Thursday Sep 26, 2013

At the Java Demogrounds: The Internet of Things at JavaOne 2013

Throughout JavaOne (and Oracle OpenWorld) the movements of attendees were being tracked in an impressive demonstration that powerful applications of the Internet of Things can be rapidly put together in order to gather a host of data with relatively little expense or effort. Throughout the conference, IoT in Motion has been efficiently counting and tracking conference attendees in various locations to reveal the power and utility of end-to-end data collection and management technologies. IoT in Motion is a collaboration among Oracle, Eurotech, Hitachi Communication Technologies America (CTA), and Hitachi Consulting.

Oracle’s Jennifer Douglas provided a concise overview of the technology: “We have Hitachi Consulting, who helped build the actual application that is running the data, using an Oracle Exalytic box over at Open World and the Oracle BI (Business Intelligence) dashboard. People from the Oracle BI team also contributed to this. Hitachi CTA has their SuperJ running in conjunction with Oracle’s Java SE embedded through a gateway to the Eurotech Everyware Cloud, which collects the raw data. Then the Exalytic box compiles the data and converts it into something we can actually utilize.” All of the technology is running on Java.  

IoT in Motion is not to be confused with security tracking using face recognition software which can recognize and identify the movements of individual people. While it can distinguish a dog or a vehicle from a person, the stereoscopic camera merely registers and counts people going in and out of the spaces without monitoring any features of individual people. No one’s privacy is violated in the process of tracking.

Oleg Kostukovsky of Oracle’s Java Embedded Global Business Unit, articulated the importance of IoT in Motion for the Java developer. “This solution from end to end is built on Java,” explained Kostukovsky, “all the way from the embedded device to the back end. So a Java developer can leverage existing Java skills to develop the application. All of the underlying pieces and blocks to enable application development are already in place, so if you are customizing an application running on a gateway, there is a Java framework available for that. It’s the type of environment your typical java programmer is used to so they don’t need to know about any specific embedded stuff or connectivity with sensors. On the back end, we are leveraging Oracle middleware products – pure Java based. You can develop Java code and connect Java adapters to different sources of data. So there is nothing you need to know except your basic Java development skills – it’s very similar to a Java enterprise scenario. So the learning curve is very low.”

Oracle’s Internet of Things Platform

Friday Sep 13, 2013

Simon Ritter Prepares to Show off Java SE 8 at JavaOne

Oracle’s Simon Ritter has more tricks up his sleeve with cars and hand-tracking devices.[Read More]

Wednesday May 22, 2013

What's New in JMS 2.0: Ease of Use

A new article by Oracle’s Nigel Deakin, up on otn/java, titled “What's New in JMS 2.0, Part One: Ease of Use,” demonstrates ways in which JMS 2.0 enables developers to send and receive messages while writing less code. Some features of JMS 2.0, part of Java EE 7, and can be deployed in Java EE Web or EJB applications, while others can only be used standalone in a Java SE environment.

Deakin writes:

“The single biggest change in JMS 2.0 is the introduction of a new API for sending and receiving messages that reduces the amount of code a developer must write. For applications that run in a Java EE application server, the new API also supports resource injection. This allows the application server to take care of the creation and management of JMS objects, simplifying the application even further…”

The new API, known as the “simplified” API, is simpler and easier to use than the existing JMS 1.1 API, now known as the “classic” API.

Deakin describes the new API as follows:

“The simplified API consists of three new interfaces: JMSContext, JMSProducer, and JMSConsumer:

* JMSContext replaces the separate Connection and  Session objects in the classic API with a single object.

* JMSProducer is a lightweight replacement for the MessageProducer object in the classic API. It allows message delivery options, headers, and properties to be configured using method chaining (sometimes known as a builder pattern).

* JMSConsumer replaces the MessageConsumer object in the classic API and is used in a similar way.”

Developers can now choose between the two APIs and have access to both the classic and new features. Stay tuned for Part Two, in which Deakin will explore new messaging features in JMS 2.0.

Check out Part One here.

Friday Feb 03, 2012

Building Applications in JavaFX 2.0

In a new tech article up on otn/java, adapted from a series of innovative blog postings, Downstream's Senior Java Architect Daniel Zwolenski develops ways to build apps in JavaFX 2.0 -- from Spring to controller injection to client servers. The article is derived from several blogs wherein he explores ways to create applications in JavaFX 2.0, building upon a direct port of Oracle Chief Client Java Architect Richard Bair’s FXML+Guice dependency injection example into Spring.

As Zwolenski says, “Many developers still believe that Spring is all about XML configuration files, but it has evolved a lot since the early days. I’m going to use Spring’s annotation-based configuration to create a pure Java example (i.e., zero Spring XML) that looks almost identical to the Guice one.”

Zwolenski is the creator of JFX Flow which he describes as, “a free, open source framework for developing rich, interactive and user friendly web-style GUIs for desktops using JavaFX (2.0+). JFX Flow combines the powerful feature set of JavaFX (styling, animations, FXML, etc.) with a simple ‘web flow’ style framework that is easy to use and that fosters clean architectural patterns, especially when developing Java EE applications. JFX Flow is currently in Alpha release and may still have some bugs. The core framework is usable however, and the API is quite stable.”

Read the complete article here.


Thursday Jan 19, 2012

A File I/O Tutorial Featuring NIO.2

A tutorial on the front page of otn/java titled “A File I/O Tutorial Featuring NIO.2” explains the new file I/O mechanism introduced in the Java 7 release. The java.nio.file package and its related package, java.nio.file.attribute, provide comprehensive support for file I/O and for accessing the default file system. Though the API has many classes, developers need only focus on a few key entry points. The tutorial makes it clear that the API is intuitive and easy to use.

The tutorial begins by asking, “What is a path?” and then introduces the Path class, which is the primary entry point for the package. It explains Methods in the Path class related to syntactic operations and moves on to the other primary class in the package, the Files class, which contains methods related to file operations. It then introduces some concepts common to many file operations and explains methods for checking, deleting, copying, and moving files.

The tutorial offers a concise summary of the API with suggestions for further learning.

“The java.nio.file package provides extensive support for file and file system I/O. This is a very comprehensive API, but the key entry points are as follows:
•    The Path class has methods for manipulating a path.
•    The Files class has methods for file operations, such as moving, copy, deleting, and also methods for retrieving and  setting file attributes.
•    The FileSystem class has a variety of methods for obtaining information about the file system.”

More information on NIO.2 can be found on the OpenJDK: NIO project website on java.net. This site includes resources for features provided by NIO.2 that are beyond the scope of this tutorial, such as multicasting, asynchronous I/O, and creating your own file system implementation.


Read the complete article here.

Friday Nov 18, 2011

JavaFX 2.0 at Devoxx 2011

JavaFX had a big presence at Devoxx 2011 as witnessed by the number of sessions this year given by leading JavaFX movers and shakers.

  •     “JavaFX 2.0 -- A Java Developer's Guide” by Java Champions Stephen Chin and Peter Pilgrim
  •     “JavaFX 2.0 Hands On” by Jasper Potts and Richard Bair
  •     “Animation Bringing your User Interfaces to Life” by Michael Heinrichs and John Yoong (JavaFX development team)
  •     “Complete Guide to Writing Custom Bindings in JavaFX 2.0” by Michael Heinrichs (JavaFX development team)
  •     “Java Rich Clients with JavaFX 2.0” by Jasper Potts and Richard Bair
  •     “JavaFX Properties & Bindings for Experts” (and those who want to become experts) by Michael Heinrichs (JavaFX development team)
  •     “JavaFX Under the Hood” by Richard Bair
  •     “JavaFX Open Mic” with Jasper Potts and Richard Bair


With the release of JavaFX 2.0 and Oracle’s move towards an open development model with an open bug database already created, it’s a great time for developers to take the JavaFX plunge.


One Devoxx attendee, Mark Stephens, a developer at IDRsolutions blogged about a problem he was having setting up JavaFX on NetBeans to work on his Mac. He wrote:


“I’ve tried desperate measures (I even read and reread the instructions) but it did not help. Luckily, I am at Devoxx at the moment and there seem to be a lot of JavaFX gurus here (and it is running on all their Macs). So I asked them… It turns out that sometimes the software does not automatically pickup the settings like it should do if you give it the JavaFX SDK path. The solution is actually really simple (isn’t it always once you know). Enter these values manually and it will work.”


He simply entered certain values and his problem was solved. He thanked Java Champion Stephen Chin, “for a great talk at Devoxx and putting me out of my misery.”


JavaFX in Java Magazine

Over in the November/December 2011 issue of Java Magazine, Oracle’s Simon Ritter, well known for his creative Java inventions at JavaOne, has an article up titled “JavaFX and Swing Integration” in which he shows developers how to use the power of JavaFX to migrate Swing interfaces to JavaFX. The consensus among JavaFX experts is that JavaFX is the next step in the evolution of Java as a rich client platform.


In the same issue Java Champion and JavaFX maven James Weaver has an article, “Using Transitions for Animation in JavaFX 2.0”. In addition, Oracle’s Vice President of Java Client Development, Nandini Ramani, provides the keys to unlock the mysteries of JavaFX 2.0 in her Java Magazine interview.


Look for the JavaFX community to grow and flourish in coming years.

Tuesday Oct 18, 2011

The Heads and Tails of Project Coin

JavaOne 2011 - Joseph Darcy, Member of the Oracle Technical Staff, spoke to a very large,
packed conference room in his “The Heads and Tails of Project Coin” (22641) session Tuesday.
Project Coin, a central part of Java 7, was described by Darcy as “a suite of language and
library changes to make things programmers do everyday easier.”

Project Coin makes life easier by removing extra text to make programs more readable;  
encouraging the writing of programs that are more reliable; and by integrating well with past and future changes.
Darcy emphasized that these are small language changes related to specification, implementation and testing;
there are no JVM changes. Project Coin was written to coordinate with forthcoming larger language changes.

Project Coin has strong IDE support:
• IntelliJ IDEA 10.5 and later                                                                                                
• Eclipse 3.7.1 and later                                                                                                                  
• NetBeans 7.0 and later

The six Project Coin features are:  
• Binary literals and underscores in literals                                                                                
• Strings in switch                                                                                                                          
• Diamond                                                                                                                                     
• Multi-catch and more precise rethrow                                                                                
• try-with-resources                                                                                                               
• Varargs warnings

Diamond and varargs warnings enable easier-to-use generics. Multi-catch and try-with-resources allow for more concise error handling. Strings-in-switch and literal improvements result in greater consistency and clarity.

Darcy proceeded to demonstrate five of the six Project Coin features to a highly engaged audience.
Check out his session slides and you can also view this talk @ http://parleys.com/d/2663.

What’s ahead for Project Coin in Java 8? Look for very small language changes on the horizon.

Monday Oct 17, 2011

Evolutionary Next-Steps - Technical Keynote JavaOne 2011

Monday morning's Technical Keynote began with Doug Fisher, Corporate Vice President and General Manager of the Software and Services Group’s System Software Division, Intel. Fisher and a number of Intel colleagues reviewed Intel’s long association with Java, and their collaborative work with Oracle to optimize the Java platform (for both the JVM and Fusion Middleware) on Intel hardware.


From there, Ashok Joshi, Senior Director of Development NoSQL Database, briefly discussed performance tuning with Intel of the newly announced Oracle NoSQL Database product.

From Evolution to Revolution: Java 7 to Java 8

Following Joshi, Mark Reinhold, Chief Architect of the Java Platform Group at Oracle, reviewed the history of Java 7, and its “Plan B” paradigm of including Project Coin (JSR 334), InvokeDynamic (JSR 292), and the Fork/Join Framework in the just-released Java 7, while incorporating Project Jigsaw and Project Lambda in the upcoming Java 8. Reinhold then explored the evolutionary benefits of these key new features of the Java 7 release -- offering both greater ease of development, and significant performance benefits. “Not only are these features available in Java 7 today,” noted Reinhold, “but as of last week, they are now supported in all three of the major Java IDEs.”

Reinhold next detailed plans for the upcoming Java 8 release, which promises more revolutionary features beyond the evolutionary offerings of Java 7. Project Lambda (JSR 335) will bring closures to the Java programming language. And Project Jigsaw (JSR TBD) aims to define a standard module system -- not just for application code, but for the platform itself.

JavaFX 2.0 is Here!

Richard Bair, Chief Architect, Client Java Platform, Oracle, then dove into the official debut of JavaFX 2.0, along with some stunning demos of the new facility, presented by several colleagues. Java FX 2.0 is Oracle’s premier development environment for rich client applications. Bair emphasized that JavaFX 2.0 was designed to offer:

Cross Platform
Leverage Java
Advanced Tooling
Developer Productivity
Amazing User Interfaces.

“We naturally want user interfaces that look good and work well,” said Bair. “It used to be just eye candy, but now it’s becoming a required feature for the things we write. We’re announcing today the general availability of JavaFX 2.0, at JavaFX.com. We think this is going to be a really big deal in the industry.”

An important aspect of any UI technology is a good visual development tool, and Bair next announced early access for the JavaFX Scene Builder, which will first be made available to select partners, then expanded to a general beta, and then a full release. But for those at JavaOne, an early build of the tool will be running and available for demo at the DEMOgrounds.

A series of stunning demos -- several of them BSD licensed caused much enthusiasm -- then took JavaFX 2.0 out for a spin, and clearly showed the possibilities and potentials of the new release -- including animated 3D audio EQ mapping, and a navigable 3D virtual room that featured live video of Oracle colleague Jasper Potts displayed on a wall monitor, along with real-time mimicking of Potts’ movements by a virtual Java Duke figure.

Bair noted that there are over 50 JavaFX sessions at JavaOne, and said that for anyone who attended all of them -- “I’ll buy you dinner!”

Moving Java EE into the Cloud

From there, Linda DeMichiel, Java EE 7 Specification Lead, explored the upcoming Java EE 7 release. “What’s new with the Java EE platform?” asked DeMichiel. “We’re moving Java EE into the Cloud. Our focus on this release is providing support for Platform as a Service. We want to provide a way for customers and users of the platform to leverage public, private and hybrid clouds. With Java EE 7, our focus is on the platform itself as a service, which can be leveraged in cloud environments.”

DeMichiel’s colleague, Arun Gupta, then demonstrated deployment of a Java EE application as a PaaS, using Glassfish 4.0. Both the application and instructions on how to replicate the demo are available online.

More Java Cards than People?

Lastly, Hinkmond Wong, of Oracle’s Java Embedded group, covered the latest in mobile and embedded Java, noting the three billion Java enabled phones and five billion Java Cards in the world today. “There are about 6.5 billion people in the world,” noted Wong, “and five billion Java Cards.”

2011 saw the introduction of Near Field Communication (NFC) payment system, including e-Passport in Java ME, allowing for mobile-to-mobile and machine-to-machine transactions with embedded security. Wong detailed the many new Java ME releases for 2011, along with several mobile and embedded technology demos—from cell phones to Blu-ray players.

The overflow crowd left the opening technical keynote energized – a real good start to this JavaOne!

Learn More:

Java 7 Features

Java SE 7 Features and Enhancements

A Look at Java 7's New Features

Contribute to JDK 8

JavaFX Homepage

JavaFX Overview

Java EE at a Glance

Java for Mobile Devices

Oracle NoSQL Database

Oracle Technology Network for Java Developers

Monday Oct 03, 2011

Evolutionary Next-Steps - Technical Keynote JavaOne 2011

Monday morning's Technical Keynote began with Doug Fisher, Corporate Vice President and General Manager of the Software and Services Group’s System Software Division, Intel. Fisher and a number of Intel colleagues reviewed Intel’s long association with Java, and their collaborative work with Oracle to optimize the Java platform (for both the JVM and Fusion Middleware) on Intel hardware.

From there, Ashok Joshi, Senior Director of Development NoSQL Database, briefly discussed performance tuning with Intel of the newly announced Oracle NoSQL Database product.

From Evolution to Revolution: Java 7 to Java 8

Following Joshi, Mark Reinhold, Chief Architect of the Java Platform Group at Oracle, reviewed the history of Java 7, and its “Plan B” paradigm of including Project Coin (JSR 334), InvokeDynamic (JSR 292), and the Fork/Join Framework in the just-released Java 7, while incorporating Project Jigsaw and Project Lambda in the upcoming Java 8. Reinhold then explored the evolutionary benefits of these key new features of the Java 7 release -- offering both greater ease of development, and significant performance benefits. “Not only are these features available in Java 7 today,” noted Reinhold, “but as of last week, they are now supported in all three of the major Java IDEs.”

Reinhold next detailed plans for the upcoming Java 8 release, which promises more revolutionary features beyond the evolutionary offerings of Java 7. Project Lambda (JSR 335) will bring closures to the Java programming language. And Project Jigsaw (JSR TBD) aims to define a standard module system -- not just for application code, but for the platform itself.

JavaFX 2.0 is Here!

Richard Bair, Chief Architect, Client Java Platform, Oracle, then dove into the official debut of JavaFX 2.0, along with some stunning demos of the new facility, presented by several colleagues. Java FX 2.0 is Oracle’s premier development environment for rich client applications. Bair emphasized that JavaFX 2.0 was designed to offer:

Cross Platform
Leverage Java
Advanced Tooling
Developer Productivity
Amazing User Interfaces.

“We naturally want user interfaces that look good and work well,” said Bair. “It used to be just eye candy, but now it’s becoming a required feature for the things we write. We’re announcing today the general availability of JavaFX 2.0, at JavaFX.com. We think this is going to be a really big deal in the industry.”

An important aspect of any UI technology is a good visual development tool, and Bair next announced early access for the JavaFX Scene Builder, which will first be made available to select partners, then expanded to a general beta, and then a full release. But for those at JavaOne, an early build of the tool will be running and available for demo at the DEMOgrounds.

A series of stunning demos -- several of them BSD licensed caused much enthusiasm -- then took JavaFX 2.0 out for a spin, and clearly showed the possibilities and potentials of the new release -- including animated 3D audio EQ mapping, and a navigable 3D virtual room that featured live video of Oracle colleague Jasper Potts displayed on a wall monitor, along with real-time mimicking of Potts’ movements by a virtual Java Duke figure.

Bair noted that there are over 50 JavaFX sessions at JavaOne, and said that for anyone who attended all of them -- “I’ll buy you dinner!”

Moving Java EE into the Cloud

From there, Linda DeMichiel, Java EE 7 Specification Lead, explored the upcoming Java EE 7 release. “What’s new with the Java EE platform?” asked DeMichiel. “We’re moving Java EE into the Cloud. Our focus on this release is providing support for Platform as a Service. We want to provide a way for customers and users of the platform to leverage public, private and hybrid clouds. With Java EE 7, our focus is on the platform itself as a service, which can be leveraged in cloud environments.”

DeMichiel’s colleague, Arun Gupta, then demonstrated deployment of a Java EE application as a PaaS, using Glassfish 4.0. Both the application and instructions on how to replicate the demo are available online.

More Java Cards than People?

Lastly, Hinkmond Wong, of Oracle’s Java Embedded group, covered the latest in mobile and embedded Java, noting the three billion Java enabled phones and five billion Java Cards in the world today. “There are about 6.5 billion people in the world,” noted Wong, “and five billion Java Cards.”

2011 saw the introduction of Near Field Communication (NFC) payment system, including e-Passport in Java ME, allowing for mobile-to-mobile and machine-to-machine transactions with embedded security. Wong detailed the many new Java ME releases for 2011, along with several mobile and embedded technology demos—from cell phones to Blu-ray players.

The overflow crowd left the opening technical keynote energized – a real good start to this JavaOne!

Learn More:

Java 7 Features:
http://openjdk.java.net/projects/jdk7/features/

Java SE 7 Features and Enhancements:
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/jdk7-relnotes-418459.html

A Look at Java 7's New Features:
http://radar.oreilly.com/2011/09/java7-features.html

Contribute to JDK 8:
http://openjdk.java.net/projects/jdk8/
http://jdk8.java.net/

JavaFX:
http://javafx.com/
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javafx/overview/index.html

Java EE at a Glance:
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javaee/overview/index.html

Java for Mobile Devices:
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javame/javamobile/overview/getstarted/index.html

Oracle NoSQL Database:
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/database/nosqldb/overview/index.html

Wednesday Sep 14, 2011

Working with Java SE 7 Exception Changes

A new article by systems architect Manfred Riem, now up on otn/java, titled “Working with Java SE 7 Exception Changes,” covers important developments in Java 7’s Project Coin, focusing on exception handling -- specifically multi-catch, rethrow, and try-with-resources. Project Coin consists of the following small language changes, which are intended to simplify common programming tasks: strings in switch statements; better integral literals; multi-catch exceptions; improved type inference for generic instance creation; try-with-resources; and simplified varargs method invocation.

From the article itself:

“The exception handling changes in Java SE 7 allow you not only to program more concisely, as demonstrated in the multi-catch examples, but they also allow you to partially handle an exception and then let it bubble up, as covered in the re-throw examples. Java SE 7 also facilitates less error-prone exception cleanup…”

Read the complete article here.

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