide range of applications, from industrial automation systems and medical imaging devices to connected vehicles and smart meters. In the November/December 2014 issue of Java Magazine, we bring you the latest on Java and the IoT.

In our interview with Oracle’s Henrik Ståhl, we discuss the opportunities and challenges that the IoT presents for Java developers, and how changes in Java SE and Java ME (and their embedded versions) make it easier to reassemble and strip down code for smaller devices.

We also talk to Freescale’s Maulin Patel about the IoT and Java, profile IoT Developer Challenge winner Lhings Connected Table, and show you how robots make factories smarter. Plus, Vinicius Senger introduces the Device I/O API, Kai Kreuzer brings us the latest on smart homes, and Michael Kölling shows us how to program in Java on the Raspberry Pi.

Plus, we take a look at the developers of tomorrow in “Java: the Next Generation.” I’ve been talking to kids at various programming events for the last few months, and I am inspired. These kids are brave, bold, and so smart. They do not fear technology; they embrace it. I’m thrilled to see so many programs around the world that are teaching young people to code and helping them to create their futures.

Read all about it in the current issue of Java Magazine!

Tuesday Sep 30, 2014

Life around the Java Hub

By Guest Blogger Timothy Beneke

At the Java Hub, Java’s flexibility was illustrated through a number of demos and displays. The message was clear: any Java developer can program in Java Embedded, so get your Raspberry Pi, connect it to your favorite device, and have fun with the Internet of Things (IoT). Aldebaran Robotics presented the friendly, 2-foot-tall, high-tech Nao robot, which can be used to enhance social awareness among autistic children. It danced, gave fist bumps, and seemed to drink in the attention. Across the room, a 3-D printer performed its magic, creating clones of Duke using JavaFX and Oracle Java Embedded.

James Gosling’s Wave Glider
A Liquid Robotics Wave Glider, with software developed by James Gosling, was also on display. Wave Glider, which looks like a souped-up yellow surfboard, is an autonomous water and solar-powered platform that transmits oceanic information such as water temperature and chemistry, wind speed, living organisms, and ocean bottom topography using Java SE Embedded applications for defense, oil and gas, and commercial and science customers.

Wave Glider has two parts, the surfboard-like “float” loaded with solar panels to recharge lithium-ion batteries—which resides at the ocean’s surface—and the sub, equipped with wings and tethered six meters below.  

Java Capabilities for the Green Power Industry

Alexander Belokrylov, product manager for Java ME Embedded, showed off Java ME capabilities for the green power industry, demonstrating how a Java ME Embedded application can control and monitor energy sources on a bicycle-driven electric generator.

“This is just a regular bicycle that illustrates the Raspberry Pi functionality,” explained Belokrylov. “Here it is connected to a bicycle, but it could also function with an irrigation system or many other things. The key point is that with Java ME and no libraries, we can run a fully autonomous system that connects to the cloud and measures energy usage. This is a small footprint and it can do a lot. We want Java developers to take this power and run with it!”

A Car that Knows You
Gary Collins, principal member of technical staff at Oracle, showed off the Telematics Car Demo from Sunday’s Java Strategy keynote, where a simulated electric car used Java ME Embedded data and JavaFX to aggregate and display temperature, speed, light sensor, crash, and other data. “The functionality enables a car to make adjustments for drivers,” explained Collins. “Suppose you drive this car from a rental agency and come back to rent it again. The agency can access data about you and adjust the car for temperature, seating position, preferred radio stations and many other applications. It’s a car that can learn your preferences and patterns.”


Playing with Java SE Embedded

Across from the car simulator, a row of Raspberry Pis interfaced with cubed light bulbs, Sphero Robotic Balls, XY-Plotters for drawing, and more. Attendees were invited to choose an “if statement” and then tweet, send an SMS message using a motion or light sensor, draw their names with a Java or Oracle logo or picture of Duke, and more. Light bulbs could light up in strange ways; a Sphero Ball could act crazy. It was all in the spirit of play to illustrate that Java SE Embedded offers a wide range of possibilities for developers who want to try out the IoT with Java 8.

    Thursday Feb 28, 2013

    Java in the Internet of Things

    In this video, I talk to Product Manager for Small Embedded Java Terrence Barr at Embedded World. He gave presentations that included the slide that said "Stop Reinventing the Plumbing." I asked him what that means:

    Java already has the connectivity, manageability, interoperability, and back-end integration you need for apps, so you can concentrate on your area of expertise, your "value add" on top of that plumbing. Java -- saving the world, one developer, one sensor at a time. ;-)

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